The University of Arizona  1993-95 General Catalog

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Spanish and Portuguese (SPAN/PORT)
Modern Languages Building, Room 545
(520) 621-3123

Professors Charles M. Tatum, Head, Leo L. Barrow, A. Dolores
Brown (Emerita), Jack Emory Davis (Emeritus), John J. Gilabert,
Lanin A. Gyurko, Richard P. Kinkade, Miguel Mendez, Dana A.
Nelson, Jose Promis, Eliana S. Rivero

Associate Professors Gilbert E. Evans, Karl C. Gregg, Judith
Nantell, Karen L. Smith, H. Reynolds Stone

Assistant Professors Maria Jose Barbosa, June Jaramillo, Ana
Perches, Robert N. Smead, Amy Williamsen, Mary Zampini

Lecturers Adalberto Guerrero (Emeritus), M. Nivea Pereira Parsons

The Department of Spanish and Portuguese offers courses in
language skills, linguistics, pedagogy, grammar and composition,
literature, and culture. There is an alternate track designed
especially for native speakers of Spanish with courses in
language and culture, culminating in creative writing and a
variety of classes in Mexican and Mexican-American literature.
The department provides academic direction in summer programs in
Spanish at the Guadalajara Summer School in Mexico, in summer and
year programs in Spain, and in Portuguese in a semester program
in Rio de Janeiro.

The department offers programs leading to the following degrees:
Bachelor of Arts with a major in Spanish, with a specialization
in either language and culture or in Hispanic language and
linguistics; or the Bachelor of Arts with a major in Portuguese,
with a specialization in language and literature; the Bachelor of
Arts in Education with a teaching major in Spanish; Master of
Arts with a major in Spanish, and an emphasis in either
literature or language and linguistics; the Master of Arts in
Education with a teaching major in Spanish; and the Doctor of
Philosophy with a major in Spanish. For further information
regarding the graduate programs, please consult the Graduate
Catalog.

The major in Spanish for the B.A. shall consist of 36 upper-
division units, consisting of two qualifying courses of three
units each, plus 30 upper-division units, with a primary
concentration in either language and linguistics or in language
and literature (eight courses minimum) and a secondary emphasis
(two courses minimum) in the alternate area.

Contact the department for specific course requirements.

In the language and literature concentration all students will
complete three survey courses: 400, 401 and 403. A senior thesis
in literature is an option for the literature major, and is under
the direction of a student-selected faculty mentor. The course
will be devoted to the creation of an original research paper by
the student, and is conceived as an introduction to literary
research methods and materials by the faculty mentor.

The complementary language/linguistic component shall consist of
425 or 450, and one linguistics course.

The language and linguistics concentration courses are being
revised. Please contact the department for specific requirements.

The complementary literature component shall consist of 350 and
either 400, 401 or 403.

The major in Portuguese for the B.A. shall consist of 30 units,
beginning with 206 or higher

The supporting minor for majors in Spanish or Portuguese:
recommended subjects are classics, drama, English, philosophy,
other modern languages, humanities, history and theory of art or
music, journalism, speech, anthropology, political science,
business, economics, history, linguistics, psychology, sociology,
or other subjects as may be individually justified.

The teaching major for the B.A. in Education: 24 units in upper-
division Spanish to include the following courses: 340, 350, 425
or 450, and one of the literature surveys (400, 401, or 403) and
one of the cultural surveys (430, 431 and 457 or 473.

The teaching minor for the B.A. in Education: 20 units in
Spanish, including 325, 340, and 350.

Spanish 101, 102, 201, 202 and Portuguese 101, 102 are for the
student who is learning a second language. Spanish and Portuguese
205 and 206 are for the student who has already learned a second
language, preferably a Romance language. SPAN 203, 253a-253b,
323, 333, comprise the alternate track in communication skills
for native speakers of Spanish.

Students will be placed in the proper class level according to
one or more of the following factors: previous experience or
study, departmental placement examinations, individual
counseling. Placement examinations are given during the summer to
incoming freshmen and during the week of registration preceding
the fall and the spring semesters to all students in need of
advising or placement. Non-credit proficiency examinations are
available during registration and the first week of classes for
students interested in challenging 300-level language courses; no
credit or grade is given for this type of intra-departmental
examination. Consult an undergraduate advisor. For information
about proficiency examinations with credit, consult the Academic
Policies and Graduation Requirements section of this catalog.

