COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINES

Introduction

Engineering education is preparation for a professional career. While most graduates embark on careers in engineering practice, men and women with engineering majors find the baccalaureate program excellent preparation for other fields as diverse as law, medicine, business and government. An engineering education develops analytical and quantitative thinking, a critical but optimistic approach to problem solving, and the habit of self-directed future learning. Graduates make successful transitions to a wide variety of different careers. The graduate has a thorough understanding of how materials, energy, and information can be adapted to humanity's needs and desires. This is developed through the study of physical science, mathematics, engineering science, engineering design, humanities, social science and practice.

COLLEGE ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS

Entering freshmen will meet those requirements outlined in the Admission to the University section of this catalog. Notice that in the section titled "Admission to Particular Colleges, Schools and Programs, " College of Engineering and Mines entrance requirements differ from the general University requirements. Also, students transferring from other colleges or universities are required to present a cumulative grade-point average of 2.500 or better for all previous college work.

PROFESSIONAL FIELDS OF STUDY

The college offers four-year curricula leading to Bachelor of Science degrees in engineering and in areas of engineering science:

Engineering

Aerospace Engineering

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

Chemical Engineering

Civil Engineering

Computer Engineering

Electrical Engineering

Geological Engineering

Industrial Engineering

Materials Science and Engineering

Mechanical Engineering

Mining Engineering

Nuclear Engineering

Optical Engineering

Systems Engineering

Engineering Sciences

Engineering Mathematics

Engineering Physics

Hydrology

FRESHMAN YEAR

Students should identify an intended major from the above lists when they are admitted into the college. This will assure personal access to an academic advisor and initiate career decision making. After completion of ENGR 102 they should re-evaluate their career choices. There will be no loss in credit if majors are changed at the end of the freshman year.

The common freshman curriculum for all degrees offered by the college is as follows:

 First Semester                           Second Semester 

     Course           Units                  Course              Units
     ENGR 102          3                     ENGR 170/HSS**        3
     MATH 124/125a*    5/3                   MATH 125b             3
     CHEM 103a         3                     MSE/CHEM**            4
     CHEM 104a         1                     ENGL 102              3
     ENGL 101          3                     PHYS 141              4
     Hum./Soc. Sci.
     Elective          3
     Total             18/16                 Total                 17

*College algebra and trigonometry should be reviewed before
taking the Math 
Readiness Test.

**See options below

OPTIONS AVAILABLE DURING THE FRESHMAN YEAR

ENGR 170/HSS - Students can choose either of two computer programming languages or a HSS elective at this time, but the following are recommended:

ENGR 170 (FORTRAN) Aerospace Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Engineering Physics

ENGR 170 (Pascal) Industrial Engineering, Systems Engineering

ENGR 170 (Either) Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, Engineering Mathematics, Geological Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, Mining Engineering

Hum/Soc Sci Elect Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Hydrology, Mechanical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering, Optical Engineering

MSE/CHEM-Students can choose either chemistry option, but the following are recommended:

MSE 110 Aerospace Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Optical Engineering

CHEM 103b-104b Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Engineering Mathematics, Engineering Physics, Geological Engineering, Hydrology, Mining Engineering

Either Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Nuclear Engineering, Systems Engineering

Students who change majors at the end of the freshman year may need to learn the other computer language or take the other chemistry course. This will be determined by the department into which the student transfers, but additional credit thus earned will apply to the graduation requirements of the newly selected degree.

ACADEMIC ADVISING

Visit your advisor every semester. While this catalog is written to give students the maximum information about curricular requirements, all students should visit with their departmental academic advisor at least once each semester. Academic advisors are assigned by contacting the departmental offices.

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINES FRESHMAN HONORS PROGRAM

This program recognizes the abilities and achievements of high school graduates and offers a variety of special challenges and resources to encourage the full development of academic and interpersonal skills. The program is open to freshmen who have applied for admission to the College of Engineering and Mines and who have been accepted by the University Honors Program.

1. A Flinn Scholar or National Merit Scholar.

2. Among the top 5% of his or her graduating class.

3. An ACT composite score of at least 30 (or SAT of 1300).

Inquiries should be directed to: Dr. Dunbar Birnie, College of Engineering and Mines, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721. Applications for the University Honors Program can be obtained from the Honors Program, Slonaker Building, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721. Freshman honors students are strongly encouraged to register for ENGR 196a and 196b.

ACCREDITATION AND THE CURRICULAR CONTENT REQUIRED FOR ENGINEERING DEGREES

The Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) is the official agency for accrediting undergraduate engineering degrees. As part of the required curricular content, every engineering student must complete a minimum of 16 units of engineering design, 32 units of engineering science, and 16 units of humanities and social sciences courses. These requirements are integrated into the curricula that are specified on the following pages for each engineering degree.

Engineering Design (ED)

Engineering design is the process of devising a system, component, or process to meet desired needs. It is a decision-
making process in which resources are converted optimally to meet stated objectives. ED courses include at least some of the following features: development of creativity, use of open-ended problems, development and use of design methodology, formulation of problem statements and specifications, consideration of alternative solutions, feasibility considerations, and detailed system descriptions. They may also include constraints such as economic factors, safety, reliability, aesthetics, ethics, and social impact.

Engineering Science (ES)

The engineering sciences have their roots in mathematics and basic sciences, but carry knowledge toward creative application. These studies provide a bridge between the sciences and engineering practice. At least one ES course must be taken outside of the department of the major.

Humanities and Social Science (HSS)

The humanities are the branches of knowledge concerned with the culture and values of the human race, and the social sciences are studies of individual relationships in and to society. HSS studies assist in meeting the objective of a broad education and in meeting the objectives of the engineering profession. In the interests of making engineers fully aware of their social responsibilities and better able to consider related factors in the decision-making processes, HSS course work is required as an integral part of the engineering program.The HSS requirements must also be met by students majoring in engineering mathematics, engineering physics, and hydrology.

The ED and ES units of each engineering course are designated in the course description presented in the catalog section titled Departments and Courses of Instruction. A list of approved HSS courses is available in the Harshbarger Building, Room 134.

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINES SCHOLARSHIPS

A limited number of scholarships are recommended each year by departments within the College of Engineering and Mines. Students interested in applying for these scholarships should contact their departmental offices for information. It is usually best to do this prior to March 1.

