ARTS AND SCIENCES

Fine Arts + Humanities + Science + Social and Behavioral Sciences

Introduction

As the most comprehensive academic division of The University of Arizona, Arts and Sciences subsumes four units: Fine Arts, Humanities, Science, and Social and Behavioral Sciences. All B.A. and B.S. students in these four units share a single general education program. 

FINE ARTS

Music Building, Room 111
(520) 621-1301

Professional programs offered in Fine Arts educate the thinkers and practitioners who will define the emerging standards for the arts. The University provides a rich environment for training, research and experimentation in the arts directed by a faculty of practicing professionals and scholars. In Fine Arts, independent artists and scholars revitalize their skills and generate innovative methods and aesthetic concepts. Fine Arts also provides training and resources based on formal tradition and cultural heritage as a means to interpret and create in our contemporary society.

The academic commitment of the arts is to audiences as well as artists, to community as well as students, to culture as well as curriculum. Access to the knowledge found in the arts must be available to all of society.

SCHOOL: School of Music

DEPARTMENTS: Art, Media Arts, Theatre Arts

COMMITTEE: Committee on Dance

MAJORS AND DEGREES:

Art Education (B.F.A.)

Art History (B.A. in Art)

Composition (B.M.)

Dance (B.F.A.)

Fine Arts Studies (B.F.A.)

Jazz Studies (B.M.)

Media Arts (B.F.A., B.A. in Media Arts)

Music (B.A. in Music)

Music Education (B.M.)

Musical Theatre (B.F.A.)

Performance (B.M.)

Studio Art (B.F.A.)

Theatre Arts (B.A. in Theatre Arts)

Theatre Arts Education (B.F.A.)

Theatre Production (B.F.A.)

HONOR SOCIETIES, PROFESSIONAL AND HONORARY ASSOCIATIONS:

American Guild of Organists-Student Chapter

American Musicological Society-Student Chapter

Dancers' Consortium

Kappa Kappa Psi-Band Fraternity for Men

Music Educators National Conference-Student Chapter

Music Teachers National Association-Student Chapter

National Association of Television Arts and Sciences-Student Chapter

Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Fraternity of America-Men's National Professional Music Society

Pi Kappa Delta-National Speech Honorary

Sigma Alpha Iota-Women's National Music Honorary

Tau Beta Sigma-Band Fraternity for Women

Theta Alpha Phi-Honorary Fraternity for Theatre Arts

HUMANITIES

Modern Languages Building, Room 345
(520) 621-1044

The humanities sustain the ongoing conversations of different cultures. Humanities offers programs dedicated to literature, literacy, language-learning and cross-cultural understanding. Its courses promote critical and creative thinking by (1) cultivating literacy in its many forms, especially in writing and the analysis of various literatures; (2) opening up other languages to non-native speakers; and (3) developing greater understanding of the histories, varieties and transformations of different human cultures. Humanities is composed of seven departments of language and literatures, as well as several interdisciplinary programs, and offers degrees in more than 13 languages. It also supports special emphases in creative writing, English as a second language, religious studies, comparative cultural and literary studies, and classical archaeology, as well as public programs offered by the Poetry Center and the Humanities Seminars.

DEPARTMENTS: Classics, East Asian Studies, English, French and Italian, German Studies, Russian and Slavic Languages, Spanish and Portuguese

COMMITTEES: African American Studies*, Religious Studies, Critical Languages, Russian and Soviet Studies

GRADUATE COLLEGE INTERDISCIPLINARY COMMITTEES:
Comparative Cultural and Literary Studies, Second Language Acquisition and Teaching

MAJORS AND DEGREES:

Classics (B.A.)

Creative Writing (B.A.)**

East Asian Studies (B.A.)

English (B.A.)

French (B.A.)

German (B.A.)

Greek (B.A.)***

Italian (B.A.)

Latin (B.A.)**

Portuguese (B.A.)

Religious Studies (B.A.)


Russian (B.A.)

Russian and Soviet Studies (B.A.)

Spanish (B.A.)

*A minor only is available in African American Studies

**Listed under English

***Listed under Classics

HONOR SOCIETIES, PROFESSIONAL AND HONORARY ASSOCIATIONS:

Delta Phi Alpha National Honorary-German

Dobro Slovo-Russian and Slavic Languages

Phi Beta Kappa-National Honor Society

Pi Delta Phi-French

Sigma Delta Pi-Spanish and Portuguese

SCIENCE

Gould-Simpson Building, Room 1025
(520) 621-4090

Science conducts programs of education and research in fields of study spanning the biological, mathematical and physical sciences. The emphases are on teaching a fundamental understanding of scientific knowledge, the discovery of new knowledge, the synthesis of new understandings about the natural world and mathematics, and the application of that knowledge to solving important problems and to advancing society's interests.

Comprehensive educational programs in most Science departments encompass both undergraduate and graduate education. Most departments offer degrees at the Bachelor's, Master's, and Doctoral levels. At all levels, there is emphasis on including students-undergraduate and graduate students-as participants in ongoing research programs, exploring the frontiers of human knowledge; highly motivated students, who believe that they can gain from such intensive research experiences, are strongly encouraged to participate.

Science undergraduate education seeks to graduate students fully prepared to take on the most challenging and productive roles at the forefront of technical industry and business, or for the many who choose it to continue their educations in the best and most challenging graduate programs. Science departments also offer a comprehensive selection of introductory and advanced courses in science and mathematics for those students needing such courses in support of technical educations being pursued in other parts of the University. The science faculty also teaches a large number of specially de-signed general education courses aimed at fostering a broad understanding of scientific knowledge and its relationship to other human endeavors.

DEPARTMENTS: Astronomy, Atmospheric Sciences, Biochem-istry, Chemistry, Computer Science, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Geosciences, Mathematics, Molecular and Cellular Biology, Physics, Planetary Sciences, Speech and Hearing Sciences, Statistics

INSTITUTES/RESEARCH UNITS: Institute of Atmosphere Physics, Lunar & Planetary Laboratory, Multiple Mirror Telescope Observatory, Steward Observatory, Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research

CENTERS: Flandrau Science Center and Planetarium

MAJORS AND DEGREES:

Astronomy (B.S.)

Atmospheric Sciences (B.S.)

Biochemistry (B.A., B.S.)

Chemistry (B.A., B.S.)

Computer Science (B.S.)

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (B.A., B.S.)

General Biology (B.S.)

Geosciences (B.S. in Geosciences)

Interdisciplinary Studies (B.A.)

Mathematics (B.A., B.S.)

Molecular and Cellular Biology (B.S.)

Physics (B.S.)

Speech and Hearing Sciences (B.S. in Speech and

Hearing Sciences)

HONOR SOCIETIES, PROFESSIONAL AND HONORARY ASSOCIATIONS:

Alpha Chi Sigma-Chemistry

American Geophysical Union-Atmospheric Sciences

American Meteorological Society-Atmospheric Sciences

National Student Speech-Language-Hearing

Association-Speech and Hearing Sciences

Phi Beta Kappa-National Honor Society

Pi Mu Epsilon-Mathematics

Sigma Gamma Epsilon-Geosciences


Sigma Pi Sigma-Physics

Sigma Xi-Scientific Research

Society for Earth Sciences Students-Geosciences

Society of Physics Students-Physics

Society of Women Engineers Student Chapter-Statistics

Tau Beta Pi-Engineering

SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

Douglass Building, Room 200W
(520) 621-1112

Social and Behavioral Sciences offers a selective suite of distinguished educational, research and applied programs focusing on the understanding of human beings, the groups they form, and the societies and cultures they create. The departments and programs within Social and Behavioral Sciences provide not only disciplinary degrees but also various interdisciplinary majors and minors. The unit promotes fundamental research in individual behavior, cultural expression, social organization, theory and values as well as public and private policy. The strength of this unit in the traditional academic disciplines is enriched by programs extending across Social and Behavioral Sciences and beyond its boundaries. Building on its academic expertise and excellent teaching programs, Social and Behavioral Sciences actively contribute to the cultural, social and economic development of the regional and global community.

SCHOOL: School of Library Science

DEPARTMENTS: Anthropology, Communication, Geography and Regional Development, History, Journalism, Linguistics, Near Eastern Studies, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology

COMMITTEES: Judaic Studies, Women's Studies

GRADUATE COLLEGE INTERDISCIPLINARY COMMITTEES:

Cognitive Science, Latin American Studies

INSTITUTES: Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, Social and Behavioral Sciences Research Institute, Southwest Institute for Research on Women

CENTERS: Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Latin American Area Center, Mexican American Studies and Research Center, Center for Southwest Studies

MAJORS AND DEGREES:

Anthropology (B.A.)

Communication (B.A.)

Economics (B.A.)*

Geography (B.A.)

History (B.A.)