The four-semester language proficiency requirement may be
satisfied by completing with a passing grade SPAN 202, 203, 206
or PORT 206. It may also be satisfied by placing in the fifth
semester on the departmental placement examination or through
Advanced Placement examinations. Once a course in a grammar or
language-skill sequence is successfully completed, no lower
numbered course taken subsequently in that sequence will count
toward the major.

Writing-Emphasis Course: Since writing in all upper-division
courses is in either Spanish or Portuguese, the completion of
either 325 or 425 will constitute the fulfillment of a bilingual
proficiency in composition.

The department participates in the honors program.

For further information, contact your advisor and those of the
Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

Spanish (SPAN)

101. First Semester Spanish (4) GRD Oral approach. For the
student with no previous experience in Spanish.

102. Second Semester Spanish (4) GRD Oral approach. P, 101 or
placement by examination.

201. Second Year Spanish (4) GRD Credit allowed for 201 or 203,
but not for both. P, 102 or placement by examination.

202. Second Year Spanish (4) GRD Credit allowed for 202 or 333,
but not for both. P, 201 or placement by examination.

203. Oral Communication in Spanish (4) Designed for native
speakers of Spanish only; considered to be at the third-semester
level. Credit allowed for this course or 201, but not for both.
(Identical with MAS 203)

204a-204b-204c. Intensive Spanish (8-8-8) Offered in Guadalajara
only. 204a is the equivalent of 101 and 102. 204b is the
equivalent of 102 and 201. 204c is the equivalent of 201 and 202.
P, recommended for highly motivated students and/or those with
experience in another Romance language.

205. Intensive Spanish (4) 205 is the equivalent of 101 and 102.
Recommended for highly motivated students and/or those with
experience in another Romance language.

206. Intensive Spanish (4) 206 is the equivalent of 201 and 202.
Recommended for highly motivated students and/or those with
experience in another Romance language. P, 205.

251a-251b. Intermediate Spanish (3-3) I II CDT Combines all forms
of language skills (speaking, reading, writing, and
comprehension) with intermediate grammar. Credit is allowed for
this course or 253a-253b, but not both. P, 202.

253a-253b. Comprehensive Spanish for the Native Speaker of
Spanish (3-3) I II Speaking, reading and writing skills; designed
for the native speaker of Spanish with some formal study of the
language. Students receiving credit for this course will not
receive credit for 251a-251b, 325, or 330. (Identical with MAS
253a-253b)

277. Eroticism and Love in the Middle Ages (3) I II S (Identical
with GER 277)

285. Introduction to Humanities (3) S (Identical with GER 285)

302. Intensive Spanish, Fifth and Sixth Semesters (6) GRD S
Offered in Guadalajara only. For those who have completed four
semesters of college Spanish or equivalent. Will cover the 5th
and 6th semester Spanish. A complete immersion in the study of
intermediate Spanish, teaching all four skills. P, 202. Credit
allowed for this course or 325, but not for both.

323. Mexican-American Spanish and Bilingualism (3) I II Mexican-
American Spanish and bilingualism as a point of departure for
developing standard vocabulary and grammar at the intermediate
level. Credit is allowed for this course or 325, but not both. P,
253b.

325. Intermediate Grammar and Writing (3) I II P, 251b.

330. Intermediate Conversation (3) I II P, 325. (Identical with
LA S 330)

333. Writing and Oral Skills for the Native Speaker of Spanish
(3) I II P, 323. Credit is allowed for this course or 330, but
not both.

340. Phonetics (3) I II Offered for students who need to perfect
pronunciation and for non-native speakers of Spanish. P, 202 or
203.

343. Phonetics (3) I II Offered for native speakers of English
who need to perfect their Spanish pronunciation. P, 203. Credit
is allowed for this course or 340.

350. Readings in the Literary Genres (3) I II P, 251b. (Identical
with LA S 350)

371a-371b. Commercial and Technical Spanish (3-3) P, 253b or 330,
325. (Identical with LA S 371a-371b)

400. Survey of Spanish Literature (3) Introduction to Spanish
literature from the Middle Ages to the contemporary period. P,
350.