OPTIONS

Computer Software Engineering Option

This option deals with the analysis and design of systems in which computer programs play an important role. The computer software engineer performs the systems analysis which determines the computer programs to be developed, participates in the structured design of the programs, manages the programming effort and oversees the testing, debugging, installation and documentation of the programs. This option is available through the undergraduate degree program in systems engineering by structuring the choice of technical electives.

Energy Engineering Option

This option encourages interdisciplinary studies in the College of Engineering and Mines involving production, conversion, distribution, and utilization of energy from conventional and renewable sources. New perspectives on energy supply and demand are emphasized by an exposure to energy management principles, conversion technology and environmental issues. Courses include energy management and utilization, modern air conditioning systems, solar and wind energy, photovoltaics, electrical and thermal power systems, and environmental analysis.

Environmental Engineering

This option is available in the departments of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, Hydrology and Water Resources, Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering and Mining and Geological Engineering. This discipline applies fundamental engineering principles to the prevention and solution of problems affecting our environment. Course work concentration in this option covers important environmental topics such as air and water pollution, hazardous waste management, remediation and reclamation, site characterization and environmental regulations.

Manufacturing Systems Engineering Option

The modern manufacturing systems engineer designs, installs, implements, improves and manages computer integrated manufacturing systems. This option prepares students in the areas of organizing, scheduling, and managing the total manufacturing system from product design through fabrication, distribution and consumer services. This option is available through the undergraduate degree program in industrial engineering by structuring the choice of technical electives.

Medical and Biological Option

Medical and biological engineering is a multidiscipline in which physical scientists and engineers interact with life scientists and physicians to solve problems ranging from basic investigations to applications in clinics and the health care delivery system. The departments of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Nuclear and Energy Engineering, and Systems and Industrial Engineering have biomedical options available as undergraduate technical electives, graduate and minor programs and research. A university committee coordinates the option. See "Medical and Biological Engineering" under the Departments and Courses of Instruction section for further details.

Premedical Option

An engineering degree can provide a valuable background for physicians who will utilize the modern technological advances being implemented in the practice of medicine or who will participate in medical research. All departments in the college offer a premedical option. Electives which satisfy admission requirements for medical school are selected by the student and departmental advisor.

ADVANCED STANDING

Students must have been granted advanced standing to enroll in 300- or 400-level courses in the College of Engineering and Mines. To qualify for permanent advanced standing, students must meet the following criteria:

1. Successful completion of all required courses listed in the freshman and sophomore years of the appropriate curriculum of the student's major department. At least 12 units of required courses must have been completed at The University of Arizona. In addition, all admission deficiencies must have been removed.

2. A University of Arizona cumulative grade-point average in the above courses (excluding unspecified Humanities & Social Science Courses) of not less than the minimum set by the major department, but in no case below 2.000.

3. Completion of the Upper-Division Writing-Proficiency Examination.

Students otherwise qualified and lacking no more than three required lower-division courses, and/or the Writing-Proficiency Examination, may be granted temporary advanced standing. If these requirements are not completed during the next semester they are offered, the temporary advanced standing may be revoked until they are completed.

Transfer students who do not meet the 12-unit requirement set forth above, but who meet all other requirements, will be granted temporary advanced standing until they have completed a minimum of 12 units of required courses at The University of Arizona. At that time advanced standing will become permanent if the departmentally specified grade-point average requirement is met. If not, the temporary advanced standing will be revoked. Application forms are available at the Office of the Dean of the College of Engineering and Mines (Room 134, Harshbarger Building) and at all departmental offices in the college.

Students wishing to enroll in 300- or 400-level engineering courses, who are registered in colleges other than the College of Engineering and Mines, will normally be expected to have fulfilled the above criteria relative to their own majors. Such students should apply for permission at the office of the department offering the courses.

STUDENT PROFESSIONAL AND HONORARY SOCIETIES

The following professional organizations have active student chapters sponsored by the college and coordinated by the Engineering Student Council. Students are encouraged to participate in these organizations during all four years of enrollment. Contact departmental or college offices for information.

Scholastic Honorary Societies

Alpha Epsilon (agricultural & biosystems engineering)

Alpha Nu Sigma (nuclear engineering)

Eta Kappa Nu (electrical engineering)

Tau Beta Pi (all engineering)

Professional Organizations

American Ceramic Society

American Nuclear Society

American Society of Agricultural Engineers

American Society of Civil Engineers

American Society of Mechanical Engineers

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics

American Institute of Chemical Engineers

American Water Resources Association

Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers

Institute of Industrial Engineers

Society of Automotive Engineers

Society of Mining Engineers (AIME)

Society of Reliability Engineers

Student Energy Society

The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society

Other Engineering Student Organizations

American Indian Science and Engineering Society

Engineering Student Council

National Society for Black Engineers

Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers

Society of Women Engineers

Theta Tau

Minority Engineering Program

The Minority Engineering Program (MEP) is an academically-based student support program for ethnic minorities and women. For additional information, please contact Edmund Tellez, MEP Director, (520) 621-8103 or visit the MEP office in the Engineering Building, Room 212.

GRADUATE STUDY

The Master of Science (M.S.) degree is offered with majors in aerospace engineering, agricultural and biosystems engineering, chemical engineering, civil engineering, electrical and computer engineering, engineering mechanics, environmental engineering, geological engineering, hydrology, industrial engineering, materials science and engineering, mechanical engineering, mining engineering, nuclear engineering, reliability and quality engineering, systems engineering and water resources administration. The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree is offered with majors in aerospace engineering, agricultural and biosystems engineering, chemical engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, engineering mechanics, environmental engineering, geological engineering, hydrology, materials science and engineering, mechanical engineering, mining engineering, nuclear engineering, systems and industrial engineering and water resources administration. Complete details of both graduate programs are set forth in the Graduate Catalog.

PLACEMENT SERVICES

The following programs are available and recommended to all students in the College of Engineering and Mines. Information is available through the Career Services Office.

Cooperative Education Program

The Cooperative Education Program provides students with an opportunity to supplement their academic studies with periods of career-related work experience prior to graduation. Co-op is a full-time, paid work experience away from formal studies. Co-op students who carefully plan their academic schedules will be able to participate and still graduate in 41/2 to 5 years. A Summer Cooperative Education Program is also available.

