The University of Arizona  1993-95 General Catalog

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Theatre Arts (T AR)
University Fine Arts Complex
Drama Building
Room 239
(520) 621-7008

Professors Albert D. Tucci, Head, Robert C. Burroughs (Emeritus),
Irene F. Comer (Emerita), Harold W. Dixon, Robert A. Keyworth
(Emeritus), Frank K. La Ban, Sam Smiley

Associate Professors Richard T. Hanson, Peggy Kellner, William A.
Lang, Mary Z. Maher, Jeffrey L. Warburton, Dianne J. Winslow

Assistant Professors Jerry R. Dickey, Karen K. Husted, Julie A.
Mack, Charles D. O'Connor, Daniel Yurgaitis

The Department of Theatre Arts offers the following degrees:
Bachelor of Arts in Theater Arts; Bachelor of Fine Arts with a
major in theatre production with options available in acting and
design/technical production; Bachelor of Fine Arts with a major
in musical theatre; Bachelor of Fine Arts with a major in theatre
arts education; and Master of Arts and Master of Fine Arts with a
major in theatre arts. For graduate admissions and degree
requirements, consult the Graduate Catalog.

The Department of Theatre Arts is committed to providing
professional training at the undergraduate and graduate levels in
the theatre arts through a program of performance-centered
activities and creative studies, the object of which is to insure
that each student acquires a thorough understanding and
appreciation of the theatre arts through classroom study, studio-
laboratory training, and university theatre production. The
programs of study are designed for those who intend to pursue a
professional theatre career, as well as those who may enter other
fields where theatre skills are desirable. The programs are
designed to instill in the student the highest academic standards
and professional skills required to initiate a career in
educational or professional theatre.

Theatre arts core curriculum: All entering freshmen except
musical theatre majors (see musical theatre degree requirements)
will be admitted to the Bachelor of Arts degree program and must
take the following core program in their first year. T AR 101,
111, 113, 115, 116a or 116b, 118, 145, 149, 151 in addition to
twelve (12) units (minimum of 6 units per semester) in general
education requirements as prescribed in current Booklink.

Students wishing to major in a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree must
complete an audition, interview and/or portfolio review to be
admitted to the following Bachelor of Fine Arts programs: major
in theatre production, professional actor training option or
design/technical production option; major in musical theatre; and
major in theatre arts education. These degrees each require 45
general education units as described under the Bachelor of Fine
Arts in the Faculty of Fine Arts section of this catalog.

The requirements for the various programs are listed below. 

Bachelor of Arts in Theatre Arts

The Bachelor of Arts in Theatre Arts is designed for the theatre
generalist with emphasis on liberal arts and provides an
appropriate base for advanced study of theatre at the graduate
level. In addition to the general education units required, as
described under the Bachelor of Arts in the Faculty of Fine Arts
section of this catalog, students must take 39 units in the major
and the following requirements must be met: T AR 101, 111, 113,
115, 116a or 116b, 118, 145, 149, 151, 340a-340b, 440, 455 or
460a, 1 unit selected from 497a-f, and 6 units of dramatic
literature. A 20-unit minor is also required in a related field.
(See the Faculty of Fine Arts section for details.) If the minor
is selected in theatre, it must be from one of the following two
minors in theatre arts: performance studies (courses to be
selected from T AR 207, 238, 239, 336, 367, 430, 431, 432, 456,
460a, 460b, 468, 497a-f) or production studies (courses required
are T AR 120, 220, 222, 223, 225, 2 units of 497a-f, 8-12 units
to be selected from T AR 215, 401, 420, 421, 422, 424, 429, 497a-
e). If the minor is in a field other than the fine arts, it is
recommended that additional general electives be taken in fine
arts. At least 18 units in the major must be University credit.
Minimum total units required for a degree with this major: 125.