401. Survey of Spanish-American Literature (3) Introduction to
Spanish-American literature from the colonial to the contemporary
period.  P, 350. (Identical with LA S 401a-401b)

402. Survey of Mexican Literature (3) S Major works by Mexican
writers. Offered in Guadalajara only. P, five semesters of
Spanish. (Identical with LA S 402)

403. Mexican-American Literature (3) II Study of the literature,
in Spanish and English, created by the Mexican-American in the
United States. P, 350. (Identical with LA S 403, and MAS 403)

414. Teaching of Modern Languages (3) II (Identical with TTE 414)


415. Creative Writing in Spanish (3) II Practice in writing
poetry and fiction in Spanish. P, 450. (Identical with LA S 415)

422. Introduction to Romance Philology (3) I Survey of the
development of the modern Romance tongues from the Latin
language. P, knowledge of two Romance languages. (Identical with
FREN 422, ITAL 422 and PORT 422)

425. Advanced Grammar and Composition (3) I II Advanced Spanish
grammar and composition. P, 325 (Identical with LA S 425)

430. Spanish Civilization (3) I Spanish milieu; geographical,
political, and cultural aspects of Spanish civilization. P, 330,
333.

431. Spanish-American Civilization (3) II Spanish-American
milieu; geographical, political, and cultural aspects of Spanish-
American civilization. P, 330, 333.

433. Mexican American Civilization through Literature (3) I 1993-
94 P, 330/333.

436. Spanish Prose Fiction (3) II 1993-94 Spanish prose fiction
selections from the Middle Ages through the twentieth century.
Language of instruction is Spanish. P, 400.

437. Spanish Theater (3) I 1993-94 Spanish theater selections
from the middle ages through the twentieth century. P, 400.

438. Spanish Poetry (3) II Spanish poetry selections from the
Middle Ages through the twentieth century. Language of
instruction is Spanish. P, 400.

440. Spanish American Prose Fiction (3) II Spanish American prose
fiction selections of the nineteenth and twentieth century.
Language of instruction is Spanish. P, 401.

441. Children's Literature in Spanish (3) I Survey of children's
literature in Spanish, with special attention to the needs of
American schools and libraries. P, 350. (Identical with LA S 441,
LI S 441 and MAS 441)

442. Spanish American Theater (3) I 1993-94 Spanish American
theater selections from the colonial period to the present. P,
401.

443. Spanish American Poetry (3) II Spanish American poetry
selections from the pre-Columbian period. P, 350.

444. Mexican and Mexican-American Prose Fiction (3) I
Introduction to Mexican and Mexican-American prose fiction with
emphasis on the contemporary period. P, 350. (Identical with LA S
444 and MAS 444)

445. Novel of the Mexican Revolution (3) I How the revolution of
1910 has been portrayed by Mexico's leading writers. P, 350.
(Identical with LA S 445)

446. Mexican and Mexican-American Theater (3) I Introduction to
Mexican and Mexican-American theater with emphasis on the
Contemporary period. P, 350. (Identical with LAS 446 and MAS 446)

447. Contemporary Mexican Literature (3) II S Major novelists of
modern Mexico; their works, narrative perspective,
characterization, language, time, space, and themes. P, 350.
(Identical with MAS 447)

449. Mexican and Mexican-American Film (3) II 1993-94 Major films
by Mexican and Mexican-American directors. Relationships of the
cinema to Mexican and Chicano literature and culture. P, 350.
(Identical with MAS 449)

450. Conversation and Writing Skills (3) I II Study and practice
in formal and informal usage of Spanish as oral communication. P,
330, 333.

452. Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (3) I II Survey of the
fields of phonology, morphology, semantics and syntax, and other
related topics. (Taught in Spanish) P, 425 (Identical with MAS
452.

453. Theory of Spanish Morphosyntax (3) Introduction to current
theories of syntax to describe specific phenomena. (Identical
with LING 453)

457. Applied Linguistics (3) I Application of linguistic theory,
including psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic approaches to
pedagogy. (Identical with LING 457)

473. Spanish for the Native Speaker of Spanish Classroom Teacher
(3) II Practical Spanish for the elementary and secondary school
subject-matter teacher who uses Spanish as the medium of
instruction. P, 253a or 325 or 330. (Identical with MAS 473)

485. Linguistic and Computer-assisted Approaches to Literature
(3) [Rpt./6 units] II (Identical with GER 485) May be convened
with 585.

501. Introduction to Hispanic Studies (3) II Broad view of fields
of research, faculty and courses to familiarize students with
some practical aspects of graduate studies, issues that pertain
to specific fields of research and questions currently being
debated across the profession.

510. Development of Spanish Medieval, Renaissance, and Golden Age
Literature (3) Spanish medieval, renaissance, and golden age
literature (short fiction, poetry, novel and drama) from the
twelfth through the seventeenth century.