Internship Program

Students who want to work part-time in a career position while attending the University should explore local opportunities available through the Internship Program.

Placement Program

Students who have qualified for advanced standing in the college have reached such a level of career progression that they should visit the Career Services Office and initiate preparation for placement interviews during the senior year. Training in resume writing, interviewing, and other placement skills are available.

DEGREES

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AEROSPACE ENGINEERING
(ABET Accredited)

Aerospace engineering is concerned primarily with solving the problems of flight, and places special emphasis on the design and operation of all types of aircraft, rockets, satellites, and spacecraft. In recent years, aerospace engineers have also become involved in the design of deep-submergence vehicles, modern surface ships, air cushion vehicles, and ground transportation systems.

Equipment supporting aerospace engineering studies includes digital computers with interactive graphics; internal combustion engines; microcomputers and microprocessors; nonlinear control systems; production and tooling shop; low and high-speed wind tunnels; refrigeration and heat transfer loops; and instrumentation of a wide variety.

Required Curriculum:

                         Sophomore Year 

First Semester Second Semester Course Units Course Units MATH 223 4 MATH 254 3 PHYS 241 4 A ME 230 3 C E 214 3 A ME 250 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective 7 C E 217 3 ECE 207 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective 3 Total 18 Total 18

Junior Year A ME 301 3 A ME 300 3 A ME 331a 3 A ME 302 3 ECE 208 3 A ME 320 3 MSE 331R 3 A ME 321 3 MSE 331L 1 A ME 323 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective 3 A ME 324 3 Total 16 Total 18

Senior Year

A ME 420 3 A ME 401 2 A ME 424 3 A ME 422 or A ME 428 3 A ME 425 3 A ME 455 3 Tech. Electives* 6 A ME 461 3 A ME 495s 1 Tech. Electives* 3 Total 15 Total 15

Please consult departmental literature for further guidance.

*The 9 units of technical electives are selected, in consultation with an advisor, from upper-division offerings in engineering or other scientific technical fields. Each student is required to complete 16 units of engineering design.

The courses above account for 14.5 design units, so a minimum of 1.5 technical electives must be selected from design courses.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING
(ABET Accredited)

Agricultural and biosystems engineers integrate mathematics and the biological, physical and engineering sciences with engineering design principles. These principles are applied to the design, analysis, construction, and management of equipment, systems, and facilities for the efficient production, processing, and utilization of food, fiber, and biological/biochemical products. The curriculum is based on a core of courses required of all students with electives to place emphasis in areas such as agricultural engineering, biological engineering, bioenvironmental engineering, irrigation engineering and water resources management, and agri-biosystems power. Modern developments in control systems, expert systems, robotics, sensors, microprocessors, materials science, and computer-based analyses are emphasized throughout the program as appropriate. The major in agricultural and biosystems engineering assumes substantial knowledge of mathematics. Students must complete MATH 124 or 125a, MATH 223 and 254 and STAT 361.

Required Curriculum:

Sophomore Year

First Semester Second Semester

Course Units Course Units MATH 223 4 MATH 254 3 PHYS 241 4 Science Elective* 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective** 3 A ME 250 3 Electives** 3 C E 217 3 C E 214 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective** 3 Electives** 3 Total 17 Total 18

Junior Year ABE 320 3 ABE 415 3 ABE 412 3 ENGL 308 3 A ME 230 3 STAT 361 3 A ME 331a or C E 321 3 ABE 455 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective** 3 ABE 457 1 Elective** 3 Elective** 3 Total 18 Total 16

Senior Year ABE 494a 3 ABE 423 3 ABE 447 3 ABE 494b 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective** 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective** 3 Electives** 8 Electives** 6 Total 17 Total 15

*Physics, chemistry, biology or related agriculture science.

**Total electives include eight units minimum of approved agricultural/biological sciences and the remaining technical electives dependent upon area of emphasis and advisor's approval. The technical electives should include a minimum of 5.5 units of design. Eighteen units of humanities and social sciences (HUM/SOC SCI), selected in accordance with COEM guidelines, are also required. Courses in each area must be selected in consultation with the student's advisor. For those concentrating in biological engineering CHE 201 and 316 may be substituted for the AME 230 and three units of electives.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
(ABET Accredited)

Chemical engineering is a profession which provides society with materials and energy in a safe and environmentally sound way. It deals with how chemicals are brought together to react, to be separated and purified, mixed, heated, contained and transported. Computers are used as an integral part of making the processes viable and economical.

Required Curriculum:

                           Sophomore Year 

First Semester Second Semester

Course Units Course Units

MATH 223 4 MATH 254 3 PHYS 241 4 PHYS 142 2 CHEM 241a 3 CHEM 323 1 CHEM 243a 1 CHEM 241b 3 CHEM 325 2 CHEM 243b 1 CH E 201 4 CH E 202 3 CH E 203 3 Total 18 Total 16

Junior Year

CH E 303 3 CH E 304 3 CH E 316 2 CH E 305 3 CH E 402 3 CH E 326 3 CHEM 480a 3 CHEM 480b or Adv. Sci. 3 H.S.S./T.E./T.R.** 6 H.S.S./T.E./T.R.** 6 Total 17 Total 18

Senior Year

CH E 307 3 CH E 443 3 CH E 413 3 H.S.S./T.E./T.R.** 14 CH E 420 3 CH E 442 3 H.S.S./T.E./T.R.** 6 Total 18 Total 17

**16 units of humanities and social science electives; 10 units of technical electives from appropriate fields of engineering, science or business; three units of C E; 3 of MSE; and 3 of E.C.E, selected from C E 214, ECE 207 and MSE 331R, or other courses as approved by a departmental advisor.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING
(ABET Accredited)

Civil engineering is concerned with a wide variety of elements of natural and man-made environments. The civil engineer conceives, designs, constructs, manages and maintains physical facilities and infrastructure such as residential and industrial buildings, bridges, transportation systems, tunnels, dams, power plants, space structures, water resources, water treatment systems, municipal and industrial waste disposal including hazardous waste treatment systems, and air and water pollution control systems. Students may elect to take a series of courses concentrated in structural engineering, geotechnical engineering, transportation engineering, hydraulic engineering, environmental engineering, or general civil engineering. Well-equipped physical and computer laboratories are available for instruction and research.

