COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

Introduction

The College of Agriculture provides professional education for a wide range of career opportunities in agriculture, natural resources, and in family and consumer resources. The various curricula offer professional preparation for careers in agri-business, government, public service agencies, retail and service industries, human health institutions, the food service and processing industry, financial institutions, youth development agencies, conservation and environmental organizations, farming and ranching, research, extension, communications and education. A broad education in a professional knowledge area is combined with foundation courses in the natural and social sciences, communications and the humanities to develop a well-rounded academic experience.

College responsibilities include instruction, research and ex- tension. The academic units of the college include ten departments and two schools. The departments are Agricultural and Resource Economics, Agricultural Education, Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, Animal Sciences, Entomology, Nutrition and Food Science, Plant Pathology, Plant Sciences, Soil and Water Science, and Veterinary Science. The School of Renewable Natural Resources is organized into four programs: Watershed Resources, Landscape Resources, Range Resources, and Wildlife and Fisheries Resources. The School of Family and Consumer Resources is organized into the divisions of Family Studies and Retailing and Consumer Studies. The college administers the undergraduate program in microbiology under the curriculum guidance of a multi-disciplinary faculty committee. The college also participates in the management of the University departments of Biochemistry, and Molecular and Cellular Biology where several college faculty hold joint appointments.

DEGREES

The college offers the Bachelor of Science in Agriculture, the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture, the Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science, the Bachelor of Science in Family and Consumer Resources, and the Bachelor of Science in Renewable Natural Resources. Bachelor of Science degree programs in biochemistry, microbiology, and molecular and cellular biology are also offered through Arts and Sciences (see Arts and Sciences section of this catalog). Each student is assigned a faculty advisor who provides undergraduate guidance and counseling.

The College of Agriculture provides an undergraduate option in Agricultural Operations and Systems Management in Yuma. This program is jointly offered through The University of Arizona, Northern Arizona University, and Arizona Western College. Contact the Office of Academic Programs, College of Agriculture, for information.

The College of Agriculture offers graduate studies leading to both the Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees with majors in a large number of disciplines. In addition, a Master of Agricultural Education, a Master of Home Economics Education, and a Master of Landscape Architecture are available.

University Credit may be earned in certain graduate courses at The University of Arizona facilities away from Tucson.

UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS

Agricultural and Resource Economics Microbiology
Agricultural Education Nutritional Sciences
Agricultural Technology Management Plant Sciences
Animal Sciences Range Management
Biochemistry Retailing & Consumer
Environmental Sciences Studies
Family and Consumer Resources Soil & Water Science
Family Studies Veterinary Science
Home Economics Education Watershed Management
Landscape Architecture* Wildlife & Fisheries Science
* See School of Renewable Natural Resources in this section

UNDERGRADUATE MINORS

Minor programs of study are available for interested undergraduates. Completion of a minor is not required for graduation in the College of Agriculture. A minimum of 20 units of course work must be completed with a grade point average of 2.00 or better to successfully complete a minor. A minimum of 12 units must be upper-division course work. Twelve units of course work must be University Credit.

The list of approved minors in the College of Agriculture are:

Agricultural and Resource Nutritional Sciences

Economics Plant Sciences

Animal Sciences Range Management

Entomology Soil & Water Science

Family Studies Watershed Management

Microbiology Wildlife & Fisheries Science

Students interested in minors in the humanities, social and behavioral science or the sciences need to consult the section on minors in Arts and Sciences.

Students interested in minors in business and public administration may select a structured minor in general business administration, finance, marketing, human resources management, or public management. MATH 117R/S and ECON 200 are prerequisites to these minors. Students following the course requirements for these minors must meet the Advanced Standing Policy of the BPA college to enroll in upper-division courses. Student advising on business minors is available in the Student Advising and Assistance Center, Office of Instruc-tion, College of Agriculture, Forbes Building, or the Student Advising Office, School of Family and Consumer Resources.