511. Topics in Medieval Literature, Renaissance, and Golden Age
Literature (3) [Rpt./3 when topic varies] Representative topics
include the development of lyric poetry Mester de Clerecia,
Juglaria and Romanceron the development of prose; renaissance and
baroque prose; Renaissance and baroque poetry; Cervantes' Don
Quixote and other representative works; golden age drama of the
16th and 17th centuries; the Picaresque; the Spanish
enlightenment.

520. Development of Eighteenth, Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century
Spanish Literature (3) Spanish eighteenth, nineteenth, and
twentieth-century literature (short fiction, poetry, novel and
drama).

521. Topics in Eighteenth, Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century
Spanish Literature (3) [Rpt./3 when topic varies] Representative
topics include Spanish romanticism; nineteenth century realist
and naturalist Spanish prose; the generation of '98; modern
Spanish prose fiction; modern Spanish poetry; the contemporary
novel of the post-Franco era; contemporary Spanish poetry; modern
and contemporary Spanish theater.

530. Development of Spanish Literature from the Pre-Columbian
Period to Independence (3) Spanish American literature from the
Pre-Columbian period to independence (short fiction, poetry,
novel and drama). (Identical with LAS 530)

531. Topics in Spanish American Literature from the Pre-Columbian
Period to Independence (3) [Rpt./3 when topic varies]
Representative topics include pre-Columbian Aztec, Mayan, and
Maya-Quiche literature; the chronicle; Renaissance and baroque
poetry.

540. Development of Spanish American Nineteenth and Twentieth-
Century Literature (3) Spanish American nineteenth and twentiety-
century literature (short fiction, poetry, novel and drama).
(Identical with LAS 540)

541. Topics in Spanish American Nineteenth and Twentieth Century
Literature (3) [Rpt./3 when topic varies] Representative topics
include: nineteenth-century Hispanic-American prose fiction;
modernismo; modern Hispanic-American prose fiction; modern
Hispanic-American poetry; contemporary Hispanic-American prose
fiction; contemporary Hispanic-American poetry; modern and
contemporary Hispanic-American theater; trends in the Hispanic-
American short story.

550. Development of Mexican and Mexican American Literature (3)
Mexican and Mexican-American literature (short fiction, poetry,
novel and drama) (Identical with MAS 550)

551. Topics in Mexican and Mexican-American Literature (3)
[Rpt./3 when topic varies] Representative topics include: novel
of the Mexican revolution; trends in Mexican and Mexican-American
films; trends in contemporary Mexican literature; Mexican
American prose fiction since 1965; trends in Mexican-American
theater; major movements and authors of Mexican-American
literature.

561. Topics in Hispanic Literature (3) [Rpt./3 when topic varies]
Representative topics include Hispanic women writers; U. S.
Hispanic literature; trends in modern and contemporary Spanish
film; trends in modern and contemporary Hispanic American film.

571. Topics in Literary Theory and Criticism (3) [Rpt./3 when
topic varies] Topics include historical overview of major
developments in literary theory and criticism with theoretical
and critical analysis of Hispanic texts.

574. Linguistic Perspectives on Mexican-American Spanish and
Bilingualism (3) I II For a description of course topics, see
474. Graduate-level requirements include two examinations and a
tape/analysis. P, 340. (Identical with LING 574 and MAS 574) May
be convened with 474.

580. Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (3) [Rpt./2 when topic
varies] Introduction to Hispanic linguistics. Representative
topics include introduction to Spanish phonology, introduction to
Spanish morpho-syntax, history of the Spanish language; Spanish
in the Americas.

581. Topics in Secondary Language Linguistics Theories and
Applications (3) [Rpt./2 when topics varies] Various topics, such
as theories and techniques of teaching Spanish, theories of
second language acquisition, applied linguistics, theories of
second language evaluation.

582. Topics in Hispanic Linguistic Theories and Applications (3)
[Rpt./2 when topic varies] Various topics such as Hispanic
sociolinguistics, theoretical issues in Spanish phonology,
Spanish semantics, linguistic perspective on Mexican-American
Spanish.

587. Testing and Evaluation in Foreign/Second Language Programs
(3) (Identical with GER 587)

696. Seminar
a. Spanish Peninsular Literature (3) [Rpt./3]
b. Spanish American Literature (3) [Rpt./3]
c. Mexican and Mexican American Literature (3) [Rpt./3]
d. Hispanic Linguistics (3) [Rpt./3]

Portuguese (PORT)

101. First Semester Portuguese (4) GRD Oral approach. Portuguese
for students with no previous experience with the language.