Journalism (B.A.)

Judaic Studies (B.A.)

Latin American Studies (B.A.)

Linguistics (B.A.)

Mexican American Studies (B.A.)

Near Eastern Studies (B.A.)

Philosophy (B.A.)

Political Science (B.A.)

Psychology (B.A., B.S.)

Regional Development (B.S.)

Sociology (B.A.)

Women's Studies (B.A.)

*In economics, a department in the College of Business and Public Administration, students select either a B.A. or a B.S.B.A. program of study.

HONOR SOCIETIES, PROFESSIONAL AND HONORARY ASSOCIATIONS:

Alpha Kappa Delta (Alpha Chapter)-Sociology

Gamma Theta Upsilon-Geography and Regional Development

Kappa Tau Alpha-Journalism

Latin American Studies Association-Latin American Area Center

Phi Alpha Theta-History

Phi Beta Kappa-National Honor Society

Phi Sigma Alpha-Political Science

Psi Chi National Honorary-Psychology

Society of Professional Journalists-Student Chapter

Special Programs

3/2 Program

This is a cooperative academic plan developed by Arts and Sciences and the College of Business, and approved by the Graduate College.

The 3/2 Program offers highly qualified Arts and Sciences students the opportunity to earn both an undergraduate and Master of Business Administration degree in 5 years. The student first completes 3 years of coursework, meeting general education requirements, selected prerequisite courses, and the requirements of the major field of study. The Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) is taken, and application to the 3/2 Program is made during the second semester of the junior year. Qualified students are accepted for the senior year with continued study in 30 units of designated MBA courses. The 30 MBA units are used within the undergraduate degree program as the minor, as elective units or as excess units. Upon completion of all degree requirements, the baccalaureate degree is awarded. Admission to the Graduate College to complete the MBA is based upon compliance with Graduate College requirements and procedures, and a minimum grade-point average of 3.00 in the 30 units of completed MBA classes.

Additional information is available through advisors in Arts and Sciences and in the Graduate Professional Programs Office, College of Business.

Prelaw Program

A broad liberal education is considered an excellent preparation for a career in law. Recommended courses are those that strengthen communication, analytical and research skills, along with courses that provide an understanding of social, political and economic institutions. Legal internships are available that contribute to the development of law-related skills and insights. However, there is not a specific prelaw curriculum. Law school deans encourage prelaw students to choose a major that reflects their interests and abilities, offers the functional skills necessary for a law career or builds a foundation for a legal specialty.

Law schools accredited by the American Bar Association require a bachelor's degree for admission. Specific criteria assessed by law schools include: student's score on the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT), undergraduate grade-point average, community and college extracurricular activities, volunteer or work experience, letters of recommendation and a student's personal statement (written essay). The preparation process begins during the freshman year with course selection and culminates in the fall of the senior year with the application process.

Freshmen are encouraged to test their commitment to a legal career and to examine all degree options before choosing a major. During the first year of undergraduate study, students can make an appointment with the prelaw advisor in Arts and Sciences for assistance in planning a program. In addition, the prelaw advisor is able to answer questions about the law school admission process, the LSAT, visits of law school representatives and the prelaw student associations, Phi Alpha Delta and Minority Prelaw Students Association.

In recent years, from 60 to 70 percent of the UA graduates who applied to law school have been accepted.

Prehealth Program

The Prehealth Professions Program assists students from all colleges of the University who are interested in the fields of medicine, dentistry, optometry and podiatry. Services are available for all students, from entering freshmen to seniors, including graduate students and returning students who have a degree and are completing professional program admission requirements.

Premedicine is not a formal major. While most premeds major in the sciences, particularly biochemistry or molecular and cellular biology, a science major is not a prerequisite for admission to medical school. Students are encouraged to major in any area of interest, as medical schools are seeking applicants with a broad liberal arts background. Non-science majors, however, are advised to minor in a science as the nine upper division science units, when added to the core prerequisites, will better prepare them for medical school.

All U.S. medical, dental, osteopathy and podiatry schools require for admission: 1 year of general biology (MCB 181-182); 1 year of general chemistry (CHEM 103a/b and 104a/b); 1 year of organic chemistry (CHEM 241a/b and 243a/b); and 1 year of physics (PHYS 102a/b or 104a/b and 180a/b or PHYS 110 and 116). A few of these schools also require a semester of calculus (MATH 124 or 125a). Schools of optometry have several additional requirements. Information is available in the Prehealth Professions Office, Modern Languages Building, Room 347.

When evaluating an applicant, health professions schools seriously consider the cumulative grade-point average. The average GPA of UA graduates accepted to medical school is 3.5; to dental and optometry schools, 3.2; and to podiatry schools, 3.0. Improved performance, such as a rising GPA after a poor freshman year, are taken into consideration.

A second major factor in selection is the score acquired on the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), Dental Admission Test (DAT), or the Optometry Admission Test (OAT). These exams are taken in the spring of the junior year or in the fall of the senior year.

Clinical experience, letters of recommendation, community service, extracurricular activities and interviews are also factors in the selection process.

The prehealth professional advisor is available by appointment. In addition, general information meetings are held each semester for freshmen and sophomores so that they can be apprised of preparation for professional school. In November, a registration meeting is held for all juniors interested in the health professions. Following this meeting, registered students are notified about a series of seminars, approximately one per month, on various professional application issues. Students are assisted in such issues as writing their personal statements, preparing for interviews and filling out the application forms. Applicants may request an interview and a composite recommendation from the Prehealth Professions Committee, composed of University faculty, staff and administrators. The Committee recommendation, in conjunction with individual letters solicited by the student, form the student's recommendation file. These recommendations are sent to the schools when requested by the student.

The prehealth professions advisor is assisted by a team of premed peer advisors. They are seniors currently applying to health professions schools, and are available to all students daily on a walk-in basis.

Underrepresented minority students, including Native Americans, Hispanics and African Americans, are actively recruited by health professions schools. The Minority Premed Club and the Minority Recruitment Project, sponsored by the College of Medicine, are available, in addition to the Prehealth Professions Office, to encourage minority applicants.

DEGREES AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Undergraduate Degrees

Ten undergraduate degrees are offered: Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), Bachelor of Science (B.S.), Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.), Bachelor of Music (B.M.), Bachelor of Arts in Art, Bachelor of Arts in Music, Bachelor of Arts in Media Arts, Bachelor of Arts in Theatre Arts, Bachelor of Science in Geosciences, and Bachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Sciences.

The Interdisciplinary Studies major for the Bachelor of Arts degree and the General Fine Arts Studies degree for the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree are described later in this section.

Graduate Degrees

Most departments in Arts and Sciences offer programs leading to master's and doctoral degrees. See the Graduate Catalog for detailed information.

Requirements for Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Degrees

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degrees include:


1. 125 units.

2. The general education requirements.

3. The requirements of at least one major and a minor (see inter-disciplinary studies major for its requirements).

4. 30 units of University Credit (for definition of University
Credit see the Academic Policies and Graduation Requirements section of this catalog), including 18 of the last 30 units offered toward the degree.

5. 15 units of University Credit in the major and 9 units in the minor.

6. 2.000 grade-point average in the major and for all University
Credit course work.

7. 42 upper-division units.

8. Upper-division Writing Proficiency Examination.

9. A junior or senior level "Writing-Emphasis Course" (see Aca-demic Guidelines section).

10. A minimum of 90 units in Arts and Sciences courses (up to 30 units of economics may be included).

11. All other college and University requirements for graduation. (For explanation of University graduation requirements see the Academic Policies and Graduation Requirements section of this catalog).

Note: No more than 48 units within the major may be applied toward the degree. That applies to Honors courses in the major and courses cross-listed with an academic committee or center (African American Studies, American Indian Studies, Judaic Studies, Latin American Studies, Mexican American Studies, Religious Studies, Russian and Soviet Studies and Women's Studies). Excluded from the 48-unit rule are freshman composition, the first year (elementary) of a foreign language (see departmental headings for exceptions) and courses cross-listed with a second academic department if the latter is the home department.

The Department of English offers majors in English and creative writing, allowing a student to major and minor or double major within one department. For details see an advisor in the English Department.

Requirements for Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) and Bachelor of Music (B.M.) Degrees

In addition to the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), Fine Arts offers the Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) and the Bachelor of Music (B.M.) degrees.

Requirements for the B.F.A. include:

1. 125 - 129 units, depending on major area of study.

2. The general education requirements.

3. Courses to complete a major (no minor is required).

4. 30 units of University Credit (for definition see the Academic Policies and Graduation Requirements section of this catalog) including 18 of the last 30 units offered toward the degree.

5. 15 units of University Credit in the major.

6. 2.000 grade average in the major and for all University Credit course work.

7. 42 upper-division units.