Bachelor of Fine Arts

MAJOR IN THEATRE PRODUCTION: The Bachelor of Fine Arts with a
major in theatre production is an extensive professional training
program for highly talented and motivated theatre students.
Admission to the major is granted only if the student has
demonstrated strong potential for a professional career in the
theatre. The faculty in the student's area of specialization will
evaluate each student's professional potential, trainability, and
talent after an audition, interview, and/or portfolio review.
Options are as follows:

Professional actor training program: Admission is by interview
and audition at the completion of the theatre arts core
curriculum at the end of the freshman year. 72 units must be
taken in the major and the following requirements must also be
met: T AR 203, 204, 250, 251, 305, 306, 340a, 340b, 430, 440,
449, 451, 452, 455, 475, 4 semesters of 497f (8 units minimum); 6
units of dramatic literature; 6 units selected from courses in
dance, fencing, and stage combat; at least two units from MUS 103
or 111 or 205 or MUS 180v. At least 18 units in the major must be
University credit. Minimum total units required for a degree with
this option: 125.

Design/technical production option: Admission is by portfolio
review and interview at the completion of the theatre arts core
curriculum. 80 units must be taken in the major and the following
requirements must be met: T AR 340a, 340b, 401 or 422, 415, 416,
420, 419 or 421, 423 or 439, 424, 427, 429, 440, 455, 4-8 units
selected from 497a, 497b, 497c, 497d, or 497e, and 6 units of
dramatic literature. At least 18 units in the major must be
University credit. Minimum total units required for a degree with
this option: 125.

MAJOR IN MUSICAL THEATRE: The musical theatre major is an
intensive professional training program for those students
interested in a career in musical theatre. The course of study,
offered in cooperation with the School of Music and Committee on
Dance, emphasizes the collaborative process of musical theatre
and provides an intensive course of study in music, dance, and
theatre arts. Admission to the upper division is granted only if
the student has demonstrated strong potential for a professional
career in musical theatre. Preliminary admission to the program
is by audition at the beginning of the freshman year. Admission
to advanced musical theatre course work is by interview and
audition at the completion of the theater arts core curriculum at
the end of the sophomore year. At that time, the faculty will
evaluate each student's professional potential, trainability, and
talent. Required course work: Lower-division theatre arts
courses: T AR 111, 113, 115, 116a or 116b, 118, 140a or 140b,
149, 151, 203, 204, 205, 250, 251. For musical theatre majors,
concurrent registration is not required in 145, 111 and 113, or
116 and 118 with either 149 or 151. Music courses: 110a, 110b,
120a, 120b, 130a, 130b, 8 semesters of voice (to include 4 units
of 285v, minimum level of proficiency), and 8 units of MUS
200/400 ensembles, (up to 8 units of 497f may be substituted with
the approval of the area head). Dance courses: 112a or 112b,
112c, 143, 152a, 175, 176a, 241a or 241b, 244a, 244b, 244c, or
244d. Upper-division theatre arts course work: T AR 305, 306,
340, 403, 404, 449, 451, 452, 497f (4 units). It is required that
students take 28 units in music; 13 units in dance and 52 units
in theatre. Of these, 16 units must also satisfy general
education requirements. Minimum total units for a degree with
this major: 129.

MAJOR IN THEATRE ARTS EDUCATION: Students may be admitted upon
completion of theatre arts core curriculum and an interview. This
major is designed for students planning to teach in the
elementary, middle or high schools. Graduates qualify for the K-
12 Theatre Arts Specialist Endorsement on a Secondary Certificate
from the State of Arizona. This program approximates
certification requirements in most states. The prerequisites for
entry into this program include the following: completion of the
theatre arts core curriculum, an interview, acceptance both by
the Department of Theatre Arts and the College of Education, and
passing scores on a College of Education designated admission
test. 46 units are required in the major and the student must
complete the following theatre arts courses: T AR 340a or 340b,
410, 440, 455, and 456; and at least 6 units selected from 203,
204, 238, 239, 267, 336, or 468, and the following education
courses: ED P 310, TTE 300, 338t, 396, 493B, EDUC 350, LRC 435,
493; SER 301b. A teaching minor is not required, but those
students anticipating employment in areas where a teaching minor
might be advantageous should consult with their advisor. At least
18 units in the major must be University credit. Minimum total
units required for the degree with this major: 125.

