Admission Requirements

The University of Arizona welcomes applications for admission from all individuals who qualify. Students with a record of success or high motivation to succeed will find the rich blend of academic and social opportunities for learning particularly well suited to their needs.

The University strives to create a campus environment which understands, fosters, and embraces the value of diversity among students, faculty and staff. Diversity encompasses differences in age, color, ethnicity, gender, national origin, disability or handicap, race, religion, sexual orientation or Vietnam era veteran status. This institution is committed to the belief that all persons are valued for their individual characteristics, talents and contributions.

The Office of Admissions and New Student Enrollment offers numerous opportunities for visiting the University including campus tours, personal interviews, and meetings with faculty members. Prospective students should call the Office of Admissions and New Student Enrollment at (520) 621-3641 for information about campus visitation programs, to arrange for personal appointments and for student-conducted campus tours.

Inquiries regarding admission policies and procedures for undergraduate programs should be directed to the Office of Admissions and New Student Enrollment. Information about admission to the Graduate College, the College of Law, and the College of Medicine may be obtained from the admissions office of the respective college.

The University of Arizona reserves the right to alter its published policies and to adopt additional admission requirements or change present ones, subject to the approval of the Board of Regents.

Further, the University reserves the right to cancel the admission of any individual whose attendance, in the opinion of the appropriate administrative officer and the President, would not be mutually beneficial to both the student and the institution.

APPLICATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION

Applications for undergraduate admission may be obtained by writing or calling:

Office of Admissions and New Student Enrollment
The University of Arizona
Robert L. Nugent Building
Tucson, AZ 85721
(520) 621-7783

Admission Application Fee

Arizona residents do not pay an application fee. Nonresidents of Arizona and students from foreign countries are charged a $35.00 application fee. This payment must be in the form of a check or money order made payable to The University of Arizona and must be submitted with the application for admission. Applications are not reviewed unless accompanied by this nonrefundable fee. This fee is subject to change; consult your application for the correct amount.

Deadlines for Application

As deadlines may change for applications for admission, prospective students should contact the Office of Admissions and New Student Enrollment for updated information. The current deadlines for application are:

Freshman Application/Notification Time Lines

Fall-Students interested in attending The University of Arizona should apply for admission and services for new students (financial aid, scholarships, residence hall space, orientation/registration and summer programs) based upon the time lines and in advance of all deadlines. Financial aid and scholarship deadlines are March 1. Residence hall and orientation/registration forms accompany the certificate of admission, and reservations for these services should be made shortly after the certificate of admission is received.

Early Action Deadline:

Complete application received by November 1 will have a decision by December 1;
Complete application received by December 1 will have a decision by January 15.

Complete application received between December 2 and April 1 will have a decision approximately six weeks after the completed application is received.

The application deadline for freshman applicants for the fall semester is April 1.

SPRING AND SUMMER-Applications and supporting transcripts must be received by the deadlines below:

Spring Semester: December 1

Summer Session: April 1

Transfer Application Time Lines

FALL-The deadline for transfer applicants is June 1. However, applicants are encouraged to apply no later than March 1. Applications are reviewed on a continuing basis after all appropriate credentials are received.

SPRING AND SUMMER-Applications and supporting transcripts must be received by the deadlines below:

Spring Semester: December 1

Summer Session: May 1

SAT or ACT Requirements

All freshman students are required to take the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the American College Test (ACT)
and have official scores sent to The University of Arizona. To submit SAT scores, indicate code 4832 on the test reservation form or code 0096 on the ACT reservation form. Information regarding these tests may be obtained from high school counselors. Transfer applicants who have earned less than 36 transferable semester hours of credit may be required to submit official SAT or ACT results.

Residency Classification

In Arizona, as in all other states, instruction fees at publicly supported universities are lower for residents than for nonresidents. Through the payment of taxes, Arizona residents contribute to the general fund of the state from which the legislature appropriates funds comprising the major source of support for Arizona's universities.

A student enrolling at The University of Arizona for the first time, or a student returning after an absence of one or more semesters, must provide information which will allow classification as either a resident or nonresident of Arizona for tuition purposes. For new students, this information is requested on the application for admission; for returning students, a domicile affidavit is provided with the application for readmission. Because international students (non-immigrants) are classified nonresidents of Arizona while enrolled, a domicile affidavit is not required.

