The University of Arizona  1993-95 General Catalog

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Soil and Water Science (S W)
Shantz Building, Room 429
(520) 621-1646

Professors Peter J. Wierenga, Head, Hinrich L. Bohn, Roger L.
Caldwell, Gordon R. Dutt (Emeritus), Wallace H. Fuller
(Emeritus), Charles P. Gerba, Ian L. Pepper, Donald F. Post, Jack
L. Stroehlein (Emeritus), Thomas C. Tucker (Emeritus), Arthur W.
Warrick

Associate Professors David M. Hendricks, Alfredo R. Huete, Allan
D. Matthias

Assistant Professors Mark L. Brusseau, Raina M. Miller, Thomas L.
Thompson

Adjunct Assistant Professor Mary S. Moran

Assistant Research Scientist Janick F. Artiola

Associate Research Scientist Charles A. Sanchez

Extension Specialists Paul W. Brown, Thomas A. Doerge, Jeffrey C.
Silvertooth (Plant Sciences), John E. Watson

The Department of Soil and Water Science provides students with a
broad background in soil science and water quality, with emphasis
on soil-plant-water relationships or environmental aspects of
land and water use. The department offers the Bachelor of Science
in Agriculture, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy
degrees with a major in soil and water science.

All undergraduate students majoring in soil and water science
must satisfy the general education requirements of the College of
Agriculture, and must complete the following courses: CHEM 103a-
103b, 104a-104b; 241a or 322, 323; PHYS 102a, 180a; MCB 181; GEOS
101 or 110; and MATH 123. The University Writing-Emphasis Course
requirement can be met by completion of S W 411, 426, 450, 461 or
470.

A major with an emphasis in soil-plant-water relationships must
complete S W 200, 201, 316, 317, 431; ABE 250 or 404; S W 411,
470.

A major with an emphasis in environmental science must complete S
W 200, 201, 411, 425; AREC 217; POL 481; and two of the
following: S W 431, 450, 453, 470; HWR 250. SW 105, 106 are
recommended but not required for majors with an emphasis in
environmental science.

Students are encouraged to take additional classes in chemistry,
physics, mathematics, biology, and geosciences, as well as
classes in computer science and statistics.

A minor in soil and water science, emphasizing either soil-plant-
water relationships or environmental science, is available to
students from other disciplines. Requirements include S W 200,
201, and three of the following: S W 105 and 106, 316 and 317,
411, 431, and 470. In addition, students must take 6 units (at
least 3 upper-division units) of geosciences, hydrology,
irrigation, or soil and water science.

Courses listed in this department satisfy the 13-unit College of
Agriculture requirement for microbiology undergraduate majors.

The environmental science major is interdisciplinary and leads to
the Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science. It is
administered through the Department of Soil and Water Science,
with an advisory committee formed from the Departments of Civil
Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, Chemistry, Ecology and
Evolutionary Biology, Economics, Geology, Hydrology and Water
Resources, Soil and Water Science, and Toxicology.

There are four program areas: land and water emphasis, biology
emphasis, environmental health emphasis, environmental
engineering sciences emphasis. The major is a science-oriented
curriculum, and provides a strong background in the chemical,
biological, and physical sciences. The environmental science
major provides students with an understanding of the scientific
processes that affect pollution of land, water and air.

The general education requirements are set by each college. The
degree will allow a student to use the general education
requirements for any college, as long as two conditions are
satisfied: the full requirements for a particular college will be
met, and the additional requirements for environmental science
will be met.

The B.S. in Environmental Science curriculum consists of several
core groupings. The basic sciences and mathematics core includes:
CHEM 103a-103b, 104a-104b, 241a, 243a, MATH 124, STAT 263, PHYS
102a, MIC 205, and ECOL 181a. The environmental sciences core
includes: S W 405 or CHEM 325/326, S W 493 (internship), AREC
217, POL 481, OSH 486, and three courses selected from advanced
environmental science, toxicology, and regulations. SW 105, 106
are recommended but not required for environmental science
majors. In addition to these two core areas, students select one
of the four emphasis areas described above. Suggested curricula
and course listings are available from the department.