8. Upper-division Writing Proficiency Examination.


9. A junior or senior level "Writing-Emphasis Course" (see Academic Policies and Graduation Requirements section of this catalog).

10. All other college and University requirements for graduation. (For explanation of University graduation requirements, see the Academic Policies and Graduation Requirements section of this catalog.)

Requirements for the B.M. include:

1. 125 to 133 units, depending on emphasis area chosen by the student.

2. The general education requirements.

3. Courses to complete the major.

4. 30 units of University Credit (for definition see the Academic Policies and Graduation Requirements section of this catalog), including 18 of the last 30 units offered toward the degree.

5. Any University Credit requirements of the specific major.

6. 2.000 grade-point average in the major and for all University Credit course work.

7. 42 upper-division units.

8. All other University, college and School of Music requirements for graduation. (For explanation of University graduation requirements, see the Academic Policies and Grad-
uation Requirements
section of this catalog.)

The Major

THE MAJOR FOR HUMANITIES, SCIENCE, AND SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES-The undergraduate academic programs listed above as majors and degrees under these units are open to all students. A major is a method of organizing studies around a single discipline. These in-depth studies provide a sense of the growth and evolution of knowledge, its complexity and limitations, and its method of training in critical analysis and the solving of problems. Although the major may or may not determine one's career, it is the cornerstone of an undergraduate degree program. It should reflect postgraduate options and personal, career and life considerations. Each department provides an advisor to help its majors select courses in the major and in a minor.

THE MAJOR FOR FINE ARTS-Fine Arts requires students to declare a degree program at the time of application for admission to the University or upon entrance into Fine Arts. Students can file a change in major at any time upon approval of the Office of the Dean. Students choose a major advisor in the selected department upon declaring a major. For general fine arts studies, advising is provided in the Music Building, Room 113.

The course and total-unit requirements for majors are specified by individual departments in the Departments and Courses of Instruction section of this catalog. Course work used to satisfy other graduation requirements cannot be used to satisfy requirements of the major. Students must obtain a grade-point average of 2.000 or better for all work in the major.

For graduation with bachelor degrees other than the Bachelor of Fine Arts and the Bachelor of Music degrees, students must complete the general education requirements, a major, a minor and appropriate electives. Bachelor of Arts degrees are offered with majors in art history, media arts, music and theatre arts.

For graduation with Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Music degrees, students must complete the general education requirements, a major and appropriate electives. Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees are offered with majors in studio art, art education, dance, theatre production, theatre education, musical theatre and general fine arts studies; Bachelor of Music degrees are offered with majors in performance, music education, composition and jazz studies. For B.F.A. and B.M. degrees, at least 45 general academic units must be taken outside the major department. The general education requirements are counted toward these 45 outside units. Students majoring in art education, theatre education or music education must complete at least 56 units applicable to the degree with a grade-point average of 2.500 or better, and must obtain written permission from the Office of Student Services, College of Education, before being admitted to certain professional education courses. (See the College of Education section of this catalog for additional details.)

The B.F.A. degree with a major in general fine arts studies combines general education requirements with concentrated study and participation in selected fine arts fields. For information regarding the specific requirements for this major, please refer to the General Education section below. Students pursuing this degree must take at least 45 units outside Fine Arts.

Fine Arts students are encouraged to participate in both on-campus and nondepartmental, off-campus productions and performances. Participation cannot conflict, however, with commitments already made to departmental programs and to student colleagues in those programs. When such conflicts are imminent, students are responsible for consulting in advance with their department head or director.

THE MAJOR FOR ARTS AND SCIENCES-The Interdisciplinary Studies major (IDS) is offered within Arts and Sciences for the Bachelor of Arts degree. It permits a student to combine three disciplines into a coherent and intellectually challenging major. Designing the major requires that the student: (1) construct the program of study with the aid of an Arts and Sciences advisor and a committee constructed from a faculty member in each of the three disciplines chosen; (2) prepare a written proposal; and (3) have the final proposal and program accepted by the committee. Each change in proposal must also be approved by the faculty committee and the Arts and Sciences advisor.

Requirements include:

1. All general education requirements

2. 24 units within each of three subject areas

3. 125 total units for the B.A. Degree

4. 42 upper-division units

5. 12 upper-division units in each subject area

6. 90 units in Arts and Sciences courses

7. 12 University units in each subject area

8. A 2.0 GPA in each subject area and cumulatively

Entry to the interdisciplinary studies major follows the completion of 30 units. Application for the degree must be filed by no later than the end of the fourth week of the semester preceding the semester of graduation. For the purpose of this degree, an August graduation will be treated as a May graduation.

Subject areas I and II must be in a single programs or majors in which a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree is offered, or in the structured program of an academic committee within one of the four units in Arts and Sciences (i.e. Fine Arts, Humanities, Science and Social and Behavioral Sciences).

Subject area III may include courses from these four units or from another UA college. Courses in area III must be selected from no more than two related academic disciplines (divided equally), or from an approved combination of courses united by a common theme. In a foreign language, only upper division course work may be used in split area III program. Certain courses may not be used in any IDS area: freshman composition, courses below MATH 124, military or naval science, activity courses in exercise and sport sciences and first year courses in foreign languages and American Sign Language. Reminder: a maximum of 10 units of general education coursework can be used to fulfill all other graduation requirements (i.e., major, minor, IDS subject areas).

DOUBLE MAJOR-A student may create a double major by satisfying all of the requirements for the major in two departments within Arts and Sciences. Both majors must lead to the same degree-B.A., B.S., B.F.A. or B.M. A minor will be allowed. A double major is available within the Department of English in English and creative writing. It is essential to maintain contact with the advisor in each department to ensure that all requirements are being met. Both majors are declared on the Change of Major form and when filing for degree candidacy. The minimum units required for graduation are 125, with at least 15 units in each major taken as University Credit course work. The student must earn whatever number of units is required by a selected major. Those students interested in the double major with a B.A. or B.S. degree should meet with an advisor in Arts and Sciences; those students interested in the double major with a B.F.A or B.M. degree should go to the Fine Arts Dean's office.

The Minor

The Minor for B.A. and B.S. Programs-A 20-unit minor is required in Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degree programs. Exceptions are made for a double major, the interdisciplinary studies major, the Bachelor of Arts with a major in Latin American studies, and the Bachelor of Science in Geosciences. Most departments list suggested core courses for a minor. Transfer students may discuss with the major advisor use of prior coursework for the minor.

Some departments permit a split minor (a minimum of 8 units in one department and 12 units in another department) or a thematic minor. The thematic minor is developed around a theme identified by the student, using courses from three or more disciplines. A thematic minor form must be submitted at the time of application for degree certification.

Requirements for a minor: (1) at least 20 units, and (2) at least nine units of upper-division University Credit (except for a Japanese language minor, when the student is not using the language to satisfy the second language requirement in gen-eral education. See the Department of East Asian Studies for information.) Excluded from the minor: freshman composition, courses below Math 124, military aerospace studies, military or naval science, activity courses in exercise and sports science, and first-year courses in foreign language and Ameri-can Sign Language that are also used to satisfy the second language requirement in general education. Reminder: a maximum of 10 units of general education coursework can be used to fulfill all other graduation requirements (i.e., major, minor, IDS subject areas).

THE MINOR FOR FINE ARTS-The minor complements the major area of study and is an essential component of the bachelor of arts degree programs in Fine Arts. The required 20-unit minimum minor usually is completed in a department related to the major. The minor must be approved by the major advisor, who also advises the student in the minor area of study. Minors are structured by some departments; information can be found in the departmental listings in this catalog and by contacting the major advisor. In general, completion of the minor can be accomplished in one of the following ways:

1. Twenty units in one department;

2. A split minor of work done in two departments, with at least 8 units in one and 12 units in the other;

3. A fine arts minor, composed of a broad survey of courses outside of the major department, which must include 6 to 9 units from three of the following departments: art, dance, media arts, music, theatre arts;

4. A teaching minor for education majors (specific requirements described in the departmental sections of this catalog).

Course work used to satisfy other graduation requirements cannot be applied to the requirements of the minor.

Fine Arts Studies

The fine arts studies major, offered by Fine Arts for the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, combines general education requirements with concentrated study and participation in selected fine arts fields. For information regarding the specific requirements for this major, please refer to General Education section below.

Second Degree

A second degree may be earned (e.g., B.A. and B.S.) by completing no fewer than 30 units in addition to the units required for the first degree, and meeting all general education and major requirements for the second degree.

Those students interested in a second degree that is a B.A. or B.S. should meet with an advisor in Arts and Sciences. Those students interested in a second degree that is a B.F.A. or B.M should meet with an advisor in the Fine Arts Dean's office.