Health Verification Requirements

All students born after December 31, 1956, must submit proof of vaccination for measles and rubella since 1980 before they will be allowed to register for classes. Additionally, it is recommended that recent (within six months) results of a TB test be submitted. If the skin test is positive, a chest x-ray is recommended. Medical or nursing students should defer the chest x-ray until arrival at the University.

Health service requirements are subject to change. Affected students will be notified when appropriate.

ADMISSION AS A NON-DEGREE STUDENT

Policy revised 5/7/07: removal of 6-unit enrollment limit per semester.

A student may enroll in University courses through undergraduate non-degree status. A maximum of 15 credits completed as a non-degree seeking student may be used for fulfilling undergraduate degree requirements. Non-degree students, with the exception of students enrolled in the Arizona Universities Network (AZUN), are not eligible for federal financial aid. Non-degree students are not eligible for housing during Fall or Spring semesters, but may apply for Summer housing. A student disqualified from the University cannot attend as a non-degree student.

Deadlines for nondegree admission are August 1 for the fall semester,
December 1 for the spring semester,
May 1 for the first summer session, and June 1 for the second summer session.

Applications for nondegree admission may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and New Student Enrollment.

Four classifications for nondegree students are available. They are:

NONDEGREE REGULAR STUDENT-for community members, age 19 or older, who wish to upgrade skills or complete course work for personal enrichment.

NONDEGREE SUMMER SESSION ONLY-for those who plan to attend the summer session only. Completion of a high school or equivalent program is required.

NONDEGREE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT- for Arizona residents currently enrolled in high school who wish to attend a fall, spring, or summer term. In addition to the application, a letter from the high school principal approving concurrent enrollment and an official high school transcript are required. An alternative to this procedure is available through standardized testing. Please contact the Office of Admissions and New Student Enrollment for details.

NONDEGREE VISITING STUDENT-for students pursuing degree programs at other colleges or universities. Applicants must provide official transcripts or a letter from the home institution indicating good academic standing.

UNIVERSITY ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR ENTERING FRESHMEN

Applicants presenting academic achievement according to the criteria indicated below are excellent candidates for admission. High school achievement above minimum requirements and an early application increase a candidate's likelihood for an offer of admission. Because admission for nonresident students is competitive, applicants may meet minimum admission requirements as established by the Arizona Board of Regents yet not be accepted for admission.

General Aptitude

The University has two types of admission for freshman and transfer students: unconditional and conditional. Conditional admission requires a student to participate in some form of academic assistance program such as Fall Transition, special advising and freshman support groups, tutoring and study skills workshops, reduced course load, and new student orientation programs. A limited number of students may be referred to community college programs of study in anticipation of future enrollment.

A. Resident applicants; unconditional:

1. Rank in the upper 25 percent of the high school graduating class; or

2. Achieve a cumulative high school grade-point average of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale; or

3. Obtain a combined score of at least 930 on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), or a composite score of at least 22 on the American College Test (ACT); and

4. Complete all competency requirements listed in the Basic Competencies section below.

B. Resident applicants; conditional:

1. Rank between the upper 26 to 50 percent of the high school graduating class; or

2. Achieve a cumulative high school grade-point average between 2.50 and 2.99 on a 4.0 scale; and

3. Have no more than one deficiency in a maximum of two competency areas as listed in the Basic Competencies section below.

C. Nonresident applicants:

1. Rank in the upper 25 percent of the high school graduating class; or

2. Achieve a cumulative high school grade-point average of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale; or

3. Obtain a combined score of at least 1010 on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), or a composite score of at least 24 on the American College Test (ACT).

4. Complete all competency requirements listed in the Basic Competencies section below.

Basic Competencies

Applicants must demonstrate academic competency in each of the subjects listed below. Students must attain an overall grade-point average for courses in that subject of a least 2.0 (C average) on a 4.0 scale. A high school unit is defined as one year of study.

ENGLISH-4 units. High school English courses taken to satisfy this requirement must include literature and substantial emphasis on grammar and composition. Courses such as journalism, business communications, speech, and others that often include some emphasis on grammar or composition may not be substituted for a regular English course.

MATHEMATICS-3 units. Algebra I; plane geometry; Algebra II.

SOCIAL STUDIES-2 units. One unit in American history and an additional unit in another social science field such as world history, economics, sociology, geography, government, psychology, or anthropology.