105. Introduction to Environmental Science: Land, Water and Air
(3) I II Introduction to contemporary environmental issues and
their relationship to physical, chemical, and biological
principles. Discussion and evaluation of risks and tradeoffs in
addressing solutions to environmental pollution. Optional field
trip. P, high school chemistry recommended; CR, 106 encouraged.
Caldwell

106. Environmental Science Laboratory: Land, Water and Air (1) I
II Laboratory exercises and field trip experiences to study
environmental problems related to land, water, and air resources.
Basic physical, chemical and biological principles that relate to
understanding environmental problems will be stressed. Field
trips. P, algebra and high school chemistry recommended.

197. Workshop
a. Issues in Environmental Protection (1) S Field trips. Offered
only through the Horizons Unlimited Summer Program.

200. Soils (3) I II GRD Fundamental principles of soil science--
origin, nature, and constitution of soils; their chemical,
physical, and biological properties in relation to plant growth
and the nonplant uses of soils. P, CHEM 101a and 102a or 103a and
104a. Post

201. Soils Laboratory (1) I II CDT Laboratory exercises for 200.
P, CR, 200.

250. Water and Its Uses (3) I GRD Identical with ABE 250)

305. Pollution Science (3) II Introduction to abiotic and biotic
scientific processes within the soil/water/atmosphere continuum
that affects that fate and transport of pollutants. Evaluation of
the extent, fate, mitigation and impact of environmental
pollution. P, CHEM 241a, MIC 205, MATH 125a, PHYS 102.

316. Soil Fertility and Plant Nutrition (3) II Chemical and
biological properties of soil as they affect soil nutrient
availability and crop production. Principles of plant nutrition
and nutrient acquisition will also be discussed. Additional
topics are fertilizers and fertilization, irrigation water
quality, soil salinity, environmental impacts of fertilizers, and
principles of soil and plant tissue testing. P, 200. Thompson

317. Soil Fertility and Plant Nutrition Laboratory (1) II
Practical discussion and application of the principles of soil
fertility and plant nutrition. Laboratory and greenhouse
exercises involve soil and plant tissue testing and fertilizer
response experiments. Field trips demonstrate crop production
field experimentation, and use of soil as a medium for waste
disposal. Field trip. P, CR, 316. Thompson

330. Introduction to Remote Sensing (3) I (Identical with GEOG
330)

401. Management of Arid Lands and Salt-Affected Soils (3) II
Principles and practices of soil, water and crop management under
arid and semiarid conditions, the use of diagnostic procedures
for evaluating soils and waters, reclamation, and economics of
irrigation project development. 2R, 3L. Field trips. P, 200, 201.
May be convened with 501.

404. Irrigation Principles and Management (3) II GRD (Identical
with ABE 404) May be convened with 504.

405. Environmental and Soil Analysis (3) II Principles and
methods of chemical analysis of soils, water and biological
materials emphasizing properties of agricultural and
environmental significance. 1R, 6L. P, CHEM 322, 323; PHYS 102b,
180b. May be convened with 505. Hendricks, Artiola, Brusseau

411. Soil Chemistry (3) I CDT Soil chemical interactions with
water, air, plants and pollutants. 2R, 3L. P, 200, CHEM 103b,
104b. May be convened with 511. Writing-Emphasis Course. P,
satisfaction of the upper-division writing-proficiency
requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis Courses" in the Academic
Policies and Graduation Requirements section of this catalog).
Bohn/Hendricks

417. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3) II
(Identical with RNR 417) May be convened with 517.

421a-421b. Microbiological Techniques (3-3) (Identical with MIC
421a-421b)

425. Environmental Microbiology (3) I (Identical with MIC 425)
May be convened with 525.

426. Environmental Microbiology Laboratory (2) I Basic techniques
for isolation and characterization of environmental soil and
water microflora including methods for enumeration and
measurement of physiological activity. P, 425. (Identical with
MIC 426) May be convened with 526.

