The University of Arizona  1993-95 General Catalog

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Special Education and Rehabilitation (SER)
Education Building, Room 412
(520) 621-7822

Professors Amos P. Sales, Acting Head, Candace S. Bos, William C.
Healey, Sidney W. Bijou, James C. Chalfant, Bob G. Johnson
(Emeritus), Jeanne McRae McCarthy, Inez Tucker (Emerita)

Associate Professors Shirin D. Antia, Daniel Head, C. June Maker,
S. Mae Smith, John Umbreit

Assistant Professors Nancy Eldredge, James Organist, Samuel
Supalla

The department is committed to scholarship and leadership in the
development of theory and practice related to the empowerment of
individuals with disabilities and special abilities. The
department's research, teaching, and service addresses current
issues in special education, rehabilitation, and sign language
studies. The department offers professional preparation of
special teachers and specialists, teachers of the gifted and
talented, rehabilitation counselors and psychologists, and
administrators, researchers, and teacher educators.

The department offers programs of study leading to the Bachelor
of Science in Education with a major in special education and
rehabilitation. Prospective students should consult the Office of
Student Services within the College of Education for more
specific information. At the time of catalog production, the
Bachelor of Science in Education was under review. Non-teaching
minors in special education and rehabilitation are offered at the
baccalaureate level. The department participates in the honors
program.

The department also offers programs leading to the Master of
Arts, Educational Specialist, Doctor of Education, and Doctor of
Philosophy degrees with a major in special education and
rehabilitation. For graduate admission and degree requirements,
consult the Graduate Catalog.

301a-301b. Mainstreaming (2-2) GRD Introduction to the
integration of special students into the regular elementary
(301a) and secondary (301b) classrooms. 301a is open to
elementary education majors currently enrolled in student
teaching. 301b is open to secondary education majors currently
enrolled in student teaching. P, TTE 322, 323, 324, 326, 327. 

370a-370b. American Sign Language (4-4) I II Designed for
students with no previous knowledge of ASL and/or deaf culture.
To develop basic skills in ASL vocabulary, grammar and use. Must
be taken in sequence.

400. Foundations of Special Education and Rehabilitation (3) I II
General characteristics of exceptional/disabled persons in
interrelated human service delivery systems. May be convened with
500.

401a. Assessment and Instruction for Students with Learning
Problems (3) I II Procedures, methods, strategies for informal
diagnosis and remediation of students with learning problems in
the areas of reading, spelling, handwriting, written expression,
mathematics amd socialization. Strategies and adaptations
appropriate for use in the regular elementary or the special
classroom. May be convened with 501a.

401b. Assessment and Instruction for Preschool Children with
Learning Problems (3) I II Procedures, methods, strategies for
assessment and instruction of children with learning problems in
the preschool years. Strategies and adaptations for use with
delay sin physical development, cognitive development,
communication development, socio-emotional development, and the
development of adaptive behavior will be emphasized. P, 400, 460,
575. Open to students in dual certification program in TTE.

402. Behavior Principles for the Handicapped (3) I II Use of
behavior principles to modify the behavior of handicapped
persons, especially moderately and severely handicapped. 3R, 1L.
P, 400. May be convened with 502.

403. The Special Services in the Schools (3) I II S Information
to aid teachers in dealing with responsibilities and concerns in
school settings with regard to P.L. 94-142. Education for All
Handicapped Children Act Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act,
Family Education Rights and Privacy Act, and other legal issues.
May be convened with 503.

404. Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in Exceptional Learners
(3) I Provides a theoretical base and practical approach to the
study of special needs of students with language and cultural
differences; basic premises of bilingual special education and
the interface of the two fields. May be convened with 504.

405. Introduction to Learning Disabilities (3) I II Theories and
history of programs for individuals with learning disabilities--
definition, characteristics, etiology. Degree candidates must
complete 400 prior to taking 405. May be convened with 505.

410. Introduction to Mental Retardation and Severe Disabilities
(3) I History and philosophy of educational programs for persons
with mental retardation and other developmental disabilities;
etiology, classification, and characteristics, with consideration
of educational, social, and psychological problems. P, 400 or CR.
May be convened with 510.

411. Service Delivery Trends in Rehabilitation and Special
Education (3) I II Critical examination of current trends, issues
and initiatives affecting service systems for persons with
disabilities.

415. Physical and Multiple Disabilities (3) [Rpt./1] I Physical
and multiple impairments, etiology, intervention practices,
adaptations, transferring and handling skills, and integration
into typical environments. Field trips. May be convened with 515.