LABORATORY SCIENCE-2 units. One unit from any two of the following: biology, chemistry, earth science or physics. A laboratory science course is defined as a course in which at least one class period each week is devoted to providing an opportunity for students to use equipment, materials, or specimens to develop skills in observation and analysis, and to discover, demonstrate, illustrate, or test scientific principles or concepts.

ADDITIONAL SUBJECT UNITS RECOM-MENDED-In addition to the above required course work, applicants are strongly advised to complete two years of a single foreign language; a fourth year of math; a third year of laboratory science and social studies; and other electives in music, art, drama, speech, or any other college preparatory subjects commonly offered for credit by secondary schools. A minimum of five units of additional course work is desirable.

ADMISSION WITH DEFICIENCIES

Applicants who meet the general aptitude requirements but who have not completed all of the competency requirements may be admitted with deficiencies. Applicants who lack no more than two units of the required course work may be admitted in this manner. There may be no more than one deficiency in any area, and deficiencies in both math and science are not allowed. A grade-point average lower than 2.00 (on a 4.0 scale) in any of the academic areas will be considered as one deficiency.

The deficiencies must be made up within one calendar year of the date of first enrollment, either by additional high school courses or by college courses. Students who fail to remove deficiencies within one calendar year of the date of their first enrollment will not be permitted to register for future terms. Academic competency requirements may also be met by obtaining a specified score on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), the ATP Achievement Tests, or the American College Test (ACT).

ADMISSION EXCEPTIONS

Applicants age 22 or older who demonstrate readiness for college-level study may be admitted under alternative requirements.

Applicants who do not meet the general aptitude and basic competency requirements may appeal in writing to be admitted on the basis of at least one of the criteria listed below. Decision will be made based upon the space available in the college selected and evidence of the student's potential for success.

A. Has a high school grade-point average of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale and either an upward grade trend during high school or an upward grade trend during the senior year in aca-demic courses such as mathematics, English, social studies, science, and foreign languages;

B. Has attained an average score on the General Education Development Test of at least 50;

C. Has positive written recommendations from professionals familiar with the applicant's academic potential as demonstrated by work experience, leadership ability, or extracurricular activities;

D. Does not meet the general aptitude requirement but has completed high school courses in English, mathematics, laboratory science, or social studies in excess of the minimum basic requirements and/or provides evidence of above average grades for courses taken in those subjects and has no deficiencies in the basic competencies.

ADMISSION TO PARTICULAR COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS

Agriculture

Applicants are expected to present credit in mathematics and laboratory science as follows: one unit of algebra I, one unit of algebra II, one unit of plane geometry, and one unit of physics, chemistry or biological science with a lab. Students are strongly advised to include among their electives additional courses in mathematics such as trigonometry, advanced algebra or solid geometry. Students are strongly encouraged to have their own microcomputer. To be compatible with College of Agriculture Computer laboratories, students should have a Windows-based, 486 or higher speed processor, with word processing, spreadsheet, and communications software.

Architecture

Applicants are expected to present credit in mathematics and laboratory science as follows: one unit of algebra I, one unit of algebra II, one unit of plane geometry and two units of laboratory science, one of which must be physics or chemistry. Three units of laboratory science, biology, chemistry, and physics are strongly recommended. Entering students are also strongly advised to include among their electives additional courses in mathematics such as trigonometry, advanced algebra and solid geometry; computer drafting and modeling; one or more studio art courses; and two or more years of foreign language. (Spanish is preferred, as the college offers an exchange program in Mexico.)

Arts and Sciences

Applicants are expected to complete patterns of study, with better than average grades, which offer a solid preparation for university academic areas. Each applicant is expected to demonstrate completion of the required college preparatory courses. Included are mathematical courses which include algebra, geometry, trigonometry, calculus, and mathematical analysis; study of second languages, natural and physical sciences; the humanities; and English courses. English courses in the 11th and 12th grades should include substantial writing, both expressive and analytical, demanding a high level of thinking skills and integrated with extensive reading of significant literature.

Business and Public Administration

Applicants should present credit in mathematics as follows: one unit of elementary algebra, 1/2 unit of intermediate algebra, and 1/2 unit of advanced algebra.

Upper-division courses in the college are open only to students who meet the requirements for advanced standing, as specified in the College of Business and Public Administration section of this
catalog.