428. Microbial Genetics (3) II (Identical with PL P 428)

430. Environmental Monitoring (3) I Theory and application of
environmental measurements to the sampling and monitoring of
groundwater, soil, surface water, and near-surface atmospheric
systems. 1R, 6L. P, HWR 450 or SW 411 or equivalent. May be
convened with 530. Artiola/Brusseau/Matthias

431. Soil Morphology, Classification and Survey (3) I Theory and
practice of describing characteristics of soils; principles of
soil classification and the classification systems; methods and
applications of soil surveys. 2R, 3L. Field trips. P, 200, 201.
May be convened with 531. Post

440. Biodegradation of Pollutants in Soil and Groundwater (3) II
1993-94 Description of modern pollution problems and potential
biological remediation techniques focusing on the chemistry,
biochemistry and molecular biology of biodegradation of hazardous
and toxic compounds. P, MIC 425. May be convened with 540.
(Identical with MIC 440) Miller

450. Anticipating the Future: Focus on Environment (3) II
Techniques to understand broad issues about the future with focus
on environmental topics. Uses computer conferencing and
significant student discussion with opportunities for team
approaches and reporting. P, upper-division standing. May be
convened with 550. Caldwell Writing-Emphasis Course. P,
satisfaction of the upper-division writing-proficiency
requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis Courses" in the Academic
Policies and Graduation Requirements section of this catalog).

453. Remote Sensing of the Environment (3) II Remote sensing
techniques and applications for improved natural resource
utilization of soils, water, grasslands, and forest. Fundamental
energy-matter interactions that influence the spectral
characteristics of vegetation, soil, and water. 2R, 3L. Field
trips. P, 330 or PHYS 102b. May be convened with 553. Huete

461. Soil and Water Conservation (3) S 1994-95 Consideration of
major world soil and water conservation problems and solutions;
principles of soil erosion by wind and water and their effects on
world food problems. 2R, 3L. Field trips. P, 200. May be convened
with 561. Post

464. Environmental Chemodynamics (3) II Physical and chemical
processes influencing the behavior of contaminants in the
subsurface environment. Includes equilibrium and kinetic theory
of solubilization-dissolution, volatilization, sorption,
hydrolysis, photolysis, surface catalysis, and radioactive decay.
P, CHEM 103b, 480a, PHYS 110. May be convened with 564. Brusseau

466. Soil and Groundwater Restoration (3) II 1994-95 Methods for
remediation contaminated soil and groundwater; factors
influencing efficacy of remediation systems. Emphasis on
scientific basis of restoration. May be convened with 566.
Brusseau

470. Soil Physics (3) II CDT Soil structure and physical
constitution of soils; the physical properties of soil-water
systems, movement and exchange of gases in the soil, and physical
laws governing the movement and availability of soil water. 2R,
3L. P, 200, PHYS 102b, CR, MATH 125a. May be convened with 570.
Warrick

475. Freshwater Algae (4) II 1993-94 (Identical with ECOL 475)

490. Remote Sensing for the Study of Planet Earth (3) II 1993-94
(Identical with REM 490) May be convened with 590.

501. Management of Arid Lands and Salt-Affected Soils (3) II For
a description of course topics, see 401. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth research paper on a single
aspect of a current topic. Field trip. P, 200, 201. May be
convened with 401.

504. Irrigation Principles and Management (3) II GRD (Identical
with ABE 504) May be convened with 404.

505. Environmental and Soil Analysis (3) II For a description of
course topics, see 405. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research paper on a single aspect of a current topic. P,
CHEM 323, PHYS 102b, 180b. May be convened with 405.
Hendricks/Artiola/Brusseau.

511. Soil Chemistry (3) I CDT For a description of course topics,
see 411. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research
paper on a single aspect of a current topic. 2R, 3L. P, 200, CHEM
103b, 104b. May be convened with 411. Bohn/Hendricks

517. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3) II
(Identical with RNR 517) May be convened with 417.

520. Physics of Plant Environments (3) I 1993-94 Principles of
energy, momentum, and gaseous exchanges within the environments
of agricultural land surfaces; emphasis on models and
measurements of potential and actual evaporation of water. P,
MATH 125b, PHYS 102b. Matthias

525. Environmental Microbiology (3) I (Identical with MBIM 525)
May be convened with 425.

526. Environmental Microbiology Laboratory (2) I For a
description of course topics, see 426. Graduate-level
requirements include additional assignments. P, 525 (Identical
with MBIM 526) May be convened with 426.