Required Curriculum:

                           Sophomore Year 

First Semester Second Semester

Course Units Course Units

MATH 223 4 MATH 254 3 PHYS 241 4 A ME 250 3 C E 210 3 C E 217 3 C E 214 3 C E 251 3 GEOS 101 3 SIE 265 3 GEOS 103 1 PHYS 142 2 Total 18 Total 17

Junior Year

C E 302 3 C E 322 3 C E 320 1 C E 331 3 C E 321 3 C E 340 4 C E 330 3 C E 370 3 C E 360 3 C E 394a 1 < C E 380 2 Tech. Elective* 3 ECE 207 3 Total 18 Total 17

Senior Year

C E 307 3 C E 400 3 C E 337 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective 6 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective 3 Tech. Elective* 6 Econ. Elective 3 Tech. Elective* 6 Total 18 Total 15

*To meet the technical elective requirement, students must fulfill one of the following option sequences: Environmental engineering: C E 371, 423, 478, HWR 450; geotechnical engineering: C E 423, 440, 441, (C E 402 or G EN 427); hydraulics/water resources:
C E 371, 423, 424, 427; structural engineering; C E 336, 432, (434 or 437), (402 or 440); transportation and highway engineering: C E 361, 462, 463, (452 or 468); general civil engineering: C E 336, 361, 371, 423, (440 or 441). Listings of other acceptable technical electives are available from advisors.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER ENGINEERING
(ABET Accredited)

The computer engineering program prepares students to work in the dynamic and rapidly expanding field of digital technology. Computer engineers design computers and computer systems, apply computers as components of larger systems, and apply digital techniques to solving a broad range of engineering problems. The curriculum includes a strong electrical engineering component, consisting of most of the required courses in the electrical engineering curriculum. To this base it adds extensive course work in both the hardware and software aspects of computers and digital systems. The program is strengthened by the availability of extensive laboratory and computing facilities.

The presence in the department of the Computer Engineering Research Laboratory, the Computer-Aided Design Laboratory, the Digital Image Analysis Laboratory, and the Computer-Aided Engineering Center, as well as research in artificial intelligence and expert systems, computer communications, computer networking, simulation, and other specialties, maintains a modern viewpoint in the undergraduate curriculum.

Required Curriculum:

Sophomore Year 

First Semester Second Semester

Course Units Course Units

MATH 223 4 MATH 243 3 PHYS 241 4 MATH 254 3 ECE 275 3 PHYS 142 2 ECE 274 3 ECE 220a 4 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective 3 C SC227 4 SIE 270 3 Total 17 Total 19

Junior Year

ECE 220b 4 ECE 320 3 ECE 372 3 ECE 351a 3 MATH 322 3 ECE 369 3 SIE 305 3 C SC 344 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective 3 C SC 342 3 Total 16 Total 15 Senior Year

ECE 340 3 ECE 495a* 1 ECE 494a* 3 Tech. Electives*** 9 Elec. Eng. Elective** 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective 3 Tech. Elective*** 6 C SC 430 or ECE 473 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective 3 Total 18 Total 16

*ECE 495c (limited enrollment) may be substituted for 494a and 495a.

**ECE 301 or ECE 381.

***Technical electives will be selected from 400-level courses in ECE or C SC, or ECE 351b in a program developed in consultation with a faculty advisor. These must include 4 units of engineering design.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
(ABET Accredited)

The goal of the electrical engineering undergraduate curriculum is to educate immediately productive electrical engineers who are also qualified to pursue further educational activities. The program emphasizes basic scientific knowledge, modern design techniques, and laboratory techniques needed for design verification.

The presence in the department of the Computer Engineering Research Laboratory, the Computer-Aided Design Laboratory, the Electromagnetics Laboratory, the Microelectronics Laboratory, the Center for Microcontamination Control, and the SEMATECH Center of Excellence, as well as research in lasers, micro electronics, pattern recognition and image processing, simulation, artificial intelligence, optical communications, robotics, and other specialties, maintains a modern viewpoint in the undergraduate program.

Required Curriculum:

                          Sophomore Year 

First Semester Second Semester

Course Units Course Units

MATH 223 4 MATH 254 3 PHYS 241 4 PHYS 142 2 ECE 220a 4 ECE 220b 4 ECE 274 3 ECE 275 3 Engr. Sci. Elective* 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective 3 Total 15 Total 18

Junior Year

ECE 301 3 ECE 302 3 ECE 320 3 ECE 340 3 ECE 351a 3 ECE 351b 3 MATH 322 3 ECE 352 3 SIE 305 3 ECE 381 3 Total 15 Total 15

Senior Year

ECE 494a** 3 ECE 495a** 1 Tech. Electives 12 Tech. Electives*** 9 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective 6 Total 18 Total 16

*Engin. Sci. Elective: To be chosen from the following: C E 214 (Statics); A ME 250 (Dynamics); MSE 331R (Matls for Engin.); SIE 265 (Engin. Econ); A ME 331a (Fluid Mech); A ME 230 (Thermo); SIE 270.

**ECE 494c (limited enrollment) may be substituted for 494a and 495a.

***Technical Electives: Upper-division courses in engineering, math, or science, chosen in consultation with a faculty advisor to conform to one of the approved department options. Not less than 15 credits must be in ECE and not less than 8 units must be in engineering design.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS

The engineering mathematics curriculum is designed to give the student a deep understanding of mathematics to complement specific interests in engineering. Graduates of this curriculum working in industry may use their proficiency in analysis, statistics, computer science or numerical analysis to develop techniques needed to obtain meaningful solutions to engineering problems for which there is no standard solution. The program can be tailored to give each individual the desired concentration in particular areas of mathematics and engineering, the goal being breadth with selective depth. The engineering mathematics curriculum gives an excellent background for graduate work in applied mathematics and computer science as well as various areas in engineering.

Required Curriculum:*

Sophomore Year 

First Semester Second Semester

Course Units Course Units MATH 223 4 MATH 215 3 PHYS 241 4 MATH 254 3 SIE 270 3 PHYS 142 3 C E 214 3 C E 217 3 Elective** 3 Elective** 3 Total 17 Total 15

Junior Year

MATH 424 3 MATH 421 3 A ME 230 3 A ME 331a 3 ECE 207 3 ECE 208 3 SIE 305 3 SIE 330R/330L 4 Elective** 6 SIE 370 4 Total 18 Total 17 Senior Year

MATH 475a 3 MATH 475b 3 MATH 484 3 MATH 485 3 Electives** 10 Electives** 9 Total 16 Total 15

*Those students interested in using technical electives to emphasize computer science should include C SC 227 and 237 their first three semesters.