NOTE: All Bachelor of Fine Arts students are required to take at
least one 3-unit course focusing on gender, race, ethnicity, or
non-western civilization. 

Minors

Theatre arts minor/teaching minor (20 units): Teaching minors
must take T AR 410 and 338t. Minors may select classes from the
following (6 units minimum): T AR 100, 103, 336, 338t, 410, 431,
432, 460a, 460b; (Theatre arts minors may not take T AR 149 and
151 to satisfy this requirement.) Production classes (6 units
minimum) choose from T AR 111, 113, 115, 116a, 116b, 118, 120,
220, 222, 223, 225. Theatre arts minors must take theatre history
classes 140a and 140b.

100. Acting for General College Students (3) I II S The craft of
acting with emphasis on body, voice and mind. Theoretical
background and practical experience, including in-class
performances of selected scenes. Open to non-majors only.

101. Introduction to Theatre (3) I Investigation of the nature of
theatre as a performance event through theoretical readings,
resource materials, attendance at live theatre performances and
lecture/discussion. Open to majors only.

103. Theatre Appreciation (3) I II An introduction to the art
used in producing the play: directing, acting, technical
production. Open to non-majors only.

111. Stagecraft (3) I II Basic principles of the scenic process:
construction and use of materials, shop techniques and practices.
2R, 1L.

113. Stagecraft Crew (1) [Rpt./2] I II S Crew work on building
theatrical sets or properties for department productions. P, CR,
111 for majors.

115. Makeup (1) I II History and essentials of makeup; straight,
character, and special types; effects of light on makeup;
opportunity for experience in production. 2S.

116a-116b. Stage Costume History (3-3) I II Trends of historic
dress analyzed in relation to social and economic background;
design and execution of costumes, and the organization and care
of departmental wardrobes. 116a is not prerequisite to 116b. 2R,
3L.

118. Stage Costume Crew (1) [Rpt./2 units] I II S Crew work
involved with costume construction, wardrobe maintenance and
storage. P, CR, 116 for majors.

120. Basic Theatre Graphics (2) I II Practical graphic skills
essential to theatrical productions. 4S.

140a-140b. History of the Theatre and Drama in Western
Civilization (3-3) Origins and development of the arts of theatre
from primitive ritual to modern times; integrated study of plays,
theatre architecture, dramatic styles, and theories of
significant periods. 140a is not prerequisite to 140b. Open to
non-majors.

145. Principles of Dramatic Structure (3) I Interpretation of
structural elements of major dramatic forms and styles in
relation to stage presentation and film; reading and analysis of
representative plays. P, 101. For majors only.

149. Acting I (3) I Fundamental techniques of acting, with
emphasis on the actor's approach to characterization and the
performer's relationship to all parts of the play's production.
2R, 2S. Concurrent registration required in 111 and 113, or 116a-
116b and 118. Open to theatre arts majors only. 

151. Acting II (3) II Intensive study of text analysis and the
actor's approach to characterization as it pertains to modern
realism. 2R, 2S. Concurrent registration required in 145, 111 and
113, or 116a-116b and 118. P, 149.

194. Practicum
a. Performance (1-2) [Rpt./4 units] I II S

203. Voice and Movement for the Actor I (2) [Rpt./1] I Beginning
voice and movement skills for the actor including the Linklater
approach, phonetics, physical isolation and awareness exercises.
4S. Open to acting majors only. P, 151, audition.

204. Voice and Movement for the Actor II (2) [Rpt./1] II
Continued voice and movement skills for the actor. 4S. Open to
acting majors only. P, 203, 250, audition.