Education

Formal admission to the College of Education is required of all undergraduate students who wish to pursue a major for a College of Education degree as well as for students who wish to enroll in restricted professional education courses for the purpose of earning a teaching certificate. Students must have completed 56 semester units of credit applicable to a baccalaureate degree with a cumulative grade-point average of 2.5 (on a 4.0 scale) or better to be considered eligible for consideration for admission to the College of Education. Those undergraduates wishing to enroll in professional education courses for the purpose of obtaining a teaching certificate must meet the College of Education entrance requirements. For further information regarding admission criteria and requirements, see the College of Education section of this catalog.

Engineering and Mines

Applicants are required to present 1/2 unit of trigonometry. It is strongly recommended that one unit of physics and one unit of chemistry be presented. Students transferring into the college must have a cumulative grade-point average of 2.50 in all previous university studies. Applicants must be ranked in the upper 25 percent of the high school graduating class; or have achieved a grade-point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale; or a composite score of 23 (24 for out-of-state applicants) on the ACT; or a minimum combined score of 1050 on the SAT.

Health-Related Professions

Admission to the school is solely through acceptance into a specific program. Applicants are required to have completed 56-63 semester hours of college credit and to have maintained a minimum 2.2500 grade-point average on all collegiate work attempted. Applicants must meet the school's general prerequisites as well as the prerequisites and grade-point average established for the program of study to which the student is applying.

Nursing

Admission to the College of Nursing requires the completion of three semesters of a specified prenursing curriculum and formal application to the college. See the College of Nursing section of this catalog for further information.

Pharmacy

Admission to the College of Pharmacy requires the completion of two years of a specified prepharmacy curriculum and formal application to the program. See the College of Pharmacy section of this catalog for further information.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAMS

Advanced Placement (AP)

Students who have completed college-level courses in secondary schools and have taken the advanced placement examinations given by the College Entrance Examination Board will be considered for advanced placement and for the granting of college credit toward degree requirements.

The Advanced Placement Program recognizes that many students can complete college-level courses while they are still in high school. The University of Arizona encourages and recognizes this achievement. The program provides course descriptions and professional consultants to help schools establish college-level courses for their stronger students. It sets, administers, and grades examinations in these courses. It sends the grades, together with supporting materials, to the students' colleges. For University of Arizona credit policies, please see the section on advanced placement under "Proficiency and Exemption Examinations, Credit by Examination" in the chapter entitled Academic Policies and Graduation Require-ments.

Students should contact the Office of Admissions and New Student Enrollment, consult their high school counselors, or write to the College Entrance Examination Board, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, for more details.

International Baccalaureate (IB) Higher Level Examinations

Students enrolled in U.S. and international high school programs are encouraged to prepare for IB Higher Level Examinations. The IB curriculum is designed to motivate the academically talented student toward maximum achievement. The University of Arizona welcomes IB applicants, recognizing them as competitive candidates for increasingly selective admission. We offer university credit in transfer for IB Higher Level subjects passed at a high enough grade level.

College-Level Examination Program (CLEP)

The University of Arizona grants credit for both the general examinations and the subject examinations of the College-Level Examination Program of the College Entrance Examination Board.

ADMISSION OF TRANSFER STUDENTS

Application for Admission

Applications for admission may be obtained by writing or calling:

Office of Admissions and New Student Enrollment
The University of Arizona
Robert L. Nugent Building
Tucson, AZ 85721
(520) 621-7783

Students transferring from other colleges and universities are required to file official transcripts from all previously attended schools with the Office of Admissions and New Student Enrollment. Students may not apply for admission solely on the basis of their high school records if they have attended college. Any student who does so is subject to suspension from the University and withholding of any degree received.

Admission Requirements for Transfer Students

A. Resident transfer applicants; unconditional:

1. A cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale in at least 12 transferable academic credits; and

2. Completion of all high school competency requirements as indicated in the table above (if less than 36 transferable credits have been earned).

B. Resident transfer applicants; conditional:

1. A cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale in at least 12 transferable academic credits; and

2. No more than one deficiency in a maximum of two competency areas (if less than 36 transferable credits have been earned).

C. Nonresident transfer applicants: Admission is competitive; a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.5 on a 4.0 scale is required to be considered for admission as a transfer student. However, actual admission will be based upon the overall qualifications of the nonresident applicant pool.

All students transferring with less than 36 transferable semester units will be subject to the same requirements as regular admittees from high schools and must show evidence of having fulfilled the required high school subject units. Such units must be completed in the same manner as designated for entering freshmen.