**Humanities and social science electives: 17 units to be chosen from a list approved by the college. Technical electives: 17 units to be chosen in consultation with an advisor.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING PHYSICS

Modern engineering regularly begins at the edge of scientific knowledge. The engineering physics program is designed to provide the strong scientific base and the grounding in engineering perspective essential to use this knowledge. Graduates are prepared for employment in a variety of engineering fields. They are also prepared for graduate study in physics and in some areas of engineering. Which preparation predominates depends on choices of technical elective courses. These are normally upper-division units chosen in conference with an advisor, which constitute a coherent supplemental program.

Students committing to the program in the freshman year are advised to follow the curriculum shown below. The engineering college freshman curriculum is also acceptable; students choosing this option should plan to replace PHYS 111a-111b; 112a-112b with PHYS 110, 116, 121, and 330.

Required Curriculum:

                          Freshman Year 

First Semester Second Semester

Course Units Course Units

ENGR 102 3 ENGR 170 3 MATH 124/125a 5/3 MATH 125b 3 ENGL 101 3 ENGL 102 3 PHYS 151 4 CHEM 103a 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective 3 CHEM 104a 1 PHYS 152 4 Total 18/16 Total 17

Sophomore Year

MATH 223 4 MATH 254 3 PHYS 251 4 PHYS 252 4 CHEM 103b 3 ECE 207 3 CHEM 104b 1 C E 217 3 C E 214 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective 3 Total 18 Total 16 Junior Year

PHYS 320 3 PHYS 325 3 PHYS 321 3 PHYS 371 3 PHYS 381 1 PHYS 382 1 MATH 422a 3 MATH 422b 3 A ME 331a 3 Tech. Elective 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective 3 Total 16 Total 16

Senior Year

PHYS 331 3 PHYS 332 3 PHYS 472 3 PHYS 360 3 PHYS 481 1 PHYS 482 1 Tech. Electives 6 Tech. Electives 9 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective 3 Total 16 Total 16

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
(ABET Accredited)

Geological engineering involves the application of geological science to the design of engineering structures. The geological engineer is an environmentalist trained to recognize and understand the significance of geological conditions and their influence on engineering designs.Graduates spend much of their time on location throughout the world working on the earth's surface and underground. Projects requiring geological engineering expertise cover a broad spectrum, ranging from domestic toxic waste reclamation to foreign dam investigations to mineral resources exploration.

An environmental engineering option is available in the Department of Mining and Geological Engineering. This discipline applies fundamental engineering principles to the prevention and solution of problems effecting our environment. Course work concentration in this option covers important environmental topics such as air and water pollution, hazardous waste management, remediation and reclamation, site characterization, and environmental regulations.

Required Curriculum:

                          Sophomore Year 

First Semester Second Semester

Course Units Course Units

MATH 223 4 MATH 254 3 PHYS 241 4 PHYS 142 3 G EN 120 3 C E 214 3 GEOS 101, 103 4 G EN 219 3 GEOS 321 4 Total 15 Total 16

Junior Year

G EN 448 4 G EN 470 3 C E 217 3 C E 340 4 SIE 265 3 HWR 431 3 GEOS 302 4 Tech. Elective* 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective* 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective* 3 Total 17 Total 16

Summer Session

GEOS 412 3 G EN 416 3

Senior Year

G EN 402 4 G EN 424 3 G EN 407 3 G EN 425 3 G EN 427 4 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective* 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective* 4 Tech. Elective* 6 Total 15 Total 15

*The 25 units of electives are chosen by the student in consultation with a faculty advisor. 16 units are selected from humanities and social sciences and must satisfy the college requirements for these courses. The remaining 9 units of technical electives are selected from engineering and science courses, and must include 3 units of design.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HYDROLOGY

Hydrology, the science of water, deals with the origin, distribution, and the physical, chemical and biological properties of the waters of the Earth. It has application to flood, drought, and weather-related hazards, water supply, recreation, the design of bridges and dams, pollution control, and other water management concerns. The hydrology curriculum is designed to give the student a basic knowledge of hydrology and allied subjects, including hydrologic modeling with computer applications. Flexibility is offered through the selection of humanities/social sciences, technical, and general electives so that a program of study can be developed which best fits the student's needs. Specialization options: Technical electives can be used to obtain specialization in the areas of hydrometerology, hydrogeology, environmental chemistry, environmental hydrology, water resources engineering, water resources engineering-systems, and water resources engineering-policy. Students should consult with the department regarding development of these options.

Graduates with the degree of Bachelor of Science in Hydrology obtain professional positions in the fields of hydrology and water resources. Because hydrology is a natural science, instruction is augmented at all levels with field trips in Arizona, a state which contains a great diversity of topographic and geologic features and climatic zones, making it a superb outdoor laboratory. The field course and an internship/practicum sequence provide direct experience with hydrologic measurements, testing, and data gathering. Students apply these techniques at field sites and in research laboratories to solve water resource problems.

Required Curriculum:

                    
                        Sophomore Year 

First Semester Second Semester Course Units Course Units MATH 223 4 MATH 254 3 PHYS 241 4 HWR 250 3 GEOS 101 3 PHYS 142 2 GEOS 103 1 GEOS 321 4 ATMO 171 OR 421 3 ECON 201a OR 210 3 Humanities Elective 3 Humanities Elective 3 Total 18 Total 18

Junior Year

HWR 431R,431L 3,1 HWR 407 3 C E 321 3 HWR 440 4 ENGR 170 3 HWR 450a,451 3,1 Humanities Elective 3 STAT 361 OR SIE 230 3 GEOS 450 4 HWR 396a 1 Total 17 Total 15

Summer (Presession and Summer Sessions)

HWR 414a 1 HWR 493 Internship* 2 Total 1-3

*Initiate Internship/Practicum spring OR summer. Final report due subsequent fall semester (Practicum 494).