421. Introduction to Visual Impairments and Deaf-Blindness (3) I
An overview of educational services for the student with visual
impairments and multiple sensory impairments. An emphasis is
placed on the psychosocial effects of visual impairments on the
individual and means of compensating for those effects. May be
convened with 521.

423a-423b. Tactile Communication (3-3) 423a: Fundamentals of
Braille reading and writing, methods of teaching Braille and
preparation of materials. 423b: Beginning abacus, Nemeth Code,
computer Braille, preparation of materials for instructional use.
May be convened with 523a-523b.

425. Strategies of Vocational Development and Supported
Employment (3) II Systematic study of the strategies used to
place and retain individuals with disabilities in paid, community
employment. Topics to include job development, consumer
assessment, job placement, job-site training, and follow-up. P,
400. May be convened with 525.

430. Education and Rehabilitation of Deaf and Hard of Hearing
Individuals (3) I Current and historical perspectives;
educational and rehabilitative services; etiology; impact on
families, psychosocial, cognitive and intellectual development
and functioning of deaf and hard of hearing individuals. May be
convened with 530.

431a-431b. American Sign Language (4-4) I II Designed to develop
intermediate ASL conversational skills in a variety of settings,
topics, and functions. P, 370b or department permission. May be
convened with 531a-531b. Must be taken in sequence.

433a-433b-433c-433d. Special Topics in Deaf Studies (3-3-3-3) I
II 433a: Introduction to the structure of ASL; 433b: Languages
and cultures of deaf communities; 433c: History of the deaf
community; 433d: ASL literature and film. Classes will be offered
on a rotating basis in a-b-c-d sequence; however, courses need
not be taken in sequence. P, 431b or permission of department.
May be convened with 533a-533b-533c-533d.

439a-439b-439c. Special Topics in Sign Language Studies (3-3-3) I
II Classes will be offered on a rotating basis in the following
sequence--439a: ASL Acquisition and Bilingualism; 439b: Signed
Language Policy, Planning, and Intervention; 439c: Methods and
Materials of ASL/ESL Instruction. Courses need not be taken in
sequence. P, 431b or permission of department. May be convened
with 539a-539b-539c.

440. Education of Gifted Children (3) I Issues in education of
the gifted; discussion of definitions, characteristics,
development, screening, identification, curriculum, teaching
strategies, and program development. P, 400. May be convened with
540.

444a-444b-444c. ASL Discourse Processes (3 to 6 - 3 to 6 - 3 to
6) S 444a: Intensive ASL. 444b: Introduction to Interpreting.
444c: Classroom instruction in ASL. Courses need not be taken in
sequence. P, 431b or permission of division. May be convened with
544a-544b-544c.

450. Introduction to Emotional or Behavioral Disorders (3) I
Issues in education of the emotionally or behaviorally
disordered; discussion of history, current issues, definitions,
characteristics, and theoretical perspectives. P, 400. May be
convened with 550.

455. Rehabilitation of the Aged (3) II Emphasis on aging from the
viewpoint of the aging person and those working with the aged.
May be convened with 555.

460. Introduction to Early Childhood Special Education (3) I
Focuses on the disabling conditions impacting on infants,
toddlers and their families, preschool children, programs
available to serve them and their families, and critical issues
in this rapidly evolving field. P, 400. May be convened with 560.

468. Transition Methods (3) II Provides an understanding of
effective strategies for promoting the smooth transition of
students with disabilities from school to work and adult living.
May be convened with 568.

475. Observation and Participation in Special Education Programs
(1-3) [Rpt./6 units] I II Observation and participation at sites
serving exceptional individuals. Participation in seminars. P,
400/500.

478. Prevention of Addictions (3) I Analysis of addictive
behaviors (e.g., drug addictions, eating disorders, compulsive
gambling) from a psychosocial and biological perspective and the
implications of this analysis for primary, secondary, and
tertiary prevention of addictions. May be convened with 578.

481. Interviewing and Client Services (3) I II The development of
essential interviewing skills for case management of
rehabilitation clients. P, 400, 411a-411b, 425/525.

483. Supervised Casework in Rehabilitation (3) I II Application
of fundamental professional rehabilitation theories and skills in
field settings. P, 400, 411b; 481 or CR.

484. Problems of Drug Abuse (3) [Rpt./1] I II Survey course for
teachers, counselors, and agency workers concerned with drug
abuse; examination of community, cultural, and educational
approaches to drug use and abuse. May be convened with 584.

485. Rehabilitating the Public Offender (3) I II Components in
service delivery to the public offender, how the offender enters
the criminal justice system, and treatment and rehabilitation
services available.