Note: The above statements do not necessarily apply to students seeking admission to divisions of the University which may have higher entrance requirements. See the sections stating requirements for admission to the colleges of architecture, business and public administration, education, engineering and mines, and pharmacy.

Transfer of Credits

The University of Arizona evaluates applicants from regionally accredited postsecondary institutions or postsecondary institutions which are candidates for accreditation based upon the individual merits of their academic achievements. Credit is not given for grades lower than a C. Grades from other institutions are not included in the calculation of The University of Arizona grade-point average. Remedial, vocational, technical, highly specialized and personal development courses are not accepted for credit. Applicability of transfer credit to a student's academic curriculum is determined by the academic advisor in the student's major department.

Inquiries concerning transfer credit from foreign institutions should be directed to the Office of Admissions and New Student Enrollment, Foreign Credentials.

Credits from Community Colleges

While there is no limit to the total number of units of course work acceptable for transfer credit that may be transferred from an accredited community college to The University of Arizona, no more than 72 of those units may be applied toward the requirements for a bachelor's degree. The choice of the 72 units is at the discretion of the student in consultation with an advisor. Transfer students are encouraged to complete freshman and sophomore level general education course work at their community colleges. Transferability of courses of independent study, internship, or practicum will be determined by the appropriate department or college at The University of Arizona and may be restricted both in number of units and in degree applicability. Students who have taken community college courses in these categories may petition for an exception.

While all courses offered for transfer will be accepted by the University according to these rules, the specific lower-division requirements of various curricula vary widely. In order to complete the baccalaureate program in the normal time span, the student should consult the appropriate Colleges section of this catalog and the head of the appropriate University department to determine requirements of a particular program.

Normally, a community college course whose content is offered at The University of Arizona in the upper division (carrying a course number of 300 or higher) will not be accepted as the equivalent of The University of Arizona upper-division course.

The Transfer General Education Core Curriculum (TGECC)

The Arizona public community colleges and The University of Arizona have agreed upon a common structure for a general education core curriculum. This common agreement is called the Transfer General Education Core Curriculum (TGECC). The TGECC is composed of a minimum of 41 semester units of lower-division general education course work in which a student may prepare for transfer. Students transferring from an Arizona community college to the University have the option of completing the lower-division general education requirements at the University or completing the TGECC. Completing the TGECC will fulfill lower-division general education requirements at the University. Students utilizing this option will still be required to fulfill lower-division program requirements and prerequisites within their college and major/minor area of study. In order to complete a degree program efficiently, students should select courses to meet the TGECC requirements that will also fulfill program requirements in the college and major they intend to pursue upon transfer. The requirements for the TGECC are available through the Arizona community college advising center.

The Community College Transfer Guide

The community college Transfer Guide presents the lower-division requirements of bachelor's degree programs at The University of Arizona in terms of the transferable courses available at Arizona community colleges, numbered in the community college notation. The Transfer Guide should be used in conjunction with The University of Arizona General Catalog and the Arizona Higher Education Course Equivalency Guide. Students should refer to the community college catalogs for descriptions of the courses listed in the Transfer Guides.

Transferability of community college courses not listed in the Transfer Guide or the Course Equivalency Guide must be approved by The University of Arizona academic unit which offers the degree being sought. Courses accepted for transfer in this way may be restricted both in number of units transferable and the manner in which they may be used to satisfy degree requirements.

While all courses offered for transfer will be accepted by the University subject to the above rules, the specific lower-
division requirements of various curricula vary widely. In order to complete the baccalaureate program in a timely manner, the student should consult the section of the Transfer Guide that is appropriate for the student's curriculum.

ADMISSION OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

Students with non-immigrant visas should request application materials for undergraduate admission from the Office of Admissions and New Student Enroll-ment, Foreign Credentials, Robert L. Nugent Building. A $35.00 application fee is required. This payment must be in the form of a check or money order drawn on a U.S. banking affiliate, and made pay-able in U.S. dollars to The University of Arizona. The University does not accept International Postal Money Orders. International students are expected to have above-average grades, proficiency in the English language, and adequate financial resources for each year of attendance. International students are not required to take the American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) unless they are graduating from a U.S. high school. The results of national exams must be submitted directly from the examining board.