GENERAL EDUCATION

B.A. and B.S. General Education Requirements

The General Education Program for B.A. and B.S. students in Arts and Sciences is designed to afford students the opportunity to learn how different disciplines define, acquire and organize knowledge; this is accomplished by the program's breadth, involving courses ranging from physics to poetry. The program is intended, as well, to enhance understanding of the reciprocal influences of Western and non-Western cultures, so the tradition and cultures requirement lies at the heart of general education. In addition, the general education courses are meant to develop analytic, synthetic, linguistic and computational skills useful for lifelong learning; this is the motivation behind the proficiency segment of the program. Finally, the program is constructed to provide a common foundation for wide ranging dialogue with peers, and to encourage personal qualities, such as a critical and inquiring attitude, an appreciation of complexity and ambiguity, a tolerance for and empathy with persons of different backgrounds or values, and a deepened sense of self so students will be able to respond more fully and effectively to an increasingly complex world.

The following information, under the title Booklink, is available for purchase in the ASUA Bookstore. An addendum to Booklink, which lists courses approved after the catalog is printed, is included in Booklink or is independently available in Arts and Sciences. Booklink is also supplemented by Booklink Supplement, which provides a detailed description of all general education courses, and by a newsletter produced every semester that lists the courses offered that semester. Booklink Supplement can be purchased at the ASUA Bookstore; the newsletter is free and can be picked up in Arts and Sciences.

The requirements consist of two parts. You must: (1) demonstrate basic proficiency in English composition, mathematics and a second language; and (2) complete course requirements in four study areas - Traditions and Cultures; Biological and Physical Sciences; Individuals, Societies and Institutions; and Arts and Literature.


I. BASIC PROFICIENCIES

        A. Composition                                     6 units
        B. Mathematics                                     3 units
        C. Second Language                                 *

II. STUDY AREAS

A. Traditions and Cultures 9 units B. Biological and Physical Sciences 8 units C. Individuals, Societies and Institutions 9 units D. The Arts and Literature 6 units *Fourth-semester proficiency is required. For most languages, this equals 16 units of coursework; for some languages, this equals as many as 20 units. It is possible for a student who fulfills the language requirement by examination to have no University of Arizona units in a second language.

In addition, please note:

A course satisfying a general education requirement must be taken for a grade.

Any course accepted for general education, including SER 370a-b and 431a-b, counts towards the minimum 90 units required in Arts and Sciences for all B.A. or B.S. students.

A maximum of 10 units of general education coursework can be used to fulfill all other graduation requirements (i.e., major, minor, IDS subject areas).

I. BASIC PROFICIENCIES

Courses included in the Basic Proficiency group will ensure that you acquire intellectual tools and skills fundamental both to University study and to successful daily living. Effective use of written English, a command of mathematical theory and practice adequate to contemporary life, and a working knowledge of a second language involve not only vital skills, but constitute, in and of themselves, rigorous intellectual endeavors.

Mastery of them is the foundation for the General Education Program; therefore students should arrange to complete the basic proficiencies as early as possible. The composition and mathematics requirements should be satisfied during the first year of an undergraduate program. The second language requirement should be begun no later than the first year and completed no later than the end of the second year.

The student must take and abide by the results of any mandatory examinations (placement-proficiency) given by the appropriate department prior to enrollment in any of the proficiency courses. In addition, the student may satisfy any of the three proficiency requirements by any examinations authorized by the departments for these courses.

A. English Composition

All freshmen must enroll in one of the following three sequences:

1.English 100 (exposition, review of syntax and usage),
English 101 (exposition, emphasis on essays) and
English 102 (critical papers on selected subjects);

2. English 101 and English 102;

3. English 103H (honors) and English 104H (honors).

Placement is based on scores resulting from the UA Freshman Composition Placement Exam, and the English section of the ACT or the Test of Standard Written English portion of the SAT.

B. Mathematics
College Algebra (MATH 117R or 117S), or any three-unit Mathematics course numbered above 117R or 117S is required of all students. Entry-level mathematics students will be advised to choose one of three strands according to their interests, preparation and intended major. The three strands are:

G (General Knowledge): This strand involves a general understanding and appreciation of how mathematics is used to solve problems in everyday life, as for example, the mathematics of voting and elections or of networks and paths.

M (Moderate Knowledge): This strand involves reasonable facility with algebra and algebraic functions, graphs and simple modeling.

S (Substantial Knowledge): This strand involves skill and facility with calculus.

All strands presume that students will have completed the high school mathematics required for entry to the University.

Choice of a strand entails certain course choices. The G-strand includes a single class - MATH 122 (Mathematics in Modern Society). NOTE: This choice does not prepare a student for any further mathematically-based work; it is a terminal course. The S-strand begins at one of two calculus I options - MATH 124 (Calculus with Applications) or MATH 125a (Calculus). Students then may continue on to 125b, 223 or beyond. Those who are not ready to start the S-strand will be required to take prepatory work. The M-strand is for students who require mathematical facility at the level of at least MATH 117S or R (College Algebra) or MATH 121 (Collegiate Algebra). Further mathematical work may include MATH 119 (Finite Mathematics), MATH 123 (Elements of Calculus), or a statistics class from outside the Mathematics Department.

Each major will indicate the mathematics strand that is most appropriate for their students. Because the S-strand presumes the M-strand and the M-strand presumes the G-strand, students will retain the most flexibility in their major choice by aiming for the most mathematic knowledge. A student who chooses to meet the general education mathematics requirement with the G-strand, for instance, will have the most restricted set of major choices available

The Math Readiness Test is required of all students prior to enrolling in any math course numbered below 125b. Test scores are valid for one year. (See Academic Policies and Grad-uation Requirements.)

C. Second Language

All students must be proficient in a second language at the fourth semester level. You may demonstrate proficiency in one of the following ways.

1. Successful completion of a fourth semester course taught in the language;

2. Successful completion of the second semester of an intensive language course;

3. Through an examination administered by the appropriate UA language unit.

Students whose first language is not English may satisfy this requirement by examination in that language. They may not, however, receive University Credit for their proficiency. A student who is interested in demonstrating native proficiency should contact Arts and Sciences for advice as to how to proceed.

American Sign Language satisfies the second language requirement. The sign language course sequence includes SER 370a, 370b, 431a and 431b.

Transfer credit is allowed only for courses taken at the college level (as defined by the specific department). Arts and Sciences departments may require or recommend specific languages in support of their major or preferred minor.

The composition and mathematics requirements should be satisfied during the first year of an undergraduate program. The second language requirement should be begun as well during the first year.

II. STUDY AREAS

The Study Area courses encourage the investigation of relations among and between disciplines. In seeking to identify similarities and differences in subject matter, methods, aims and results of the various approaches to knowledge, the student will explore the extent to which different modes and forms of knowledge can be integrated, and the ways in which they resist integration. All students should also be able to better understand the segregative boundaries that exist in human society, particularly those that have been maintained arbitrarily on the basis of gender, class, race or ethnic identity. Finally, courses listed among the Study Areas are designed to introduce and epitomize their respective disciplines, so as to enable the student to make informed decisions about majors and careers.

All Study Area courses are expected to include a writing component. Writing in general education courses places students in an active relationship with the body of facts, ideas and theories presented in courses and helps them develop a critical appreciation of the ways knowledge is acquired and used. Writing also develops the attitudes of mind essential to the wise and humane use of knowledge and intellectual skills: respect for evidence, reason and the contingent nature of truth; open-mindedness; motivation, involving personal characteristics such as initiative, curiosity and an appetite for learning; and the willingness to pursue a line of inquiry to its logical conclusion. Each department develops the specific purposes and kinds of writing required in their general education courses, so that students understand the standard features of strong writing across disciplines and the aspects of writing that vary according to discipline. However, midterm and final examinations are not deemed sufficient for this requirement, even when they include essay questions. In science courses lab reports may be an essential skill, while students in the performing arts may be expected to write critiques of performances. Students in humanities or social science may be expected to write critical and theoretical essays. Most important is that the writing assignments are relevant to the discipline and appropriate to the course level.

These requirements may be fulfilled during any semester of the undergraduate years. However, the Biological and Physical Science requirement should be completed as soon as possible after establishing mathematical competency, and the majority of Traditions and Cultures courses are aimed at lower division students.

At least one course in a student's Study Area courses must focus systematically on gender, class, race or ethnicity. Such courses are marked with an asterisk (*).

Transfer credit may be allowed for courses in which equivalency has been established. (See also Transfer Students and General Education below.)

A. Traditions and Cultures

Fundamental to this study area is the awareness that our place in the world is determined by two distinct forces. We are historical beings, shaped by the experience and acts of our predecessors; in turn we shape the lives of those who follow us. But no simple connection binds us to the past, as we are also profoundly affected by the cultures coexisting with our own.