Course requirements for business and public administration minors are

GENERAL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION-ACCT 200, 210; MIS 111; 12 units from the following: STAT 275; MAP 305, 320; ECON 300, 330; FIN 311; MKTG 361.

FINANCE-ACCT 200, 210; FIN 311; ECON 330; 9 units from the following: FIN 412, 421, 431; ECON 442.

MARKETING-ACCT 200; MKTG 361; 15 units from the following: MKTG 370, 450, 454, 455, 456, 458, 470.

HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT-ACCT 200; STAT 275; MAP 330; 12 units from the following: MAP 305, 430, 432, 480; SOC 326; PSYC 385; COMM 412.

PUBLIC MANAGEMENT-ACCT 200, 272; STAT 275; MAP 305; 9 units from the following: MAP 330, 432, 480; PA 405, 410.

Consult the appropriate school or department listings in this catalog for additional information about minors.

SPECIAL UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

Agricultural Business Emphasis

The agricultural business emphasis allows students to integrate Agricultural and Resource Economics and business courses in their plans of study. Successful completion of the study plan requires 20 units of course work in Agricultural and Resource Economics and business, with 12 units from the upper division. For details, consult the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

Agricultural Technology Management

This study area is designed to prepare students to become skilled in the many aspects of agricultural technology, environmental protection, communication, business and economics. Graduates will be prepared for positions in small to large-scale operations where 1) an understanding of environmental complexities, 2) an ability to communicate, and 3) technical competence are important. Employment opportunities include: production/management/sales positions, certified plant/animal protection specialists, and many agricultural service-oriented positions. For details, consult the Department of Agricultural Education.

Biochemistry

The College of Agriculture offers a major in biochemistry in conjunction with the Department of Biochemistry. This program provides undergraduates the fundamentals to study the molecular principles in the agricultural sciences, biology, and the environmental sciences. The major provides an excellent scientific background for graduate study in biochemistry, plant science, animal science, veterinary science, pathobiology, plant pathology, entomology, soil and water science, and the environmental sciences. For further details, consult the Department of Biochemistry.

Environmental Science

The major in environmental sciences is available in the Department of Soil and Water Science. It provides students with the opportunity to integrate courses in biology, chemistry, physics, and agriculture with a set of courses involved in the study of environmental quality of our land and water resources. For details, consult the Department of Soil and Water Science.

Microbiology

The undergraduate program in microbiology is administered by the College of Agriculture under the guidance of a faculty advisory committee representing the fields of plant pathology, soil and water science, plant sciences, molecular and cellular biology, veterinary science, and civil engineering. Students may select a plan of study that leads to a Bachelor of Science in Agriculture degree (College of Agriculture) or a Bachelor of Science degree (Science, Arts and Sciences). The microbiology program offers undergraduates a core curriculum complemented by specialty areas such as the applied sciences in agriculture, biotechnology, allied health, and medicine. For further details, consult Microbiology: Undergraduate Program in the Department of Veterinary Science.

Race Track Industries Option

Students may select the race track industries option under the major in animal sciences. The option requires the completion of specialized courses in race track industries, in conjunction with business courses. For details, consult the Department of Animal Sciences.

GENERAL CURRICULUM

All undergraduate students in the College of Agriculture are required to complete a common general education program of study for a Bachelor of Science in Agriculture, a Bachelor of Sci-ence in Family and Consumer Resources, a Bachelor of Science in Renewable Natural Resources, or a Bachelor of Landscape Architecture.

The purpose of the general education curriculum is to establish an educational foundation that will assist students in their development as productive and effective citizens and prepare them to engage in independent and critical thought using creative and analytical skills. The general education program is also designed to develop in students an appreciation for and understanding of world cultures, societal and institutional standards and interrelationships, cultural heritage, institutional and humanistic values, the natural sciences, and the arts and humanities.

The bachelor of science degrees require the completion of a minimum of 130 units including all course requirements detailed in the general education curriculum and the program of study in the major. A minimum of 42 units of upper-division course work must be completed by a student with the satisfactory completion of a writing-emphasis course in the major. All undergraduates must complete the Writing-Proficiency Examination administered by the University Composition Board and earn a grade-point average of at least a 2.000 on all work undertaken in the major field of study.