All applicants whose native language is not English are required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), which is given at test centers worldwide under the direction of the Educational Testing Service. A minimum composite TOEFL score of 500 is required for full-time admission. For test information, write: TOEFL Publications, Box 6154, Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6154. Results of the TOEFL are valid for two years. Applicants should request that TOEFL (Box 6153, Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6153) send their scores to The University of Arizona (UA code number 4832). The scores must be received before the application for admission can be considered. Newly admitted international students may also be required to take a math and English placement test and further study in English if necessary. Transfer students from U.S. colleges or universities must check with their academic advisor and/or the University Composition Board to determine their upper-division writing proficiency requirements.

For those lacking college-level English proficiency, the University's Center for English as a Second Language (CESL) offers full-time English language training. The full semester sessions carry no college credit, but satisfactory completion of CESL study (which includes taking the TOEFL examination) will meet the English proficiency requirement for admission. Request further information by writing to CESL, Room 100, Building 24. For students seeking academic admission a statement of academic admissibility should be requested from the Office of Admissions and New Student Enrollment, Foreign Credentials, before applying to CESL. Admission to CESL does not guarantee admission to any full-time credit program at The University of Arizona.

Other non-immigrants may arrange to take the International TOEFL on The University of Arizona campus and should contact the Testing Office, located in Old Main, Room 223, for registration information.

Non-immigrants must submit proof of financial resources to support themselves while in residence at The University of Arizona. If sponsorship is through an organization or government agency, the Office of Admissions and New Student Enrollment, Foreign Credentials, should be notified directly by the sponsor of the terms of scholarship support. These must include instructions if The University of Arizona is to bill for tuition and fees. The address for billing must be through an embassy or other agent in the United States; otherwise, the students must pay their own fees at registration.

Having provided the first year's expenses and having earned superior grades during at least one year of study at the University, international students may be considered for one of the very few, highly competitive international student tuition waivers. The United States Immigration Department restricts employment for pay of anyone in this country on a student visa, and non-immigrants should not expect to supplement their income through employment.

There are three mandatory health requirements for all international students and scholars.

1) All international students are required by University regulations to have current health insurance. All non-sponsored students and scholars are required to purchase The University of Arizona's supplemental health insurance. Sponsor insurance must be approved by the Student Health Service. If the student is on a J-1 visa, all accompanying family members must also be enrolled in the University's supplemental health insurance plan. (Contact the Student Health Service Insurance Office for application forms.)

2) All international students must participate in a tuberculosis screening program. The tuberculosis screening test must be conducted by the University Student Health Service before class registration. Proof of screening by any other organization is not acceptable.

3) All students born after December 31, 1956, must provide documentation of adequate measles and rubella immunity before registering for classes at The University of Arizona. Documentation must show proof of vaccination for measles and rubella since 1980.

Information about insurance, TB screening and immunization requirements will be forwarded to all international students upon admission to the University.

Application Deadlines

April 1 is the deadline for summer and fall and September 15 is the deadline for spring. To meet the deadlines, the application and all other credentials and statements must be received in the Office of Admissions and New Student Enrollment, Foreign Credentials, by the above dates.

ADMISSION OF STUDENTS WHOSE NATIVE LANGUAGE IS NOT ENGLISH

Applicants whose native language is not English are required to take the
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), which is given at test centers worldwide under the direction of the Educational Testing Service. A minimum composite TOEFL score of 500 is required for admission to an academic program. For test registration information, write: Test of English as a Foreign Language, Box 6154, Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6154.

In Tucson, arrangements may be made to take the Institutional TOEFL at The University of Arizona by contacting the Center for English as a Second Language, Room 100, Building 24. To take the International TOEFL, contact the Testing Office located in Old Main, Room 223.

ADMISSION OF DISABLED STUDENTS

The requirements for admission to The University of Arizona are the same for all students.

Prospective students who are disabled are encouraged to write or call the Center for Disability Related Resources, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, (520) 621-3268 (voice or TDD), in conjunction with the application process. A comprehensive program of academic support, rehabilitation, health and athletics/recreational services is available.

ADMISSION OF VETERANS AND CHILDREN OF DECEASED VETERANS

The University of Arizona is approved for the training of students under several government education programs for veterans and eligible dependents of deceased or disabled veterans. Eligible students, as well as those who wish to determine their eligibility, should apply at The University of Arizona, Center for Veterans and Off-Campus Students, Student Union, Room 353, Tucson, AZ 85721 or call (520) 621-6454.

Veterans who are making an initial application for their G.I. Bill benefits must provide the original or a certified copy of military record (DD-214). Eligible dependents who are making an initial application under Chapter 35 must provide a copy of their birth certificate and, if possible, the parent's V.A. claim number.