The internal organization of this Study Area is intended to reinforce the assumption of these two forces. You must take a total of nine units (three courses): three units (one course) from List 1 and a six-unit sequence from List 2. Studied in conjunction, these two course sets provide a greater understanding of the reciprocal influences of Western and Non-Western cultural traditions.

List 1


Native New World

ANTH 205 Prehistoric Peoples of the Southwest

(AINS 205)

*ANTH 206 Native Peoples of the Southwest

(AINS 206)

ANTH 423 Anthropology of Rural Mexico

(AINS/MAS 423)

ANTH 451 Archaeology of North America

*ENGL 477 American Indian Literature (AINS 477)

*LING 210 Native Languages of North America

(AINS 210)

East Asia and the Pacific

ANTH 432 Peoples of the Pacific

CHN 142 Chinese Humanities (RELI 142)

CHN 174 Chinese Civilization (HIST 174)

CHN 375-376 History of China

HIST 270 Modern East Asia (EAS 270)

HIST 272 Japanese Civilization (JPN 272)

HIST 474a-b-c History of Japan (JPN 474a-b-c)

*HIST 489 Women in East Asia

JPN 144 Japanese Humanities (RELI 144)

JPN 145 Popular Culture in Japan

JPN 220 Japanese Religion

NES 170 Indian Civilization (HIST 170)

Africa

FREN 453 Culture and Civilization of North Africa

GEOG 413 Africa

HIST 190 Introduction to African History

Middle East and South Asia

CLAS 334 Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt

(ARH/ANTH 334)

GEOG 469 Geography of the Middle East (NES 469)

JUS 372a-b History and Religion of Ancient Israel

(HIST/RELI/NES 372a-b)

*NES 140 Middle Eastern Humanities (RELI 140)

NES 171 Ancient Civilizations of the Near East

(ANTH/HIST 171)

NES 172 Islamic Civilization: Traditional

and Modern Middle East

(ANTH/HIST 172)

NES 434 Islamic Thought

NES 477a-b History of the Middle East

POL 441 The Arab-Israeli Conflict (NES 441)

Comparative Focus

ANTH 315 World Ethnography

AR H 112 Art in Non-Western Society

HIST 468a-b Asia and the West (NES 468a-b)

MUS 434 Music in World Cultures

POL 270 Colonization and Native Peoples

AINS 270)

List 2


History of Architecture and Western Civilization

ARCH 324 Ancient through Medieval

ARCH 334 Renaissance to Present

The Classical Tradition

CLAS 220 Classical Tradition I

CLAS 221 Classical Tradition II

Critical Concepts in Western Culture

CCLS 200 Critical Concepts in Western

Culture (Topical)

Western Civilization: Literary Perspectives (Honors only)

ENGL 251a Ancient Visions

ENGL 251b The Middle Ages through the

Enlightenment

ENGL 251c 19th and 20th Centuries

Western Civilization and the Arts

either

FA 207 The Twentieth Century

FA 307 Paleolithic through Renaissance

FA 317 Baroque through 19th Century

or

AR H 117 Survey of World Art, Prehistoric-Gothic

AR H 118 Survey of World Art, Renaissance-

20th Century

FA 207 The Twentieth Century

The History of Western Civilization

either

HIST 101 Backgrounds and Formation to 1648

or

HIST 102 Emergence of the Modern World since 1648

and one of

HIST 101 Backgrounds and Formations to 1648

HIST 102 Emergence of the Modern World since 1648

HIST 103 Topical Approaches to Major Issues

HIST 106 History of the United States from

1607 to 1877

HIST 107 History of the United States from

1877 to the present

HIST 160 Colonial Latin America

HIST 161 Modern Latin America

HIST 368 Colonial Mexico

HIST 369 Mexico Since Independence

JUS 377a Modern Israel: the Origins

JUS 377b Modern Israel: 1949 to the Present

Introduction to Humanities

HUM 250a Ancient to early Christian

HUM 250b Medieval to 18th century

HUM 250c Late 18th century to present

Critical Themes in Western Literature and Culture

ENGL 250 Critical Themes in Western Literature and Culture (Topical)

Western Culture: Italian Perspective

ITAL 300a Italian Perspective

ITAL 300b Italian Perspective

Philosophical Foundations of Western Civilization

PHIL 121 Justice and Virtue

PHIL 122 Mind, Matter and God

PHIL 123 Science and Inquiry

B. Biological and Physical Sciences

This Study Area will provide the student with the vocabulary and the facts needed to understand major scientific principles. In addition, it will show how data are collected to test hypotheses, how conclusions from these data can be used to make predictions, construct models, or formulate general theories, and what part skepticism and knowledge of limits play in the interpretation and acceptance of new ideas.

This requirement is to be satisfied by two courses, four units each, which include laboratory work. (In addition to traditional laboratories, courses involving field trips and data analysis/discussion sessions may be considered lab experiences.) Students are strongly encouraged to take either one two-semester sequence in the biological sciences (which includes ecology and evolutionary biology, microbiology, molecular and cellular biology) or one two-semester sequence in the physical sciences (which includes astronomy, atmospheric sciences, chemistry, GEOG 103a and 104a, geosciences, hydrology and water resources, physics, planetary sciences, soil and water science).

ASTR 100/101L Essentials of Astronomy/Laboratory

ASTR 110a-110b Introductory Astronomy

ATMO 171/171L Introduction to Meteorology and

Climatology/Laboratory
(GEOG 171/171L)

CHEM 101a/102a Lectures in General Chemistry/

Laboratory

CHEM 101b/102b Lectures in General Chemistry/

Laboratory

CHEM 103a/104a Fundamentals of Chemistry/Techniques

CHEM 103b/104b Fundamentals of Chemistry/

Techniques

CHEM 105a/106a Honors Fundamentals of Chemistry/

Honors Techniques

CHEM 105b/106b Honors Fundamentals of

Chemistry/Honors Techniques

ECOL 100 Biology Concepts

ECOL 105R/105L Introductory Botany/Laboratory

ECOL 182 Introductory Biology II

(BIOC/MCB/MIC 182)

ECOL 206 Environmental Biology

ENTO 175 Biology of Insect Life

EXSS 120 Human Biology: The Facts of Life

(MCB 120)

GEOG 103a/104a Physical Geography/Laboratory

GEOG 103b/104b Physical Geography/Laboratory

GEOS 101/103 Introduction to Physical Geology/

Introduction to Geosciences
Laboratory

GEOS 102/104 Historical Geology/Laboratory

GEOS 107a/107b Introduction to Global Change

(HWR 107a-107b)

GEOS 110/103 Introduction to Environmental

Geology/Introduction to Geosciences Laboratory

GEOS 112/103 Introduction to Oceanography/

Introduction to

Geosciences Laboratory

HWR 101a/101b Water and the Environment

MSE 257/258 Materials Science of Art and

Archaeological Objects/Laboratory

(ANTH/ENGR 257/258)

MIC 205 Microbiology

PHYS 102/181 Introductory Physics I/Introductory
Laboratory I

PHYS 103/182 Introductory Physics II/Introductory
Laboratory II

PHYS 101 Physics in the Modern World

PHYS 141 Introductory Mechanics

PHYS 151/152 Introduction to Mechanics/Introduction
to Thermodynamics and Relativity

PHYS 251/252 Introduction to Electricity and

Magnetism/Introduction to Optics

and Quantum Theory

PHYS 241 Introductory Electricity and

Magnetism

PTYS 106 Survey of the Solar System

PL S 100/101 Plant Science/Laboratory

SW 105/106 Introduction to Environmental

Science/Laboratory

C. Individuals, Societies and Institutions

Courses in this Study Area afford students an opportunity to examine systematically individual and collective action, and to explore the basic concepts and theories used in analysis of personal, social, cultural, political, economic, philosophical, religious and scientific issues. As a result, they understand more clearly issues of self-identity, social difference, and social status, the role of science in society and the effects of major institutions on individual experiences. This requirement is to be met by taking three three-unit courses, offered in at least two different departments.