Students are strongly encouraged to have their own microcomputer. To be compatible with College of Agriculture Computer laboratories, students should have a Windows-based, 486 or higher speed processor, with wordprocessing, spreadsheet and communications software.

General Education Program

I. Basic Skills and Proficiencies

Each student must complete the course requirements identified in the following subject areas. A minimum total of 18 units of course work must be completed to fulfill the group requirements in basic skills and proficiencies.

A.First-Year Composition

All students must enroll in one of the following four sequences:

1. English 100, 101 and 102

2. English 101 and 102

3. English 103H and 104H (Honors)

4. English 106, 107 and 108 (Foreign students)

B. Communications

Students must complete a minimum of 6 units of course work from an approved list of courses published in the College of Agriculture Curriculum Guidesheet.

C. Mathematics

College Algebra (MATH 117R/S) or any 3-unit mathematics course numbered above 117R/S is required.

D.Computer Skills

Students must complete a minimum of 3 units of course work from an approved list of courses published in the College of Agriculture Curriculum Guidesheet.

II. Study Areas

The study areas are designed to introduce students to subject matter from a variety of academic disciplines in Arts and Sciences and Agriculture. Students are required to select course work in a minimum of five study areas from the following groups: (A) Western Civilization; (B) Biological and Life Sciences; (C) Physical and Environmental Sciences; (D) Individuals, Societies, and Institutions; (E) Non-Western Civilization; and (F) Arts, Literature and Language. These course requirements may be fulfilled during any semester Gof the undergraduate years. Students need to consult with their school and department academic advisors for specific course sequences to fulfill requirements in each study area.

A.Western Civilization (6 units)

Under this study area, students examine Western civilization as a collective heritage of ideas, values, literacy and artistic expressions and political, social, economic and scientific changes.

B.Biological and Life Sciences (7 units)

Courses presented in this study area introduce students to the language and practices of the science of life systems. Students examine the methods used to post and test hypotheses and the logic involved in developing theories through the scientific method.

C.Physical and Environmental Sciences (8 units)

Under this study area, students investigate the dimensions of sciences concerned with the physical laws of nature and the ecological systems of our global habitat. The methods used in scientific thought and quantitative methods of analysis are presented to students.

D.Individuals, Societies and Institutions (6 units)

Courses in this area systematically examine individual and collective behavior, and explore the basic concepts and theories used in analysis of personal, social, cultural, political, economic, philosophical, religious and scientific issues.

E.Non-Western Civilization - other cultures (3 units)

Students are introduced to the values, traditions and development of non-Western and ethnic cultures.

F.Arts, Literature and Language (6 units)

The purpose of this study area is to provide opportunities for students to explore the processes of creativity in the arts and recognize the communicative and cultural values of art, literature and languages.

General Requirements Bachelor of Science in Agriculture


  GROUP                                                UNITS

  I. Basic Skills and Proficiencies

      First-Year Composition                            6-9
      Communication1                                    6
      Mathematics                                       3
      Computer Skills1                                  3
      Upper-Division Writing-Proficiency Examination2   18-21

II. Study Areas3

     A. Western Civilization1                           6
     B. Biological and Life Sciences1,4                 7
     C. Physical and Environmental Sciences1            8
     D. Individuals, Societies and Institutions1        6
     E. Non-Western Civilization1                       3
     F. Arts, Literature and Language1                  6
                                              (Minimum) 28
III. Major5                                             16-53

IV. Electives and/or Minor                              21-64

1Approved courses listed on the Curriculum Guidesheet and on course listing. Consult an academic advisor for specific course requirements.

2Students earning an "unsatisfactory" result on the exam will be required to complete additional writing course work.

3Students are required to complete a minimum of five study areas.

4Students are required to complete one course that includes lab work.

5Students are required to complete a writing-emphasis course in the major.