530. Environmental Monitoring (3) I For a description of course
topics, see 430. Graduate-level requirements include preparation
of a term project. 1R, 6L. P, HWR 450 or 517 or SW 511 or
equivalent. May be convened with 430. Artiola/Brusseau/Matthias

531. Soil Morphology, Classification and Survey (3) I For a
description of course topics, see 431. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth research paper on a single
aspect of a current topic. Field trips. P, 200, 201. May be
convened with 431. Post

540. Biodegradation of Pollutants in Soil and Groundwater (3) II
1993-94 For a description of course topics, see 440. Graduate-
level requirements include a short oral presentation about a
recent journal article and a paper pertaining to recent advances
in biodegradation studies. P, MBIM 525. May be convened with 440.
(Identical with MBIM 540) Miller

541. Soil Genesis (3) II 1994-95 Physical and chemical processes
and mineralogy of weathering and soil formation; quantitative
pedology; the soil as part of the ecosystem. Field trips. P, GEOS
101 and CHEM 103b. (Identical with GEOS 541) Hendricks

546. Environmental Biotechnology (2) II 1994-95 Molecular methods
for detection of microorganisms in the environment. Fate and
survival of introduced organisms in the environment. Molecular
mechanisms of microbial inactivation in waste treatment systems
and microbial risk assessment. P, 525 (Identical with MBIM 546)

550. Anticipating the Future: Focus on Environment (3) II For a
description of course topics, see 450. Graduate-level
requirements include a report in an area of special interest. 
May be convened with 450.

553. Remote Sensing of the Environment (3) II For a description
of course topics, see 453. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research paper on a single aspect of a current topic.
Field trips. P, 330 or PHYS 102b. May be convened with 453. Huete

561. Soil and Water Conservation (3) I 1994-95 For a description
of course topics, see 461. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research paper on a single aspect of a current topic.
Field trips. P, 200. May be convened with 461. Post

564. Environmental Chemodynamics (3) II For a description of
course topics, see 464. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research project. May be convened with 464.. Brusseau

565. Contaminant Transport in Porous Media (3) II 1994-95 The
transport of contaminants in the subsurface environment. Effects
of dispersion, interphase mass transfer, transformation
reactions, and porous-media heterogeneity on transport; covers
aqueous (dissolved) and multiphase (immiscible liquid, gas)
systems. P, 570 or HWR 518 or 531. (Identical with WS M 565)
Brusseau

566. Soil and Groundwater Restoration (3) II 1993-94 For a
description of course topics, see 466. Graduate-level
requirements include a research paper. May be convened with 466.
Brusseau

570. Soil Physics (3) II CDT For a description of course topics,
see 470. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research
paper on a single aspect of a current topic. P, 200, PHYS 102b,
CR, MATH 125a. May be convened with 470. Warrick

573. Monitoring Biosphere Processes (2) I 1994-95 Global-scale
interactions of soils with their plant cover and climate. The
spatial distributions and dynamics of soil-plant-water processes
with emphasis on measurements from space. P, 200; 330 or 453.
Huete

590. Remote Sensing for the Study of Planet Earth (3) II 1993-94
(Identical with REM 590) May be convened with 490.

602. Soil-Plant Relationships (3) I Principles of soil solution
and colloid chemistry, soil-water relationships, soil
microbiology, and plant physiology and metabolism will be
discussed. These principles will be applied to processes of soil
nutrient cycling, nutrient availability, and plant growth. P,
200. Thompson

605. Soil-Water Dynamics (3) II 1994-95 Water flow in soils;
closely related problems of solute, pollutant, and heat transfer;
emphasis on current concepts and research. P, MATH 254.
(Identical with ABE 605 and HWR 605) Warrick

694. Practicum
a. Advanced Soil Chemistry (3) I 1994-95 P, 411, CHEM 480a.

696. Seminar
a. Topics in Soil, Water and Environmental Science (1) [Rpt./4] I
II
 

 


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