205. Musical Theatre (2) [Rpt./1] I S American musical theatre:
its origins, development and influences. Practical applications.
1R, 2S. Open to majors only.

215. Sound for the Theatre (2) I II Basic technical and aesthetic
principles of theatrical sound production. 2R, 2S.

220. Stage Lighting (3) Studies in stage lighting equipment,
procedures, design techniques, and shop practices. 2R, 1L. P,
120.

222. Stage Lighting Crew (1) [Rpt./2] I II S Crew work on
theatrical stage lighting productions. P, CR, 220 for majors.

223. Scene Design (3) I II Basic principles of scenic design,
painting techniques and shop practices. 2R, 1L.

225. Scene Design Crew (1) [Rpt./2 units] I II S Crew work
involved with painting and decorating sets for department
productions. P, CR 223 for majors.

238. Modern Drama Through Performance (3) II Interpretation of
modern plays from Ibsen to the present; presentation of speakers
in drama, with emphasis on the physical and vocal qualities that
project these characters; deals with the modern masters, such as
Shaw, Miller, and Williams.

239. Speaking in the Arts (3) I II A studio course for presenters
in the fine arts who wish to develop skills in appearing on the
electronic media, stressing background, current trends, and
performance techniques. (Identical with M AR 239)

250. Acting III (3) I Intensive work in expanding the versatility
of the actor's instrument. Improvisation, class exercises and
scene work. 2R, 2S. P, 151, audition. CR, 203.

251. Acting IV (3) II Nonrealistic styles, including
expressionism, absurdism and the contemporary avant-garde; work
with select exercises in both representational and presentational
modes. Analytical skills, scene performance and critique. 2R, 2S.
P, 203, 250, audition. CR, 204.

305. Voice and Movement for the Actor III (2) [Rpt./1] I
Intermediate voice and movement skills for the actor including
standard stage speech and period manners and movement; emphasis
on Shakespearean style. 4S. Open to majors only. P, 204, 251,
audition.

306. Voice and Movement for the Actor IV (2) [Rpt./1] II
Continued intermediate voice and movement skills for the actor
including individualized attention to special voice problems and
period manners and movement. Emphasis on Commedia dell'arte,
Moliere and English Restoration styles. 4S. Open to majors only.
P, 305.

329. Art History of the Cinema (3) I (Identical with CLAS 329)

336. Introduction to Shakespeare through Performance (3) I
Understanding Shakespeare's plays through performance.
Performance-oriented analysis compels a thorough comprehension of
the ideas, emotions, attitudes, and intent of the plays being
studied.

338t. Teaching of Theatre Arts (3) II Carries credit in education
only. (Identical with TTE 338t)

340a-340b. History of the Theatre (3-3) I II Origins and
development of the arts of theatre from primitive ritual to
modern times; integrated study of plays, theatre architecture,
dramatic styles, and theories of significant periods. For majors
only. 340a and 340b are Writing-Emphasis Courses. P, 145 and
satisfaction of the upper-division writing-proficiency
requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis Courses" in the Academic
Policies and Graduation Requirements section of this catalog).

367. English Phonetics (3) I Scientific study of the sounds of
speech; emphasis on laws and principles determining articulatory
features, dialect variation, sound change, and sound as
communication context.

396H. Honors Proseminar (3) II

397. Workshop
a. Writing and the Arts (3) I II P, ENGL 101, 102.

401. Advanced Stagecraft I (3) I Advanced studies in scenic
construction methods and techniques. P, 111. May be convened with
501.

402. Combat for the Stage (1) [Rpt./1) I II Basic study in the
execution of staged combat, training in the use of theatrical
weapons and hand-to-hand combat required in playscripts.
Extensive physical training as well as work in relaxation and
focus. Open to majors only. May be convened with 502.