Students attending under the Veterans' Administration Vocational Rehabilitation Program must contact their vocational rehabilitation specialists prior to registration. This contact can be made through the center.

Additional services offered by the center include application for all V.A. educational benefits, academic counseling, and tutorial and referral assistance.

Exemption of Certain Veterans from Effects of Failing Grades

According to Arizona statute, failing grades in college courses received at Arizona post-secondary institutions prior to military service may not be used to deny admission to a U.S. veteran who has served for at least two years and was honorably discharged. This policy applies to the admission decision only. Failing grades awarded at The University of Arizona remain on the record. The student admitted or readmitted to the University under this statute is subject to all academic regulations and standards in this catalog.

Credit for U.S. Military Service

A Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services, published by the American Council on Education, has been adopted by The University of Arizona as a basis for evaluating armed forces training.

Credit for military service experiences may be acquired through standardized examinations (see credit by examination policy). Cases which fall outside of the regular policies of the University will be reviewed by the registrar. Military credit evaluation is completed only after a student has been admitted to the University and all required documentation has been submitted (normally, the form DD-214).

For active service terminated under honorable conditions in the armed forces, credit is given as follows: for a period of at least six months and less than a year, the University allows 4 units of military science; for one year or more of active service, 8 units of military science; for the rank of warrant officer, 6 upper-division units of military science, naval science, or aerospace studies; and for a commission at the rank of second lieutenant or higher (in the Army, Air Force, or Marine Corps), or the rank of ensign in the Navy, 12 upper-division units in military science, naval science, or aerospace studies. For more information, contact the Office of Admis-sions and New Student Enrollment.

Programs of Study

All veterans receiving benefits must choose a program of study and may take only courses that fulfill degree requirements. Veterans and their dependents are not allowed to enroll in course repeats, course audits, or independent study courses without the approval of the Center for Veterans and Off-Campus Students.

Attendance

Veterans and their dependents are compensated for attending classes and completing course work. Benefits will be reduced if the Center for Veterans and Off-Campus Students finds that either is not occurring.

Change in Status

Any time academic progress or other status of a veteran is changed, a notice will be sent to the Veterans' Administration Regional Office, within 30 days following the occurrence, or last day of class attendance. It is the veteran's responsibility to notify the Center for Veterans and Off-Campus Students of any status changes.

Veterans' Deferment of Tuition Payments

Veterans' tuition deferments are available to many veterans and eligible dependent students. All deferments must be approved by the veterans' coordinator.

READMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY

Applying for Readmission

1. Students absent from the University for a semester or longer must reapply.

2. Students who have attended other institutions and all international students (non-immigrants), should contact the Office of Admissions and New Student Enrollment to reapply.

3. Students who have attended other institutions since last attendance at the University must submit official transcripts of all courses completed prior to review of the readmission application. Transcripts should be sent to the Office of Admissions and New Student Enrollment.

4. Students planning to enroll in a new college must obtain written approval from the dean of that college prior to readmission.

5. Students who have previously attended the University in a nondegree status must apply for regular admission if intending to enter a degree program. Application should be made through the Office of Admissions and New Student Enrollment.

Note: Students who withdraw from the University for more than two consecutive semesters must meet degree requirements as outlined in the catalog in effect at their re-enrollment or during their registration.

Readmission Requirements

1. Students seeking readmission who were not on academic probation or under disqualification upon departure from the University are eligible to return upon application for readmission, if less than 12 college-level units have been attempted at other postsecondary institutions.

2. Students who have attempted 12 or more college-level units at other postsecondary institutions must submit an official transcript of all course work. A minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale is required for course work completed at other institutions. Otherwise, students must obtain written permission to re-enroll from the dean of the college in which they plan to enroll. The Office of Admissions and New Student Enrollment will process the application for readmission according to the written recommendation of the dean.

3. Students seeking readmission who left the University on academic probation or under disqualification must receive approval from the dean of the college they wish to enter prior to readmission.

RESIDENCY (DOMICILE) CLASSIFICATION FOR TUITION PURPOSES

In Arizona, as in all other states, instruction fees at publicly supported universities are lower for resident students than for nonresident students. Through the payment of taxes, Arizona residents contribute to the general fund of the state from which the legislature appropriates funds comprising the major source of support for Arizona's universities.