102. Second Semester Portuguese (4) GRD Oral approach. P, 101.

205. Intensive Portuguese (4) 205 is the equivalent of 101 and
102. Recommended for highly motivated students and/or those with
experience in another Romance Language.

206. Intensive Portuguese (4) Recommended for highly motivated
students or those with experience in another Romance language. P,
102, 205.

325. Intermediate Grammar, Conversation and Writing Skills (3) I
For intermediate students to enhance their writing, speaking and
reading abilities and to prepare for the transition from language
learning to studies in literature as well as in culture and
civilization of the Lusophone world. P, 206. (Identical with LA S
325)

397. Workshop
r. Portuguese Language Skills and Culture (4) S Offered only in
Rio de Janeiro. P, four semesters of Portuguese.

401. Lusophone Literature to 1900 (3) Overview of literary
periods and introduction to the major literary figures of
Portugal, Brazil, and the Lusophone African countries (Angola,
Mozambique, Cape Verde, Guine-Bissau, and Porto Principe) from
the beginning of their literature to the present. P, 325.

406. Lusophone Literature Since 1900 (3) II Survey of literature
written in Portuguese worldwide since 1900. Language of
instruction is Portuguese. P, 350 (Identical with LAS 406) May be
convened with 506.

414. Teaching of Modern Languages (3) II (Identical with TTE 414)

422. Introduction to Romance Philology (3) I (Identical with SPAN
422)

425. Advanced Grammar, Composition and Writing Skills (3) I II
For more advanced students to increase comprehension of written
Portuguese, to improve oral skills, to practice written skills,
and to prepare for transition from language learning to the study
of literature. P, 325.

430. Brazilian Civilization (3) I 1993-94 A broad survey of
Brazilian culture. Thematic examination of some of the major
cultural developments. Topics include: Brazilian popular music,
Afro-Brazilian culture, the role of women in Brazilian society,
Brazilian popular culture. P, 325. (Identical with LA S 430) May
be convened with 530.

431. Civilization in the Lusophone World (3) II Culture and
civilization in the Lusophone world (Portuguese, Lusophone
Africa, Brazil) in a comparative mode. Portuguese is the language
of instruction. P, 325. (Identical with LAS 431) May be convened
with 531.

448. Brazilian Literature in Film (3) I Presentation of the
masterpieces of Brazilian literature and the great films based on
that literature. Language of instruction is Portuguese. P, 350.
May be convened with 548.

449. Brazilian Literature in Film (3) I 1994-95 The masterpieces
of Brazilian literature and the great films based upon them. P,
325. (Identical with LA S 449) May be convened with 549.

501. Lusophone Literature to 1900 (3) For a description of course
topics, see 401. Graduate-level requirements include a 12-15 page
final paper and an oral report. May be convened with 401.

506. Lusophone Literature Since 1900 (3) II Survey of literature
written in Portuguese worldwide since 1900. Language of
instruction is Portuguese. P, 350 (Identical with LAS 506) May be
convened with 406.

530. Brazilian Civilization (3) I 1993-94 For a description of
course topics, see 430. Graduate students required to write four
research papers and give one lecture on a topic of his/her
choice. May be convened with 430.

531. Civilization in the Lusophone World (3) II For a description
of course topics, see 431. Graduate-level requirements include a
twenty-one page final paper and an oral presentation on their
paper (Identical with LAS 531) May be convened with 431.

548. Brazilian Literature in Film (3) I For a description of
course topics, see 448. Graduate students will be required to
write a 12-15 page research paper, to prepare a class
presentation on a topic of their choice, and to read one extra
novel/play/film. May be convened with 448.

549. Brazilian Literature in Film (3) I 1994-95 For a description
of course topics, see 449. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research paper. P, 325. (Identical with LA S 549) May be
convened with 449.

563. Studies in Brazilian Literature (3) I 1993-94 Major works,
authors and tendencies in modern Brazilian literature. P, 325.
(Identical with LAS 563)

564. Studies in Portuguese Literature (3) II Major works, authors
and tendencies in modern Brazilian literature. P, 325.

596. Seminar
m. Mexican-American Heritage Bibliography - A Library Seminar (3)
[Rpt./6 units] I (Identical with MAS 596m, which is home)

 


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