494. Practicum
a. Teaching Exceptional Children (1-10) I II P, 400, field work,
student teaching in area of emphasis.

495. Colloquium
a. Substance Abuse Education (1) II May be convened with 595a.

500. Foundations of Special Education and Rehabilitation (3) I II
For a description of course topics, see 400. Graduate-level
requirements include in-depth paper(s) on aspects of current
issues in the field. May be convened with 400.

501a. Assessment and Instruction for Students with Learning
Problems (3) I II For a description of course topics, see 401a.
Graduate-level requirements include in-depth projects. May be
convened with 401a.

501b. Assessment and Instruction for Preschool Children with
Learning Problems (3) I II For a description of course topics,
see 401b. Graduate-level requirements include in-depth paper(s)
on aspects of current issues in the field. May be convened with
401b.

502. Behavior Principles for the Handicapped (3) I II For a
description of course topics, see 402. Graduate-level
requirements include in-depth paper(s) on aspects of current
issues in the field. May be convened with 402.

503. The Special Services in the Schools (3) I II S For a
description of course topics, see 403. Graduate-level
requirements include in-depth paper(s) on aspects of current
issues in the field. May be convened with 403.

504. Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in Exceptional Learners
(3) I For a description of course topics, see 404. Graduate-level
requirements include in-depth paper(s) on aspects of current
issues in the field. May be convened with 404.

505. Introduction to Learning Disabilities (3) I II For a
description of course topics, see 405. Graduate-level
requirements include in-depth paper(s) on aspects of current
issues in the field. May be convened with 405.

506. Issues in Learning Disabilities (3) II Current issues in
learning disabilities, including the learning-disabled student in
secondary school, early identification, career education. P,
405/505.

507a-507b. Methods for Diagnosing Specific Learning Disabilities
(3-3) I Educational and psychological assessment of academic
areas and learning processes involving perception, integration,
and expression, with emphasis on informal and formal assessment
and diagnostic teaching. P, CR, 405/505 or department permission;
CR, 593.

508. Teaching Elementary Students with Learning Disabilities (3)
II Remediation of academic areas and cognitive processes
involving perception, integration, and expression, with emphasis
on strategies for planning and implementing instructional
programs at the elementary level. P, 405/505, 507a-507b and
permission of department; CR, 593, 594.

510. Introduction to Mental Retardation and Severe Disabilities
(3) I For a description of course topics, see 410. Graduate-level
requirements include in-depth paper(s) on aspects of current
issues in the field. May be convened with 410.

512. Teaching Learning Disabled Adolescents (3) I Intervention
alternatives for teaching the learning disabled adolescent at the
secondary level. Emphasis on current intervention methods and
practices. P, 400/500.

513. Educating Students with Mental Retardation and Severe
Disabilities (3) II Methods of developing age-appropriate and
functional programming, integration, community-based instruction,
and integrative source delivery for students who have moderate to
profound retardation and other physical, sensory and behavior
disorders.

515. Physical and Multiple Disabilities (3) [Rpt./1] I For a
description of course topics, see 415. Graduate-level
requirements include additional assignments. Field trips. May be
convened with 415.

518. Nonoral Communication (3) [Rpt./3] II Techniques for
assessment and intervention of alternative communication skills
other than speech for students with severe disabilities.
Nonsymbolic communication skills development for all ages; social
interaction skills; augmentative communication aids.

520. Low Vision and Visual Functioning (3) I Anatomy and
physiology of the eye; implications of visual disorders including
visual field losses; introduction to optics; use of optical and
nonoptical aids in classroom settings; clinical and functional
low vision assessments, including assessing children with
multiple impairments; and report writing. P, 521.

521. Introduction to Visual Impairments and Deaf-Blindness (3) I
For a description of course topics, see 421. Graduate-level
requirements include writing a grant proposal to obtain monies to
enhance service delivery. May be convened with 421.

522a. Orientation and Mobility for Teachers of Individuals with
Visual Impairments I (3) II Methods of teaching orientation and
mobility skills to visually impaired and blind students. Emphasis
on the school-aged child, with particular attention to concept
development, orientation skills, pre-cane skills, personal
safety, and independent ambulation, including an introduction to
long-cane techniques.

523a-523b. Tactile Communication (3-3) For a description of
course topics, see 423a-423b. Graduate-level requirements include
in-depth paper(s) on aspects of current issues and class
presentations. May be convened with 423a-423b.

524. Methods of Teaching the Visually Handicapped (3) II
Curriculum development and adaptation in various educational
programs; adaptation of classroom materials and procedures for
use with blind and partially sighted children and youth; emphasis
on methods of teaching academic and nonacademic skills and on
educating students with nonhandicapped peers. P, 521; CR, 593.