403. Musical Theatre II (3) I Intensive text and score analysis
in relation to the process of characterization for the actor,
singer, dancer in musical theatre. Individual and group
performance. Audition materials and techniques for a professional
career in theatre. Open to majors only. 2L, 2S. P, 205 and
audition.

404. Musical Theatre III (3) II Intensive scene study and
exploration of the major historical styles and genres of the
American musical theatre. 2R, 2S. Open to majors only. P, 403 and
audition. May be convened with 504.

410. Methods of Teaching Creative Drama (3) I Principles and
procedures of improvisation, role-playing, creative playwriting
techniques, and program development in creative dramatics
applicable to the elementary and secondary school levels. P, 12
units of theatre arts and education. May be convened with 510.

414. Advanced Make-up (2) [Rpt./2] History and practical
application of theatrical make-up. Design and construct such
items as masks, prosthetic pieces, wigs and beards. P, 115. May
be convened with 514.

415. Theatre Graphics II: Drafting (3) I Advanced theatrical
perspective, scenographic and graphic techniques. P, 120. May be
convened with 515.

416. Theatre Graphics III: Rendering (3) [Rpt./3] II Advanced
practical color theory in pigment and illustration, rendering
mediums and techniques. P, 120. May be convened with 516.

419. Sound Design (3) II Advanced study in theatrical sound
production and design. P, 215 or consult department before
enrolling. May be convened with 519.

420. Advanced Lighting Design I (3) II Special problems, practice
and trends in designed light for theatrical productions. P, 220.
May be convened with 520.

421. Special Effects for Theatre (3) II Applied theory and
techniques associated with sound system and visual effects in the
theatre. 2R, 3L. May be convened with 521.

422. Theatrical Properties (3) [Rpt./2] I 1993-94 Construction
and collection of stage properties. Experimentation with the use
of materials and techniques. May be convened with 522.

423. Scene Painting (3) I 1994-95 Techniques and methods of
scenic painting. May be convened with 523.

424. Advanced Scenic Design I (3) I Advanced techniques and
methods of scenic design. P, 223. May be convened with 524.

427. Advanced Stage Costume Construction I (3) II Advanced
techniques in costume construction, including period pattern
design, cutting and draping techniques. P, 116. May be convened
with 527.

429. Advanced Stage Costume Design I (3) I Advanced techniques in
costume design. P, 116. May be convened with 529.

430. Stage Management (3) I Principles and techniques of stage
management, practical applications, problems and analysis of
stage managing. P, 111, 151. May be convened with 530.

431. Audience Development (3) I Publicity, press releases, sales,
advertising, display techniques, subscription procedures. P, 12
units of theatre arts or related arts fields. May be convened
with 531.

432. Theatre Management (3) II Amateur, educational and
professional theatre organization and management; theatrical
contracts, professional unions and representative organizations.
P, 12 units of theatre arts or related arts fields. May be
convened with 532.

439. Theatre Graphics IV: Model Making (3) Study of the purposes,
materials, tools, and techniques of scenographic model
construction through practical application. P, 415. May be
convened with 539.

440. History of the Modern Theatre (3) I II Major movements,
plays, and theories in theatrical art from 1915 to the present.
P, 145. For majors only.

442. Advanced Stage Lighting II (3) I An advanced study of
lighting design; theoretical (light plots) and practical (light
lab) projects. P, 420/520. May be convened with 542.

449. Acting V (3) I Intensive study of classical acting styles
with emphasis on Shakespeare. Individual and group performance.
2R, 2S. P, 251 and audition. May be convened with 549.

451. Acting VI (3) II Intensive study of classical acting styles
with emphasis on Commedia dell'arte, Moliere and English
Restoration.  Individual and group performance. 2R, 2S. P, 305,
449, audition. May be convened with 551.

452. Acting VII (3) I [Rpt./1] Audition material, techniques and
research into problems of a professional career in the theatre,
television, motion pictures and related fields. 2R, 2S. P, 305,
449, audition. May be convened with 552.