AREC 242 World Food Economy

AREC 375 Economics of Land and Water in the

American West (ECON/RNR 375)

*AINS 100 Introduction to American Indian Studies

*AINS 450 American Indian Women (W S 450)

ANTH 101 Introduction to Biological Anthropology and Archaeology

ANTH 102 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology and Linguistic Anthropology

ANTH 110 Exploring Archaeology

ANTH 249 Technology and the Growth of Civilization (HIST 249)

*ANTH 303 Gender and Language (LING/WS 303)

ANTH 307 Ecological Anthropology

*ANTH 316 Political Economy of Language in theSouthwest

*ANTH 319 Mexican American CultureMAS/LAS 319)

*ANTH 405 Urban Adaptation of Ethnic Groups

*ANTH 406 Gender and Social Identity

ANTH 409 Economic Anthropology (ECON/LAS 409)

ANTH 479 Culture and Materials Technology(MSE/ENGR 479)

*ANTH 490 Women in Middle Eastern Society(NES/WS 490)

ASTR 320 Philosophy and History of Astronomical Thought

ATMO 336 Weather, Climate and Society

CLAS 305 Greek and Roman Religion (RELI 305)

CLAS 306 . . . . . . . .The Transformation of a Society

*CLAS 330 Women in Antiquity (HUM/WS 330)

ECON 200 Basic Economic Issues

ECON 371 Economic Development

GEOG 102a-102b Human Geography

GEOG 305 Economic Geography

GEOG 360 Environmental Perception

GEOG 379 Urban Growth and Development

GEOG 411 Middle America (LAS 411)

GEOG 412 South America (LAS 412)

GEOG 456 The American City (PLNG 456)

GEOG 461 Population and Resources(PLNG/HWR 461)

GEOG 464 The Arid and Semiarid Lands

GEOG 488 Governing Science and Technology(ANTH/POL 488)

GEOS 346/346H Mineral and Energy Resources

*HIST 236 Indians in U.S. History

HIST 245 Frontier America

*HIST 253a-b History of Women in the U.S. I-II(WS 253a-b)

HIST 271 The History of Christianity (RELI 271)

*HIST 351 Race and Class in Latin America(AAS/LAS 351)

*HIST 361 History of the U.S.-Mexico Border Region(MAS 361)

*HIST 374 . . . . . . . .The Holocaust

*HIST 489 Women in East Asia (EAS/WS 489)

*HUM 260 Intercultural Perspectives

*JPN 402 Gender and Language in Japan(ANTH/LING 402)

JOUR 151 News in Mass Communications

JOUR 439 Ethics and the News Media (PHIL 439)

JOUR 470 The Press and Society (M AR 470)

LING 101 Introduction to Language

*LING 210 Native Languages of North America(AINS 210)

*LING 320 Language and Social Issues

*LING 425 Language Variation

*MAS 161 Chicanos in American Society (SOC 161)

*MAS 180a-b Introduction to Mexican-American Studies

MCB 404 Contemporary Biology in Human Affairs

M NE 120 Mineral Resources, Geotechnology and the Environment

MSE 486 Technology and Western Society

NEE 109 History of Science and Technology

NURS 487 Poverty and Health

PA 206 Introduction to Public Administration and Policy (POL 206)

*PA 221 Social Welfare Policy

PA 241 Criminal Justice Administration

PHIL 111 Introduction to Philosophy

PHIL 113 Introduction to Moral and Social Philosophy

PHIL 145 Science, Technology and Human Values

PHIL 233 Philosophy of Religion (RELI 233)

PHIL 245 Existential Problems

PHIL 260 Ancient Philosophy (CLAS 260)

PHIL 262 Modern Philosophy

PHIL 305 Introduction to the Philosophy of Science

PHIL 350 Minds, Brains and Computers (PSYC 350)

POL 242 Western European Political Systems

POL 247 Introduction to Latin American Politics

POL 250 Contemporary International Politics

POL 321 Ancient and Medieval Political Theory

POL 322 Early Modern Political Theory

*POL 330 Minority Groups and American Politics(AAS/MAS 330)

*POL 332 Politics of the Mexican-AmericanCommunity (MAS 332)

*POL 334 Politics and American Indians

POL 423 Recent Political Thought

POL 426 American Political Thought

POL 437 Democracies, Emerging and Evolving

POL 447 Latin American Political Development

POL 448 Government and Politics of Mexico(MAS 448)

PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology

*PSYC 216 Psychology of Gender

PSYC 360 Social Psychology

*PSYC 376 Gender and Psychopathology

PSYC 384 Health Psychology

*RELI 225 Introduction to Women and Religion(W S 225)

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology

*SOC 150 Sociology of Women (WS 150)

*SOC 160 Minority Relations and Urban Society(AAS/MAS 160)

SOC 313 Collective Behavior and Social Movements

*SOC 324 Sociology of Sexuality

*SOC 450 Social Stratification (ANTH 450)

*SOC 467 Race and Ethnic Relations

S W 450 Anticipating the Future: Focus on Environment

*W S 100 Introduction to Women's Studies

*W S 200 Women and Western Culture

D. Arts and Literature

The purpose of this study area is to provide students with opportunities to explore the processes by which visual, performing and literary artists produce their works, and to evaluate the significance of those works both metaphorically and in larger cultural contexts.

Students are required to complete three units each in the arts and in literature.

Arts

ARE 130 Appreciating the Visual Arts

ARH 110 Art in Society

ARH 112 Art in Non-Western Society

ART 101 Drawing

ART 102 Color and Design

ART 103 Vision, Voice and Ideology

ART 104 Three Dimensional Design

DNC 100 Looking at Dance

DNC 112a Beginning Ballet (1 unit)

DNC 112b Ballet: Limited Experience (1 unit)

DNC 112c Intermediate Ballet (1 unit)

DNC 143 Improvisation Instruction (1 unit)

DNC 152a Beginning Modern Dance (1 unit)

DNC 152b Modern Dance Limited Experience (1 unit)

DNC 152c Intermediate Modern Dance (2 units)

DNC 175 Theater Dance (1 unit)

DNC 201a Beginning Alignment Floor Barre (1 unit)

DNC 240a,b Ballet Technique I (2 units, 2 units)

DNC 241a,b Dance Technique I: Performance

Foundations (2 units, 2 units)

DNC 244a,b,c,d Jazz Dance Technique

(2 units, 2 units, 2 units, 2 units)

DNC 259 History of Dance

DNC 343a,b,c,d Dance Ensemble

(2 units, 2 units, 2 units, 2 units)

DNC 370 Human Movement in the Arts

*ENGL 449b Folklore: Forms of Nonverbal Folklore(AINS/ANTH 449b)

HUM 295q 10Q4 Creativity (ENGL 295q)

M AR 200 Fundamentals of Theory and Aesthetics in Media Arts

M AR 336 History of Japanese Film

MUS 100 Basic Musicianship

MUS 101a Exploring Music through Piano for the General Student

MUS 107 Survey of Music I

MUS 108 Survey of Music II

MUS 120a Musical Skills and Structure I

MUS 200b,f-s Large Conducted Ensembles (1 unit)

MUS 201a-j Coached Ensembles (1 unit)

MUS 202a,b,f,g Small Conducted Ensembles (1 unit)

MUS 331 Jazz History

MUS 337 Survey of Mexican Folk Music

MUS 360 Music Fundamentals through Experience

MUS 400b-s Large Conducted Ensembles (1 unit)

MUS 401a-d,f,g Coached Ensembles (1 unit)

MUS 402a-d,f,g Small Conducted Ensembles (1 unit)

MUS 428 American Pop Music: Sinatra Era

MUS 444 Arab and Asian Music

T AR 100 Acting for General College Students

T AR 103 Theatre Appreciation

T AR 238 Modern Drama through Performance

T AR 336 Introduction to Shakespeare through

Performance

Literature

*CHN 429 Chinese American Literature 1960-Present

CLAS 342 Homer

CLAS 346 Classical Greek Tragedy

CLAS 348 Myth and Archetype (RELI 348)

ENGL 250 Critical Themes in Western Literature

ENGL 260 Major British Writers

ENGL 261 Modern Literature

ENGL 265 Major American Writers

ENGL 267 World Literature

ENGL 270 Approaches to Literature

ENGL 300 Literature and Film

ENGL 310 Studies in Literary Genre

ENGL 320a-320b Literature of the Bible

ENGL 331 Shakespeare's Major Plays

ENGL 380 Literary Analysis

ENGL 416 Advanced Literary Analysis

ENGL 419b Non-fiction Prose: Other Prose Forms

ENGL 424 Studies in Southwest Literature (AINS 424)

ENGL 426 English Medieval Literature

ENGL 431a-b Shakespeare

ENGL 444 Milton

*ENGL 449a Verbal Folklore (AINS/ANTH 449a)

ENGL 458a The English Novel

ENGL 465 Victorian Literature

*ENGL 477 American Indian Literature (AINS 477)

FREN 282 The French Novel and Society

FREN 283 Existentialism and the Absurd: The French Foundations

FREN 284 French Theatre in Translation

GER 272 Staging Twentieth Century Germany

GER 275 Creative Minds: The German Classical Heritage

GER 276 Challenges to Traditions

GER 277 Eroticism and Love in the Middle Ages

GER 278 Medieval Answers to Modern Questions

GER 325 History of German Cinema

*GER 373 Women's Fiction in Twentieth Century Germany (W S 373)

GER 375 Love, Madness and Decay in fin-de-Siecle Vienna

*HUM 340 . . . . . . . .The Humanities and Medicine

*HUM 370 Nobel Laureates of Literature

*HUM 420 From Orality to Literature: Storytelling in Contemporary Literature

*HUM 454 Irish Revolutionary Literature

ITAL 350a The Middle Ages: Italian Literature in Translation

ITAL 350b The Renaissance: Italian Literature in Translation

ITAL 350c Italian Theater : Literature in Translation

ITAL 350d The Novel: Italian Literature in Translation

ITAL 450c Italian Cinema and Literature

JPN 310 Japanese Literature and War

PHIL 238 Philosophy in Literature

PRS 450 Contemporary Persian Literature in English Translation

RUSS 250a-b Russian Humanities in Translation

RUSS 330 Russian Literature from the Beginnings to 1850

RUSS 340 Nineteenth Century Russian Literature(in English)

RUSS 350 Twentieth Century Russian Literature (in English)

SPAN 435 Cervantes' Don Quixote

SPAN 445 Novel of the Mexican Revolution

T AR 238 Modern Drama Through Performance

T AR 336 Introduction to Shakespeare through Performance

The Honors Program and General Education

Students should be aware that departments offer honors sections in many of the courses that satisfy general education requirements. Such courses or course sections are always identified by the suffix H when listed in the semester schedule of classes. The following General Education Courses are regularly available for honors credit.