Senior Year

HWR 443 3 HWR 415 3 HWR 450B* 3 HWR 427 OR WSM 467* 3 HWR 482* 3 HWR 445 3 HWR 494 Practicum* 1 ECOL 182 4 ENGL 308 3 Tech./Gen. Electives** 3 Tech./General Elective** 3 Total 16 Total 16

*Choose 4 out of 5: (1) HWR 427 or WSM 467; (2) HWR 482; (3) HWR 450B; (4) HWR 493/494 Internship/Practicum; (5) A course listed in any of the specialization options mentioned below. The Internship/Practicum project must be approved by the Practicum Instructor or undergraduate advisor. Honors students should complete an approved Senior Honors Thesis in lieu of the Senior Internship/Practicum sequence.

**Technical General Electives: A more generalized option or a more technically specialized option may be chosen. Consultation advisable; chosen electives may not be prerequisite or equivalent to required courses. If a specialization option is selected, choose 6-9 units total from ONE of the following options: Hydrometeorology: ATMO 300a, 300b, 421 441a 441b 451b. Hydrogeology: HWR 408; GEOS 302, 417, 453; SW 431, 461; GEN 448; MNE 427; MATH 322, 375, 422a-422b. Environmental Engineering: CHEEM 370, 371, 478. Environmental Chemistry: HWR 457, 471; CE 478, CHEM 241a, 322, 480a, 480b. Environmental Hydrology: HWR 481, 483; WSM 462, 468; GEOS 415, 462, 478; ANTH 307; MIC 205, 317, 425; GEOG 330; SW 461; AREC 217. Water Resources Engineering: CE 322, 370, 455, 458; WSM 462. Water Resources Engineering-Systems: RNR 417; AREC 217, 375; SIE 250 340, 350, 422. Water Resources Engineering-Policy: HWR 461, 481; RNR 480; POL 406, 480; MAP 305, 320. Accelerated Graduate Study (with permission): HWR 503, 506, 516, 535, 570, 584.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
(ABET Accredited)

Industrial engineering focuses on the design and implementation of integrated systems of people, materials, machines, energy and information. After first specifying system objectives, industrial engineers combine technical knowledge and skill from the physical, engineering and social sciences to design, implement, and operate the system. The industrial engineer is charged with the responsibility of ensuring high quality while simultaneously meeting cost and output goals. This is accomplished through the optimal allocation of resources throughout the system.

Industrial engineers practice in both administrative and production segments of manufacturing and service organizations. Industrial engineers are commonly employed in heavy industry (such as steel), medium industry (such as plastics and computers), and light industry (such as electronics assembly), health-care delivery, telecommunications, transportation and government. In each of these environments, industrial engineers are involved with a variety of systems such as production planning, quality assurance, inventory control, management information, facility layout, job/workplace design, material flow, and distribution. The importance of manufacturing is reflected by the presence of a manufacturing system engineering option.

The modern manufacturing systems engineer designs, installs, implements, improves and manages information-driven integrated manufacturing systems. This option prepares students to organize, schedule, and manage the total manufacturing system, from product design through fabrication, distribution and consumer services.

Required Curriculum:

                        Sophomore Year 

First Semester Second Semester

Course Units Course Units

MATH 223 4 MATH 254 3 ECON 210 3 PHYS 142 2 SIE 260 3 PSYC 101 3 SIE 270 3 ECE 207 3 PHYS 241 4 SIE 265 3 Total 17 Total 14

Junior Year

Hum/Soc. Sci. Elective. 3 SIE 321 3 SIE 340 3 SIE 370 4 SIE 377 or C SC 227 3 SIE 383 3 SIE 305 3 ENGL 308 3 MSE 331R 3 SIE 330R/L 4 Total 15 Total 17

Senior Year

SIE 410 4 SIE 442 3 SIE 431 3 Tech. Elective** 6 SIE 462 3 Hum/Soc. Sci. Elective* 6 SIE 463 3 SIE 495s 1 Tech. Elective** 3 Total 17 Total 15

*Hum. and soc. sci. electives must be chosen from a list approved by the College of Engineering and Mines and satisfy sequence requirements. Consult your faculty advisor.

**Three units of technical electives must be upper division SIE courses with at least one hour of engineering design (ED) and 2 hours of engineering science (ES). Others may be selected from a list of 300/400 level courses available in the departmental office and approved by the student's faculty advisor. In the manufacturing systems option, the technical electives are chosen from manufacturing oriented courses such as SIE 485 and 486.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
(ABET Accredited)

Materials science and engineering is the study of the structure, processing and properties of materials. The field covers the behavior of metals, ceramics, glasses, polymers, semiconductors and composites. The curriculum in MSE includes an unusually large number of elective courses, which can be taken both inside and outside MSE. This is a reflection of the interdisciplinary nature of the field.

All students in MSE are required to take the ten core courses, which cover the fundamental principles of MSE. Based upon a student's interests, an appropriate sequence of elective courses is decided upon with a faculty advisor in the sophomore year. Involvement in active research programs is an important part of undergraduate education in MSE. While participation is not mandatory, it is highly encouraged, and students are urged to seek out faculty and arrange for projects as early in their undergraduate careers as possible.The MSE curriculum prepares students for employment in materials research, development, and production. Graduates are also prepared for graduate study in the many facets of materials science and engineering.

Required Curriculum:

                        Sophomore Year 

First Semester Second Semester

Course Units Course Units

MATH 223 4 MATH 254 3 PHYS 241 4 MSE 260 4 MSE 222 3 Tech. Elective** 3 MSE 240 4 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective* 7 Total 15 Total 17

Junior Year

MSE 360R 3 MSE 380 3 MSE 360L 1 MSE 480 3 MSE 409 3 MSE 412 or CHEM 480a 3 Math. Elective* 3 Tech. Elective** 6 Adv. Basic Sci. Elective* 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective* 3 Total 16 Total 15

Senior Year

MSE 442a 2 MSE 442b 2 MSE Tech. Elective** 3 MSE 444 3 ECE 207 3 MSE Tech. Elective** 6 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective* 3 Tech. Elective** 3 Tech. Elective** 6 Total 17 Total 14

Each Student's program must include 16 units of engineering design content. Nine of these units come from the core courses (ENGR 102, MSE 360R, 442a, 442b, 444) and the rest must be made up through proper choice of electives.