GENERAL INFORMATION

The College of Agriculture participates in several international programs. Activities include projects in Cape Verde, Brazil, Morocco, Mexico, Senegal, Lesotho, Mauritania, and Egypt. Interaction with Peace Corps, the Agency for International Development, and the U.S. State Department through the Office of International Programs provides unique opportunities for student and faculty evaluation of world resource problems.

The college includes the following resource facilities: Agricultural Sciences Communications, Agricultural Statistics, Remote Sensing, Computer Applications, Advanced Resource Technology, and the Office of Arid Lands Studies.

FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND AWARDS-The college awards numerous scholarships and fellowships to undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in programs of study in agriculture, natural resources, and family and consumer resources.

OUTSTANDING SENIOR AWARDS-Each year the faculty selects an outstanding senior in each department and school.

DEAN'S LIST-This honor is reserved for students who carry no fewer than 15 units of work in a semester and attain a grade-point average of 3.5000 or better.

SCHOLASTIC SOCIETIES-The college recognizes the scholarship societies of Alpha Tau Alpha, Alpha Zeta, Gamma Sigma Delta, and Kappa Omicron Nu.

HONORS PROGRAM-The college participates in the University-wide Honors Program.

INTERNSHIP-The College of Agriculture provides internship opportunities to qualified students who wish to receive training and practice in actual service with technical, business, or government establishments.

PEACE CORPS-The Peace Corps office at The University of Arizona is a function of the Office of International Agriculture Programs in the College of Agriculture. The Peace Corps Office provides international volunteer placement counseling and processes Peace Corps and United Nations Volunteer Program applications from University students and staff.

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION-The college participates in the University Cooperative Education Program.

SCHOOL OF FAMILY AND CONSUMER RESOURCES

The School of Family and Consumer Resources offers the Bachelor of Science degree in Family and Consumer Resources with majors in family studies (emphasizing human development, interpersonal relations, or family life education), retailing and consumer studies, home economics education, and family and consumer resources.

The Family Studies Division is concerned with personal and group values that are desirable outcomes of successful family life through the use of personal, family and social resources for the attainment of these values. It deals with social, economic, aesthetic, technological, managerial, health, and ethical aspects of family relations, and human development.

The Retailing and Consumer Studies Division is committed to excellence in education by preparing students to serve consumers in a culturally diverse society through careers in a global retailing industry. Our students are actively recruited by successful retail firms across the nation.

The undergraduate program has as its major objectives: (1) general education for personal and family living, (2) specialization in various aspects of family and consumer resources in preparation for professional positions, and (3) courses to enrich the professional preparation of students in other colleges.

Students enrolled in majors in the School of Family and Consumer Resources may elect to choose a minor subject area with the approval of the student's advisor. For information on minors in the College of Business and Public Administration, see "Undergraduate Minors" elsewhere in the College of Agriculture section.

Requirements for the various curricula appear within the division offering the major (see Departments and Courses of Instruction section of this catalog). The course requirements listed with each curriculum are patterned from the outline below for the Bachelor of Science in Family and Consumer Resources degree.

General Requirements Bachelor of Science in Family and Consumer Resources


   GROUP                                              UNITS

  I. Basic Skills and Proficiencies1
         First-Year Composition                        6-9
         Communications                                6
         Mathematics                                   3
         Computer skills                               3
         Upper-Division Writing Proficiency Exam2

  II. Study Areas (Complete five study areas.)1

       A. Western Civilization                         6-9
       B. Biological and Life Sciences (incl. lab)     8
       C. Physical and Environmental Sciences          8
       D. Individuals, Societies and Institutions      6-9
       E. Non-Western Civilization                     3
       F. Arts, Literature and Language                6

III. Foundation, Major and Minor                       50-80

IV. Electives                                          0-30

 Total Units Required for Graduation                   130

1Groups I and II comprise the general education requirement for the College of Agriculture. Students must complete a minimum of 18 units in Group I and 32 units in Group II from a college-approved list.