Mathematics

MATH 124 Calculus with Applications

MATH 125 a-b Calculus

English Composition

ENGL 103H

ENGL 104H

ENGL 109H

Second Language

FREN 201 Intermediate French I

FREN 202 Intermediate French II

GER 203 Intensive Intermediate German

RUSS 101a-b Elementary Russian

RUSS 201a-b Intermediate Russian

SPAN 101 First Semester Spanish

SPAN 102 Second Semester Spanish

SPAN 201 Second Year Spanish

SPAN 202 Second Year Spanish

Study Area A - Traditions and Cultures

List 1


ANTH 206 Native Peoples of the Southwest

HIST 272 Japanese Civilization

List 2


FA 207 Western Civilization and the Arts: The Twentieth Century

ENGL 251a-b-c Western Civilization: Literary Perspectives

HIST 102 The History of Western Civilization

HIST 106 History of the United States from 1607 to 1877

HIST 107 History of the United States from 1877 to Present

HIST 369 Mexico Since Independence

HUM 250a-b-c Introduction to Humanities

PHIL 122 Western Civilization: Mind, Matter and God

PHIL 123 Western Civilization: Science and Inquiry

Study Area B - Biological and Physical Sciences

ASTR 101L Essentials of Astronomy Laboratory

CHEM 105a-b Honors Fundamentals of Chemistry

ECOL 182 Introductory Biology II

GEOS 101/103 Introduction to Physical Geology/Introduction to Geosciences Laboratory

GEOS 102/104 Introduction to Historical Geology/Laboratory

PHYS 141 Introductory Mechanics

PHYS 241 Introductory Electricity and Magnetism

PL S 100/101 Plant Science/Laboratory

Study Area C - Individuals, Societies and Institutions

ANTH 101 Introduction to Biological Anthropology and Archaeology

ECON 200 Basic Economic Issues

ECON 371 Economic Development

GEOG 102a Human Geography

GEOS 346 Mineral and Energy Resources

LING 101 Introduction to Language

PHIL 111 Introduction to Philosophy

PHIL 113 Introduction to Moral and Social Philosophy

POL 250 Contemporary International Politics

PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology

Study Area D - Arts and Literature

Art

DNC 370 Human Movement in the Arts

HUM 295q 10Q4 Creativity

M AR 200 Fundamentals of Theory and Aesthetics in Media Arts

M AR 336 History of Japanese Film

MUS 120a-b Musical Skills and Structures I

T AR 100 Acting for General College Students

T AR 238 Modern Drama Through Performance

T AR 336 Introduction to Shakespeare through Performance

Literature

CLAS 342 Homer

B.F.A. and B.M. General Education Requirements

General education requirements vary among the several degree programs in Fine Arts. Bachelor of Arts programs require the general education course work described earlier. Students enrolled in a Bachelor of Fine Arts or Bachelor of Music degree program must satisfy the general education requirements shown below. Students should consult with departmental advisors for additional information.

Individual studies, special topics and courses cross listed from other home departments will be accepted in general education only if approval is granted by the dean prior to enrollment.

In extenuating circumstances, when students feel they need to include a course other than those listed, they should consult their departmental advisor.

Students in all B.F.A. and B.M degree programs are required to complete 45 units outside of the major department, including the general education requirements.

Bachelor of Fine Arts

(MAJORS IN STUDIO ART, DANCE, THEATRE PRODUCTION, MUSICAL THEATRE AND MEDIA ARTS)

Bachelor of Music

(MAJORS IN PERFORMANCE, COMPOSITION AND JAZZ STUDIES)

I. Communication and Conceptualization (12 units)

A. Freshman Composition (6 units)

1. ENGL 100, 101 and 102.

2. ENGL 101 and 102.

3. ENGL 103H and 104H (Honors).

B. Mathematics (3 units)

Three units from MATH 117 and above; or MIS 111.

C. Oral Communication (3 units)
Selected from oral interpretation, beginning acting, Speaking in the Arts and media arts performance
courses. Media arts majors are required to take COMM 100 and 102. Theatre production and acting majors must take T AR 367 for this requirement. Musical theatre majors may substitute T AR 367 or T AR 475 for this requirement.

II. Study Areas (33 total units)

A. Western Civilization (6 units)
Western civilization courses must be selected from outside of the student's major department from the following courses: ARH 117, 118; DNC 259; MUS 107, 108; HUM 355; NES 140; PHIL 111, 113; T AR 140a, 140b;
WS 200; F A 207, 307, 317; HIST 101, 102, 103; HUM 250a, 250b, 250c; ENGL 251a, 251b, 251c; or PHIL 121, 122, 123.

To satisfy group II-A-E requirements, musical theatre majors must include 3-6 units of upper division course work.

B. Science (3 units)
Three units of science (laboratory or nonlaboratory) in the following departments: astronomy, atmospheric sciences, chemistry, ecology and evolutionary biology, entomology, GEOG 103a, 103b (lab 104a, 104b); geosciences, molecular and cellular biology, physics, planetary sciences, SP H 260, 280; RNR 135; WFSC 125, PL S 100.

Media arts majors are required to take 4 units of laboratory science.

C. Individuals, Societies and Institutions (6 units)

Courses to be selected from anthropology, economics, geography and regional development, (except GEOG 103a-103b and 104a-104b), history (except HIST 101, 102, 103), M AR 101, philosophy (except PHIL 111 and 113), political science, psychology, sociology, African American studies, American Indian studies, East Asian studies, Judaic studies, Near Eastern studies (except NES 140), religious studies, women's studies (except WS 200).

D. Non-Western and Minority Studies (3 units)

Students are required to take at least one three-unit course focusing on gender, race, ethnicity or non-western civilization.

E. The Arts (6 units)

From all fine arts offerings in departments other than the student's major, with only one course of applied(studio/performance/production) arts accepted.

To satisfy group II-E requirements, media arts students must include no fewer than three units from ART 101, 102, or 104. Musical theatre majors are required to take MUS 120a and 120b.

F. Department-Specified General Education Course Work Outside of the Major Department (9-15 units)

Musical theatre requirements (16 units)

Some area II-F courses specified by the departments can be used to satisfy requirements in other areas above. However, the student must take the minimum required units in each area.

1. Department of Art Requirements:

Students select from the following courses. Some of the courses are required for a particular study emphasis within the Department of Art, so each student should consult with an advisor in the designated study emphasis.

ANTH 430, DNC 100, 259; EXSS 201; JOUR 301; M AR 101, 200; MKTG 361; MUS 107, 108; PHIL 110, 111, 433; T AR 140a or 140b; WS 253a, 253b.

2. Committee on Dance Requirements:

MUS 107, 108; PHIL 110; T AR 101.

3. Department of Media Arts Requirements:

15 units as outlined below:

a. HIST 101 and 102 or 6-units from HUM 250a,b,c (6)

b. F A 207 or HUM 260 or CCLS 200 (3)

c. Music Theory or Performance (3)

d. Literature (3)

4. School of Music Requirements:

Nine units selected from courses in the College of Arts and Sciences and from any additional courses approved by the General Education Committee for the fulfillment of general education requirements. Vocal performance majors take 16 units of French, German or Italian.

5. Department of Theatre Arts Requirements:

Six units of dramatic literature selected from the following courses: ENGL 267a, 331, 431a, 431b, 432, 446, 475, 485; CLAS 346. Six additional units determined in consultation with the student's study area advisor.

Musical Theatre Requirements (16 units): Nine units of dramatic literature selected from the following courses: ENGL 331, 431a, 431b, 432, 446, 485; CLAS 346; 3 units required of DNC 370; 4 units required of MUS 130a and 130b.