*Electives must be chosen in consultation with the student's advisor.

**Technical Electives

Students are required to take 9 units of MSE technical electives. Generally, any course at 200 or higher level may serve as a technical elective. The following are suggested lists of course sequences for specialization in specific areas of materials science and engineering. Students not seeking specialization may combine courses from any of the sequences.

Physical Metallurgy,
Materials Science: MSE 331R, 331L, 431, 435, 440, 455

Process Metallurgy,
Materials Processing: MSE 405, 411, 413, 423, 452

Ceramics: MSE 424, 434, 470, 471

Electronic Packaging,
Microelectronics: MSE 435, 457, 465

Polymers, Biomedical
Engineering: MSE 460, 461, 462, 470

Microstructural
Analysis: MSE 488, 489

Culture and Materials
Technology: MSE 251, 255, 256, 257, 258, 479, 486

A total of 18 units of technical electives is required for the B.S. in Materials Science and Engineering. A course in chemical safety and a course in technical writing are highly recommended. Even though all of the technical electives could come from the MSE program, students are encouraged to take courses from related disciplines. Some of these disciplines are chemistry, physics, mathematics, statistics, biological sciences, biochemistry, microbiology, geoscience and other engineering areas. Typically, 200 or higher level courses in these disciplines are acceptable. Students with particular career or academic goals may propose technical electives in other subject areas. However, it is important that the courses are chosen in consultation with the advisor to make sure that the engineering design and science component requirements are met.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
(ABET Accredited)

Mechanical engineering is a broad discipline which covers the fields of solid and fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, and engineering design. Basic studies are devoted to machine dynamics, fluid flow, energy and power systems, mechanical properties of materials, and instrumentation. Students can specialize in a wide variety of topics, which include power systems, thermal sciences, automatic controls, reliability and quality assurance, mechanical design and manufacturing.Equipment supporting mechanical engineering studies includes digital computers with interactive graphics; internal combustion engines; microcomputer and microprocessors; nonlinear control systems; production and tooling shop; low- and high-speed wind tunnels; a laser-doppler velocimeter; refrigeration and heat transfer loops; instrumentation of a wide variety, and a materials test apparatus.

Required Curriculum:

                        Sophomore Year 

First Semester Second Semester

Course Units Course Units

MATH 223 4 MATH 254 3 PHYS 241 4 PHYS 142 2 C E 210 3 C E 217 3 C E 214 3 ECE 207 3 Hum./Soc.Sci. Elective* 3 A ME 250 3 ENGR 170 (FORTRAN) 3 Total 17 Total 17

Junior Year

A ME 230 3 A ME 300 3 A ME 301 3 A ME 302 3 A ME 331a 3 A ME 331b 3 A ME 352 3 A ME 432 3 ECE 208 3 MSE 331R 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective* 3 MSE 331L 1 Total 18 Total 16

Senior Year

A ME 400 2 A ME 412b 4 A ME 410 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective* 4 A ME 412a 4 Tech. Electives* 9 A ME 455 3 A ME 495s 1 Tech. Elective* 3 Total 16 Total 17

*Elective courses are chosen by the student in consultation with a faculty advisor. The 28 units of electives must contain 18 in the humanities and social sciences. At least 9 units must be in AME (exclusive of independent study which can at most total 3 units). Moreover, 3 of these units must be taken from a selected list of courses having a design emphasis. The remaining 12 units are technical electives, which are to be selected from engineering and science courses. Students are encouraged to discuss their program with an advisor.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MINING ENGINEERING
(ABET Accredited)

Mining engineering is that branch of engineering responsible for planning, developing and operating mining and other underground facilities. Mining engineers acquire an intimate understanding of the unique environment presented underground; they learn how rock behaves when excavated, how to plan and supervise mines and how to excavate, transport and process minerals and coal.

Graduates with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mining Engineering find employment in the fields of design and operation of underground and surface mines, management of mines, heavy construction projects and tunneling and underground chamber projects, heavy equipment development and finance.

Required Curriculum:

                               Sophomore Year 

First Semester Second Semester

Course Units Course Units

MATH 223 4 MATH 254 3

PHYS 241 4 MN E 220 3 MN E 120 3 C E 217 3 C E 210 3 C E 251 3 C E 214 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective* 3 Total 17 Total 15 Junior Year

MN E 426 1 MN E 219 3 A ME 331a 3 MN E 406 3 SIE 305 3 MN E 410 1 ECE 207 3 GEOS 321 4 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective* 3 Tech. Elective* 3 GEOS 101, 103 4 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective* 3 Total 17 Total 17 Senior Year

MN E 401 3 MN E 411 3 MN E 427 4 MN E 415 3 MN E 430 3 MN E 435 3 MN E 440 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective* 4 Tech. Elective* 3 Tech. Elective* 3 Total 16 Total 16

*The 25 units of electives are chosen by the student in consultation with a faculty advisor. 16 units (to include ECON 210) are selected from humanities and social sciences and must satisfy the college requirements for these courses. The remaining 9 units of technical electives are selected from engineering and science courses. These must include 3 units of design.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NUCLEAR ENGINEERING
(ABET Accredited)

Nuclear engineering is directed to the study of the release, control and application of all forms of energy resulting from nuclear reactions and to the utilization of the unique properties of radioactive materials in research, medicine, and materials processing. This branch of engineering is rooted in the physical sciences and mathematics; its applications range from power generation to radioisotope uses in science, medicine, and industry.

The four-year curriculum begins with a group of science and mathematics studies designed to provide the basis for work in the engineering sciences. Writing and computer skills are also included in the basic curriculum. Subsequent courses provide the specific engineering science and engineering design instruction needed to prepare for work as a nuclear engineer. The further development of computer skills in problem formulation, system modeling, and numerical evaluation are an essential part of this program. Further studies in the humanities and social sciences are included in the latter years of the program. For some students, the opportunity to take for the first time or expand already existing skills in a foreign language is a welcomed option.

The objective is to develop the skills and insight to allow a positive and creative response to new opportunities that may arise from future technological initiatives. Of importance is the understanding that continued intellectual development is a basic ingredient for continued success in any engineering field, and especially in the changing nuclear engineering discipline.