453. Acting VIII (3) II Intensive scene study and character
analysis. Survey and review of major modern acting theories and
techniques.  2R, 2S. P, 452, audition. May be convened with 553.

455. Directing I (3) I Basic techniques of stage directing
including play analysis, director-actor communication and
technical problems of movement, composition, picturization and
blocking. 2R, 2S. May be convened with 555.

456. Directing II (3) II Techniques of stage direction with the
study of factors leading to a completed production; special
attention given to director-designer communication and the
production process. Direction of one-act plays. 2R, 2S. P, 455.
May be convened with 556.

460a-460b. Writing for Stage and Screen (3-3) Preparation and
analysis of short scripts for stage and motion pictures.
Recommended for senior-level students only. Writing-Emphasis
course for cinema option (General Fine Arts Studies Major). P,
satisfaction of the upper-division writing-proficiency
requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis Courses" in the Academic
Guidelines section of this catalog). May be convened with 560a-
560b.

461. Artist Collaboration (2) [Rpt./2] II The development and
communication of a visual idea for performance art; exploring all
mediums of visual and aural communication. May be convened with
561.

468. Dialects in Performance (3) Application of suitable phonetic
theory toward a systems approach to acquiring dialects for
performance in stage, television and radio presentations. 1R, 4S.
P, ability to do close transcription in International Phonetic
Alphabet (IPA). May be convened with 568.

475. Screen Acting Techniques (3) II Principles and techniques of
various performance methods involved in acting for television and
motion pictures; basic problems faced by the professional actor
seeking employment in these media; on camera experience with
directed exercises and dramatic scenes. 2R, 3L. P, 151, audition.
May be convened with 575.

495. Colloquium
a. Evaluation of Dance and Body Technique (3) I (Identical with
DNC 495a)

496. Seminar
d. Dance-Related Art Forms (3) II 1994-95 (Identical with DNC
496d, which is home) May be convened with 596d.

497. Workshop
a. Technical Production (1-6) [Rpt./20 units] I II S May be
convened with 597a.
b. Costume Production (1-6) [Rpt./20 units] I II S May be
convened with 597b.
c. Lighting Production (1-6) [Rpt./20 units] I II S May be
convened with 597c.
d. Sound Production (1-6) [Rpt./20 units] I II S May be convened
with 597d.
e. Scenic Production (1-6) [Rpt./20 units] I II S May be convened
with 597e.
f. Performance (1-6) [Rpt./20 units] I II S May be convened with
597f.

501. Advanced Stagecraft I (3) I For a description of course
topics, see 401. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional creative and/or research project. P, 111. May be
convened with 401.

502. Combat for the Stage (1) [Rpt./1] I II For a description of
course topics, see 402. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional performance and/or research project. Open to majors
only. May be convened with 402.

503. Musical Theatre II (3) I For a description of course topics,
see 403. Graduate-level requirements include an additional
creative and/or research project. Open to majors only. P,
audition. May be convened with 403.

504. Musical Theatre III (3) II For a description of course
topics, see 404. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional performance and/or research project. Open to majors
only. P, 304 and audition. May be convened with 404.

510. Methods of Teaching Creative Drama (3) I For a description
of course topics, see 410. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional creative and/or research paper. May be convened with
410.

514. Advanced Make-up (2) [Rpt./2] For a description of course
topics, see 414. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional creative and/or research paper. P, 115. May be
convened with 414.

515. Theatre Graphics II: Drafting (3) I For a description of
course topics, see 415. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional creative and/or research project. P, 120. May be
convened with 415.

516. Theatre Graphics III: Rendering (3) [Rpt./3] II For a
description of course topics, see 416. Graduate-level
requirements include an additional creative and/or research
project. P, 120. May be convened with 416.