Bachelor of Fine Arts

(MAJORS IN ART EDUCATION AND THEATRE ARTS EDUCATION)

and Bachelor of Music

(MAJOR IN MUSIC EDUCATION)

I. Communication and Conceptualization (12 units)

A. Freshman Composition (6 units)
Completion of one of the following sequences:
1. ENGL 100, 101 and 102.

2. ENGL 101 and 102.

3. ENGL 103H and 104H (Honors).

B. Mathematics (3 units)

MATH 117R/S or above or MIS 111

C. Oral Communication (3 units)

Selected from oral interpretation, beginning acting, Speaking in the Arts, and media arts performance courses. Theatre arts education majors may substitute T AR 367 or T AR 468 for this requirement.

II. Study Areas (33 total units)

A. Western Civilization (6 units)

Western civilization courses must be selected from outside of the student's major department from the following courses: ARH 117, 118; DNC 259; T AR 140a, 140b; WS 200; Fine Arts 207, 307, 317; HIST 101, 102, 103; HUM 250a, 250b, 250c, 355; ENGL 251a, 251b, 251c; NES 140 or PHIL 111, 113, 121, 122, 123.

B. Science (3 units)

Three units of science (laboratory or nonlaboratory) in the following departments: astronomy, atmospheric sci-ences, chemistry, ecology and evolutionary biology, entomology, GEOG 103a, 103b (lab 104a, 104b); geosciences, molecular and cellular biology, physics, planetary sciences, SP H 260, 280; RNR 135; WFSC 125; PL S 100.

C. Individuals, Societies and Institutions (9 units)

Required courses: PSYC 101 and HIST 106 or 107. One additional course selected from anthropology, economics, geography and regional development (except GEOG 103a-103b and 104a-104b), history (except HIST 101, 102, 103), M AR 101, political science, psychology, sociology, African American studies, American Indian studies, East Asian studies, Judaic studies, Near Eastern studies (except NES 140), religious studies, women's studies (except WS 200).

Note: Examination in U.S./Arizona Constitutions or completion of appropriate coursework also is required, although not included in total units required in study areas.

D. Non-Western and Minority Studies (3 units)

Students are required to take at least one three-unit course focusing on gender, race, ethnicity or non-Western civilization.

E. The Arts (3-6 units)

From all fine arts offerings in departments other than the student's major, with only 3 units of applied (studio/performance/production) arts accepted.

Art education majors can apply 6 units of upper division art history to area II-E.

Music education majors can apply 6 units of MUS 330a-330b to area II-E.

F. Department-Specified General Education Course work Outside of the Major Department (15 units)

Fifteen designated units in the College of Education. Please consult an art education, music education or theatre arts education advisor for designated units.

Bachelor of Fine Arts

(MAJOR IN FINE ARTS STUDIES)

I. Communication and Conceptualization (12 units)

A. Freshman Composition (6 units)

Completion of one of the following sequences:

1. ENGL 100, 101 and 102.

2. ENGL 101 and 102.

3. ENGL 103H and 104H (Honors).

B. Mathematics (3 units)

Three units from MATH 117R/S and above or MIS 111.

C. Oral Communication (3 units)

Selected from oral interpretation, beginning acting, speaking in the arts and media arts performance courses.

II. Study Areas (33 units)

A. Literature/Foreign Language/Journalism (12 units)

From two of the following areas:

1. Literature (or survey literature in a foreign language
department).

2. Foreign language (8 units minimum in one language).

3. Journalism.

B. Science (3 units)

Three units of science (laboratory or nonlaboratory) in the following departments: astronomy, atmospheric sciences, chemistry, ecology and evolutionary biology, entomology, GEOG 103a, 103b, (lab 104a, 104b); geosciences, molecular and cellular biology, physics, planetary sciences, SP H 260, 280; RNR 135, WFSC 125, PL S 100.

C. Individuals, Societies and Institutions (6 units)

Courses to be selected from anthropology, economics, geography and regional development (except GEOG 103a-103b and 104a-104b), M AR 101, history (except HIST 101, 102, 103), philosophy (except PHIL 111 and 113), political science, psychology, sociology, African American studies, American Indian studies, East Asian studies, Judaic studies, Near Eastern studies (except NES 140a-140b), religious studies, women's studies (except WS 200).

D. Non-Western and Minority Studies (3 units)

All general fine arts studies students are required to take at least one three-unit course focusing on gender, race, ethnicity or non-western civilization. This course can be part of the general studies major, general education or elective course work and must be approved by the program advisor.

E. ENGL 207, 209, 210, 307, 308 (3 units).

III. Additional Fine Arts Courses

Contact the Dean of Fine Arts Office for current requirements.

POLICIES

Change of Major

Fine Arts majors should consult an advisor in the Office of the Dean of Fine Arts Music Building, Room 113 or the advisor in the specific department.

To change from a major in Humanities, Science or Social and Behavioral Science to another within the same three units, the student must fill out a declaration of major form from Arts and Sciences, Modern Languages Building, Room 347. Approval for the change must be obtained first from the new department by the student before the form is turned in to Arts and Sciences. To declare an Interdisciplinary Studies Major, go to Arts and Sciences for instructions regarding special procedures.

The change of major is effective at the beginning of the next semester.

Course Load

The maximum course load is 19 units of credit per semester. All courses, including those taken for credit, audit, by correspondence or at another academic institution are counted in determining the maximum academic load in Humanities, Science, and Social and Behavioral Science. Students in these units who wish to register for more than 19 hours must have a grade-point average of at least 3.0 and must secure permission from the Assistant Dean of Arts and Sciences. In Fine Arts, correspondence courses are not counted in the 19-unit maximum.

Grade Appeal Procedures

Grade appeals in Fine Arts, Humanities, Science, and Social and Behavioral Sciences are heard in the offices of the respective deans.

Transfer Students - General Information

The Office of Admissions and New Student Enrollment (in the Nugent Building) reviews the official transcript to determine course transfer credits. The evaluator may assign a transfer course to a discipline, or may assign a direct course equivalency for a course from an Arizona community college. Entering transfer students who wish to determine the application of courses to the general education program should see an advisor in Arts and Sciences.

The evaluation of transfer course work in the major and minor disciplines is done by the major advisor. Except for students in Fine Arts, all students must declare a major area of study at the 55-unit level. Students who transfer 55 units or more may remain as undeclared for one semester following admission.

For non-Fine Arts students, a copy of the transcript from the Office of Admissions is required for evaluations. Advisors will not evaluate the application of courses to the degree program without a university transcript evaluation. In Fine Arts, advisors use the computerized evaluation. However, students must have previously submitted their transfer transcripts to the Office of Admissions.

Students are urged to participate in the academic orientations offered by the college during the summer and at the beginning of each semester. Special sessions offer the transfer student an evaluation of the transcript, explanation of the requirements and meaning of the General Education Program, materials that cover the degree options, a list of faculty advisors and specific information about the special and preprofessional programs.

Transfer Students from Arizona Community Colleges

The University of Arizona has prepared transfer guides that will help community college students select courses to satisfy the General Education requirements. These transfer guides are available at every community college in the student advising offices. Students should work closely with the community college advisors in planning their curriculum, in order to make the smoothest possible transition to the University.

In addition, the Arizona community colleges and the Arizona universities have entered into an agreement regarding the application of transfer units toward General Education. This agreement is called the Transfer General Education Core Curriculum (TGECC).

To complete a degree program efficiently, students should select courses to meet the Transfer General Education Core Curriculum requirements that will also fulfill program requirements in the college and major they intend to pursue upon transfer (see "Transfer General Education Core Curriculum [TGECC]") under Admission and Registration section). Community college students transferring to The University of Arizona from an Arizona community college will satisfy the general education requirements in Arts and Sciences upon completion of the following college requirements.

I. Arts and Sciences strongly recommends, for all transfer students with a B.A. or B. S. degree objective, that 6 units of the Arts and Humanities subject area in the transfer core be devoted to a Western civilization sequence.

II. Arts and Sciences will require of all transfer students with a B.A. or B.S. degree objective, as part of the college portion of the general education requirements:- proficiency in a second language at the fourth semester level;- a course in non-Western civilization;
- a course in literature.The requirement for a course in non-Western civilization can be met within the transfer core curriculum as the required three units of coursework emphasizing global/international awareness or historical awareness. Should this requirement in the transfer core curriculum not be met with a non-Western course, the student will be required to take an upper-division course in non-Western civilization at The University of Arizona (See List 1, Study Area A for the possibilities). The requirement for a course in literature can be met within the transfer core curriculum as one of the six units of options. Should the student not choose a literature course as an option, the student will be required to take an upper division course in literature at The University of Arizona. (See the Literature list, Study Area D for the possibilities.)