Facilities available for laboratory instruction and research include: the TRIGA nuclear reactor, operating in either the steady or pulsed mode; the 1.25 Mev Radiation Dynamics Electron Accelerator, operating as a source of electrons or bremsstrahlung; a 300 curie Gamma Ray Irradiator for materials and biological specimen irradiation. A variety of laboratories for radioactive material counting, radiochemical processing, materials studies on the effects of radiation, and related studies are also available.

The major in Nuclear Engineering assumes substantial knowledge of mathematics. Students must complete MATH 124 or 125a, MATH 223 and MATH 254.

Required Curriculum:

                             Sophomore Year 

First Semester Second Semester

Course Units Course Units MATH 223 4 MATH 254 3 PHYS 241 4 PHYS 142 2 ENGR 170 3 ECON 210 3 NEE 201 2 A ME 230 3 NEE 280 3 NEE 200 3 SIE 270 3 Total 16 Total 17

Junior Year

NEE 380 4 NEE 381 3 PHYS 242 3 NEE 483.. 3 ECE 207 3 NEE 484 3 A ME 331a 3 A ME 432 3 MSE 331R 3 Elective (H and SS)* 3 MSE 331L 1 Total 17 Total 15

Senior Year

NEE 406 4 NEE 414b 3 NEE 414a 3 NEE 481 3 NEE 482 3 Elective (H and SS)* 3 Elective (H and SS)* 3 Tech Electives* 6 Tech Elective* 3 Total 16 Total 15

Energy Management Option: NEE 440 and one of the following: NEE 441, 442, 445, 446 or 447

Health Physics Option: NEE 485a and 485b

Nuclear Waste Management Option: NEE 487a and 487b

*Elective courses are chosen by the student in consultation with a faculty advisor.
H&SS = ECON 210 plus 13 elective units (grid above shows suggested times; H&SS may be taken at any time during the student's academic career); Technical Electives = 9 units.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN OPTICAL ENGINEERING

The undergraduate optical engineering program is designed to educate optical engineers who will be productive immediately upon graduation in areas involving optical design, optical fabrication and testing, lasers, optical detectors, optical instrumentation, optical fiber communications. This program, which is an interdisciplinary program offered by the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Optical Sciences Center, has a strong electrical engineering component. The curriculum includes many of the courses required for the B.S. degree in electrical engineering, and qualified graduates should have little difficulty pursuing further educational opportunities at the graduate level if desired.

Required Curriculum:

                          Sophomore Year 

   First Semester                           Second Semester

  Course                  Units          Course                  Units
  MATH 223                 4             MATH 254                 3
  PHYS 241                 4             PHYS 142                 2
  ECE 220a                 4             ECE 220b                 4
  OPTI 210                 3             OPTI 226                 3
  OPTI 210L                1             OPTI 226L                1
                                         SIE 270                  3
                                         ECE 275                  3
  Total                    16            Total                    19

Junior Year

MATH 322 3 PHYS 242 3 ECE 274 3 ECE 352 3 ECE 320 3 ECE 381 3 ECE 351a 3 OPTI 342 3 OPTI 350 3 OPTI 370 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective 3 Total 18 Total 18

Senior Year

OPTI 412 3 OPTI 416 4 OPTI 470a 3 OPTI 470b 3 Tech. Elective* 9 Tech. Elective* 6 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective 4 Total 15 Total 17

Total Credit Hours 136

*Six units of Technical Electives must consist of two courses from the list: ECE 340, 351b, 425, 430, 434, 456, 459, 482, 487, SIE 230; or one course from this list and its 300-level prerequisite. The remaining nine units may satisfy this rule or be chosen from the union of this list and other 400-level courses in engineering, mathematics, optical sciences or physics. Each student is required to complete 16 units of engineering design.

Bachelor of Science in Systems Engineering
(ABET ACCREDITED)

Systems engineers design and build systems to meet the needs of people. As computing speed and analytic sophistication have increased, society's needs have become more varied and complex. Graduates of the systems engineering program are prepared to face these needs.

The goal of a systems engineer is to make the best use of resources. Stated formally, systems engineering is concerned with the processes and methodology of modeling, analyzing and designing technologically advanced systems that function safely, effectively, and economically. It requires appreciation and understanding of machines, people, software, hardware, materials, and energy. Systems engineers work on a wide range of activities and applications, including communication systems, computer networking, manufacturing systems, robotics, transportation systems, health-care systems, societal problems and all phases of both industrial and military research and design. To prepare students for careers of such exceptional diversity, the systems engineering curriculum includes operations research, probability and statistics, numerical computing methods, artificial intelligence courses, robotics, and human factors. This is clearly a broader program than most traditional engineering disciplines.

Since computing and related methodology are invariably an integral part of modern systems engineering, the department offers a software option within the systems engineering curriculum. The option is exercised by taking the courses indicated in brackets below.

Required Curriculum:

                         Sophomore Year 

First Semester Second Semester

Course Units Course Units MATH 223 4 MATH 254 3 PHYS 241 4 PHYS 142 2 SIE 250 3 SIE 265 3 SIE 270 3 ENGR Sci. Elec[C SC 227]* 3 ECON 210 3 PSYC 101 3 Total 17 Total 14

Junior Year

SIE 305 3 SIE 321 3 ENGR Sci. Elective* 3 SIE 330R,330L 4 SIE 340 3 SIE 350 3 ECE 207 3 SIE 370 4 MATH Elective [C SC 342]* 3 ENGL 308 3 Total 15 Total 17

Senior Year

SIE 431 3 SIE 411 4 SIE 453 3 SIE 442 3 SIE 495s 1 Tech. Elective**[Software Elect.]* 3 SIE Elect. [SIE 474]* 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective*** 6 Tech. Elective** 3 Hum./Soc. Sci. Elective*** 3 Total 16 Total 16

*Four course substitutions as indicated within the brackets are required for the software systems engineering option.

**Technical electives and MATH electives must be chosen from lists of 300- or 400-level courses available in the department office and must be approved by the student's faculty advisor. The SIE elective and technical electives must be chosen to include a total of at least 1 unit of Engineering Design and 2 units of Engineering Science. SIE 422 and 474 individually satisfy these requirements.

***Hum. and soc. sci. electives must be chosen from a list approved by the College
of Engineering and Mines, and satisfy sequence requirements. Consult your faculty
advisor.