The rules used in classifying resident status assure that only bona fide residents are assessed the resident fee. The rules allow only domiciled persons to be classified as residents for tuition fee purposes.

In determining a student's residency, The University of Arizona follows the laws of the State of Arizona and the policies of the Arizona Board of Regents. The Board of Regents is required by law to establish for the universities under its jurisdiction and control uniform guidelines and criteria for the classification of students for payment of tuition. Attention is invited to relevant provisions of the constitution, statutes, and laws of Arizona, including Sections 3 and 6, Article 7 of the Constitution (which provisions have been held by the Supreme Court of Arizona to govern domicile for all purposes), Sections 15-1625, 15-1626, and 15-1801 through 15-1807 of the Arizona Revised Statutes, as amended.

A. A person who does not qualify to enroll as an in-state student must pay a nonresident tuition, in addition to other established fees and charges that are required for all students. An out-of-state student must pay an out-of-state tuition fee each semester in addition to a registration fee.

B. The general rule is that in order to obtain in-state status for tuition purposes, a student must establish his/her domicile in Arizona at least one year immediately prior to the last day of registration for the semester in which the student proposes to attend the University. Arizona domicile occurs when a person is physically present in Arizona with the intention of making Arizona his or her permanent home provided that the student can prove financial independence for the last two years.

There are certain exceptions to the general rule. A student may also be eligible for in-state status if he or she can establish that, on or before the last day of registration, he or she meets one of the following criteria:

1. Dependent. The student and his or her parent are domiciled in Arizona but have not met the one year durational requirement, and the parent is entitled to claim the student as a dependent for federal and state tax purposes.

2. Transferred Employee. The student is domiciled in Arizona, but has not met the one year durational requirement, and is an employee or spouse of an employee transferred to Arizona by his or her employer for employment purposes.

3. Military. The student is not domiciled in Arizona, but is a member of the U.S. Armed Forces stationed in Arizona pursuant to military orders or is a member's spouse or dependent child as defined in A.R.S. section 43-1001.

4. Native American. The student is not domiciled in Arizona, but is a member of a Native American tribe whose reservation land lies partially in Arizona and another state and is a resident of such reservation.

C. Mere presence of a person in the State of Arizona for one year does not necessarily establish a domicile for classifying that person as an in-state resident. All evidence is weighed under the presumption that a non-resident student's presence in Arizona is primarily for educational purposes and that decisions of an individual to establish domicile are generally made after completion of an education and not before. No person shall be deemed to have gained or lost a domicile by reason of his or her presence or absence while a student at any institution of learning.

D. The person must have his or her domicile determined prior to registration and payment of fees. The responsibility of registration under proper status is placed upon the individual. Prompt filing of the required domiciliary information will enable the University to determine classification prior to registration. The Board of Regents has promulgated a publication entitled: Summary of Tuition Classification Policies, which is incorporated by reference in this catalog, and the attention of all persons concerned with classification for tuition purposes is directed to this publication available in the office of the residency classification officer in Room 210, Administration Building. (These materials include: (a) definitions related to domicile; (b) guidelines, rules, and regulations applied to determine domicile; and (c) information on procedures for appeal.)

An affidavit or petition must be completed and filed prior to any decision concerning domicile. The affidavit is required upon original registration or after an absence of one or more semesters. A student desiring a change in classification must complete and file an Application to Change Domicile Classi-fication with all supporting documentation necessary to provide a basis for in-state classification.

In all cases where the records indicate that the student's domicile is not in Arizona, out-of-state tuition will be assessed. Any student found to have made a false or misleading statement concerning his or her domicile shall be subject to dismissal from the University.

E. Classification officers of the University shall be designated to determine domicile. If there is any question as to domicile, the matter should be brought to the attention of the classification officers and passed upon prior to registration and payment of fees. The same classification officers can, during the registration period published by the University or at other times, pass upon the domicile of a person.

F. The President of the University shall appoint one or more appeals committees to hear the cases of individuals who believe that the decision regarding their domicile is not consistent with the laws of the State of Arizona or the summary promulgated by the Arizona Board of Regents. An appeal shall be filed in the office of the residency classification officer. It shall be written, signed by the student, and accompanied by a sworn written statement of all facts relative to the matter. Notice of appeal shall be filed at any time within 35 days from the last day of registration published by the University. The person appealing shall have the right to appear and testify before the committee and to be represented by an advisor.