519. Sound Design (3) II For a description of course topics, see
419. Graduate-level requirements include an additional creative
and/or research project. P, 215 or consult department before
enrolling. May be convened with 419.

520. Advanced Lighting Design I (3) II For a description of
course topics, see 420. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional creative and/or research project. P, 220. May be
convened with 420.

521. Special Effects for Theatre (3) II For a description of
course topics, see 421. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional creative and/or research project. May be convened with
421.

522. Theatrical Properties (3) [Rpt./2] I 1993-94 For a
description of course topics, see 422. Graduate-level
requirements include an additional creative and/or research
project. May be convened with 422.

523. Scene Painting (3) I 1994-95 For a description of course
topics, see 423. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional creative and/or research project. May be convened with
423.

524. Advanced Scenic Design I (3) II For a description of course
topics, see 424. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional creative and/or research project. P, 223. May be
convened with 424.

527. Advanced Stage Costume Construction I (3) II For a
description of course topics, see 427. Graduate-level
requirements include an additional creative and/or research
project. P, 116. May be convened with 427.

529. Advanced Stage Costume Design I (3) I For a description of
course topics, see 429. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional creative and/or research project. P, 116. May be
convened with 429.

530. Stage Management (3) I For a description of course topics,
see 430. Graduate-level requirements include an additional
creative and/or research project. P, 111, 151. May be convened
with 430.

531. Audience Development (3) I For a description of course
topics, see 431. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth
research paper or project. P, 12 units of theatre arts or related
arts fields. May be convened with 431.

532. Theatre Management (3) II For a description of course
topics, see 432. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth
research paper or project. P, 12 units of theatre arts or related
arts fields. May be convened with 432.

539. Theatre Graphics IV: Model Making (3) For a description of
course topics, see 439. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional creative and/or research project. May be convened with
439.

541. Scenography (3) The integration of scenery, costume, make-
up, light and sound into a total production design.

542. Advanced Stage Lighting II (3) I For a description of course
topics, see 442. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional creative and/or research project. P, 420/520. May be
convened with 442.

546. Dance Program Administration (3) II 1994-95 (Identical with
DNC 546)

549. Acting V (3) I For a description of course topics, see 449.
Graduate-level requirements include an additional performance
and/or research project. P, 251 and audition. May be convened
with 449.

550. Literary Resources for Choreography (3) II 1993-94 [Rpt./1]
(Identical with DNC 550)

551. Acting VI (3) II For a description of course topics, see
451. Graduate-level requirements include an additional
performance and/or research project. P, 305, 449, audition. May
be convened with 451.

552. Acting VII (3) I [Rpt./1] For a description of course
topics, see 452. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional performance and/or research project. P, 305, 449,
audition. May be convened with 452.

553. Acting VIII (3) II For a description of course topics, see
453. Graduate-level requirements include an additional
performance and/or a research project. P, 452, audition. May be
convened with 553.

555. Directing I (3) I For a description of course topics, see
455. Graduate-level requirements include an additional
performance and/or research project. May be convened with 455.

556. Directing II (3) II For a description of course topics, see
456. Graduate-level requirements include an additional
performance and/or research project. P, 455. May be convened with
456.

560a-560b. Writing for Stage and Screen (3-3) For a description
of course topics, see 460a-460b. Graduate-level requirements
include the preparation of full-length scripts for stage and
motion pictures. May be convened with 460a-460b.

561. Artist Collaboration (2) [Rpt./2] 1994-95 For a description
of course topics, see 461. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional creative and/or research project. May be convened with
461.

568. Dialects in Performance (3) For a description of course
topics, see 468. Graduate-level requirements include a close
transcription of a selected dialect or dialects from oral
presentation and a suitable analysis of the articulatory
features. P, ability to do close transcription in International
Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). May be convened with 468.

575. Screen Acting Techniques (3) II For a description of course
topics, see 475. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional performance and/or research project. P, 151, audition.
May be convened with 475.