2Students awarded an unsatisfactory mark must complete an additional writing course from a college-approved list.

Family and Consumer Resources Organizations

FAMILY AND CONSUMER RESOURCES STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS ARE THE U A RETAILING ASSOCIATION, THE SOUTHWEST RETAIL CENTER STUDENT ADVISORY BOARD, FUTURE FOCUS AND KAPPA OMICRON NU.

SCHOOL OF RENEWABLE NATURAL RESOURCES

The principal goals of the school are (1) to provide students with educational opportunities that will enable them to assume positions of responsibility and leadership in management, planning, design and study of renewable natural resources; and (2) to provide a foundation of basic general education that will enable graduates, regardless of their professional pursuits, to function as responsible citizens in their communities.

The school is organized into four programs: Watershed Resources; Landscape Resources; Rangeland and Forest Resources; and Wildlife and Fisheries Resources.

The school offers the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Renewable Natural Resources with majors in watershed management, range management, and wildlife and fisheries science and the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture with a major in landscape architecture. The landscape architecture major is being phased out and is not available to new students. Minors are available in watershed management, range management, and wildlife and fisheries science.

Specific requirements for the various curricula appear with the majors listed under Renewable Natural Resources (see Departments and Courses of Instruction section). A student transferring into a baccalaureate degree program in Renewable Natural Resources shall meet all degree requirements listed for the major. Transfer credits may be applied or rejected at the discretion of the program faculty.

General Requirements Bachelor of Science in Renewable Natural Resources
and Bachelor of Landscape Architecture


  GROUP                                 UNITS         UNITS
                                         B.S.

                                        in R.N.R.     B.L.A.

 I. Basic Skills and Proficiencies1

      First-Year Composition.            6-9           6-9
      COMM 100, 102                      3             3
      COMM Elec. (oral or writ. Engl.)   3             3
      Mathematics or Statistics2         3             3
      Computer Science Elective3         3             3
      Upper-division writing-proficiency
      examination4

II. Study Areas

    (Complete five of six areas.)5

       Western Civilization              6             6
       Biological and Life Sciences
       (incl. lab)                       8             8
       Physical and Environmental
        Sciences                         8             8
       Individuals, Societies and
        Institutions                     6             6
       Non-Western Civilization          3             3
       Arts, Literature and Language     6             6

III. Major and College

   Major and RNR subjects                42            55

   SW 200, 201                           4             4

IV. Elective . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .0-34          0-46

Total Required for Graduation. . .. . . .130           155

1 Groups I and II comprise the general education requirement for the College of Agriculture. Students must complete a minimum of 18 units in Group I and 32 units in Group II from a college-approved list.

2 The mathematics or statistics requirement may be fulfilled by STAT 160, 163, 263, 275, or by any mathematics department course except 116, 202, or 405. MATH 116, 202, or 405 may be listed in Group IV.

3 The computer science requirement may be fulfilled by an approved course or by demonstrated skill in the use of computers.

4 Students awarded an unsatisfactory mark must complete an additional writing course from a college-approved list.

5 Students in RNR must complete a minimum of 8 units of chemistry, 4 units of ecology or molecular and cellular biology, ECON 201a, and 6 units of biological or physical science as part of the Study Areas. B.L.A. students must complete a minimum of 4 units of chemistry, 3 units of ecology or molecular and cellular biology, ECON 201a, 3 units of biological or physical science, and 2 additional units of mathematics as part of the Study Areas.

Honors Information

The school encourages outstanding students to participate in the University-wide Honors Program.

Student Organizations

Students in the school are encouraged to actively participate in their respective student chapters of national organizations and to attend and participate in national and local meetings of the professional societies whenever possible.

Active student chapters of the Society for Range Management, the Wildlife Society, the American Fisheries Society, and the American Society of Landscape Architects are available to students in the school. The Natural Resource Student Association is an organization open to graduate and undergraduate students with an interest in natural resources. This group is active in many activities associated with the school's programs.