595. Colloquium
a. Evaluation of Dance and Body Techniques (3) I (Identical with
DNC 595a)

596. Seminar
d. Dance-Related Art Forms (3) II 1994-95 (Identical with DNC
596d, which is home) May be convened with 496d.

597.  Workshop
a. Technical Production (1-6) [Rpt./20 units] I II S May be
convened with 497a.
b. Costume Production (1-6) [Rpt./20 units] I II S May be
convened with 497b.
c. Lighting Production (1-6) [Rpt./20 units] I II S May be
convened with 497c.
d. Sound Production (1-6) [Rpt./20 units] I II S May be convened
with 497d.
e. Scenic Production (1-6) [Rpt./20 units] I II S May be convened
with 497e.
f. Performance (1-6) [Rpt./20 units] I II S May be convened with
497f.

600. Introduction to Graduate Study of Drama (3) I Methods and
materials for research in theatre and drama; introduction to the
bibliography of these fields; organization and form of thesis.

605. Advanced Voice and Movement for the Actor I (3) [Rpt./1] I
Advanced study and exercise in voice and movement for the actor:
relaxation, breathing, physical and vocal freedom, resonance,
articulation and improvisation including the Linklater Approach,
I.P.A., and Neutral Mask. 6S. P, audition.

606. Advanced Voice and Movement for the Actor II (3) [Rpt./1] II
Continued advanced study and exercise in voice and movement for
the actor: standard stage speech, stage dialects, period customs,
manners and movement. 6S. P, audition.

640. Dramatic Criticism: Tragedy (3) I Comparative analysis of
tragedy and theories of tragedy from antiquity to the present for
stage and screen; writing of critical papers.

641. Dramatic Criticism: Comedy (3) II Comparative analysis of
comedy and comic theory from antiquity to the present for stage
and screen; writing of critical papers.

642.  Advanced Studies in Theatre History (3) [Rpt./1] I II
Concentrated study in theatre history, with major emphasis on the
physical theatre, standard scholarly works, and source materials.

644. History of the American Theatre (3) II Studies in the
American theatre and drama. Directed and individual projects will
be assigned.

646a-646b. Theories of the Theatre I II (3-3) 646a: I  646b: II
1994-95 A year-long study of theories of theatrical performance
and dramatic composition. The first semester covers select
theories from the Greeks thorugh Neoclassicism. The second
semester treats theories from Romanticism to the present.

650. Experimental Theatre I (3) I Post-Stanislavsky experimental
theatre techniques and theories of the first half of the
twentieth century. Rehearsal and performance of select projects.

655. Advanced Directing I (3) I Techniques of stage directing,
including play analysis, director-actor communication, director-
designer communication, blocking, movement, composition; use of
directorial style and the adaptation of directorial philosophies.
2R, 2S.

656. Advanced Directing II (3) II Techniques of analyzing and
staging classical texts for a contemporary audience; use of
directorial style and the adaptation of directorial philosophies
with an emphasis on staging the plays of Shakespeare. 2R, 2S. P,
449, 655.

696.* Seminar
a. Contemporary Trends (1-3) [Rpt./6 units] I II
b. Special Topics in Acting (1-3) [Rpt./6 units] I II
c. Special Topics in Directing (1-3) [Rpt./6 units] I II
d. Musical Theatre Production (1-3) [Rpt./6 units] I II
e. Special Topics in Playwriting (3) [Rpt./6 units] P, permission
of instructor.
h. Special Topics in Stage Costume Construction (1-3) [Rpt./6
units] I
i. Period Design Style (1-3) [Rpt./6 units] II
l. Special Topics in Costume Design (2-3) [Rpt./6 units] P, 429.
m. Special Topics in Design (2) [Rpt./6 units] I P, 401/501.

* Students may earn a maximum of 9 units in T AR 696, with a
maximum of 6 units in any one area.

Toxicology

(See Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy)

 


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