525. Strategies of Vocational Development and Supported
Employment (3) II For a description of course topics, see 425.
Graduate-level requirements include in-depth paper(s) on aspects
of current issues in the field. P, 400/500. May be convened with
425.

526. Principles and Assessment of O & M (3) I In-depth study of
the principles supporting orientation and mobility instruction;
assessment principles and strategies specific to O & M. P, 522a,
520 or equivalent from other universities.

527. Advanced O & M Practice and Procedures (3) I Prepares
orientation and mobility (O & M) specialists in methods,
techniques and approaches using the long cane and other mobility
devices essential in the development of travel skills of persons
with visual impairments. 2R, 8L. P, 522a, 520 or equivalent from
other universities.

530. Education and Rehabilitation of Deaf and Hard of Hearing
Individuals (3) I For a description of course topics, see 430.
Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth paper and a class
presentation. May be convened with 430.

531a-531b. American Sign Language (4-4) I II For a description of
course topics, see 431a-431b. Graduate-level requirements include
a research paper and an oral presentation on an approved aspect
of the linguistics of American Sign Language. May be convened
with 431a-431b. Must be taken in sequence.

532. Oral/Aural Development and Assessment: Deaf and Hard of
Hearing (3) II Development of speech and speech reception skills;
assessment of speech intelligibility, articulation, speech
reading and auditory functioning of deaf and hard of hearing
children. P, 430/530, SP H 583.

533a-533b-533c-533d. Special Topics in Deaf Studies (3-3-3-3) I
II For a description of course topics, see 433a-433b-433c-433d.
Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on
a course-related topic and a class presentation. Classes will be
offered on a rotating basis in a-b-c-d sequence; however, courses
need not be taken in sequence. P, 531b or permission of
department. May be convened with 433a-433b-433c-433d.

534. Language Development for the Exceptional Child (3) I
Pragmatic, semantic and syntactic aspects of pre-linguistic and
linguistic development in exceptional children and youth;
cognitive and social bases of language development.

535. Assessment of Bilingual Exceptional Learners (2) II
Educational and psychological assessment of bilingual students
with emphasis on informal and formal evaluation methods and
procedures for purposes of identification and educational
planning. P, 507.

536. Teaching Bilingual Exceptional Learners (2) II Instructional
interventions and program development for exceptional students
from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Emphasis
on current intervention methods and practices. P, 508.

537. Language and Reading Intervention for Deaf and Hard of
Hearing Children (3) II Receptive and expressive language
assessment techniques of language and reading intervention and
remediation for deaf and hard of hearing children and youth. P,
534; CR, 594b.

538. Methods for Oral/Aural Communication Development: Deaf and
Hard of Hearing (3) I Methods for teaching auditory and
oral/aural communication skills to deaf and hard of hearing
children and adolescents. P, 532; CR, 594b.

539a-539b-539c. Special Topics in Sign Language Studies (3-3-3) I
II For a description of course topics, see 439a-439b-439c.
Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on
a course-related topic and a class presentation. P, 531b or
permission of department. May be convened with 439a-439b-439c.

540. Education of Gifted Children (3) I For a description of
course topics, see 440. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth paper(s) on a single aspect of current issues in the
field. May be convened with 440.

541. Teaching the Gifted: Questioning Strategies (3) II Mastery
of skills involved in developing abstract thinking abilities in
gifted children by using the Hilda Taba Teaching Strategies.
Emphasis on using these sequential questioning methods in all
content areas and at all grade levels. P, 440/540.

542. Teaching the Gifted: Productive Thinking Models (3) I
Mastery of skills involved in developing productive thinking
abilities in gifted children by using teaching-learning models
developed by Parnes, Williams, Taylor, Guilford, Renzulli and
Treffinger at all grade levels and in all-content areas. P,
440/540.

543. Teaching the Gifted: Hierarchical Models (3) I 1990-91
Introduction to general principles involved in providing a
curriculum for the gifted. Overview of ten teaching-learning
models commonly used with the gifted. Mastery of skills involved
in using the hierarchical models with gifted students. P,
440/540.

544a-544b-544c. ASL Discourse Processes (3 to 6- 3 to 6 -3 to 6)
S For a description of course topics, see 444a-444b-444c.
Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth paper on aspects
of current issues in the field. P, 531b or permission of
department. May be convened with 444a-444b-444c. 

550. Introduction to Emotional or Behavioral Disorders (3) I For
a description of course topics, see 450. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth paper(s) on a single aspect of
current issues in the field. May be convened with 450.

551. Teaching Children with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders (3)
II Assessment techniques, academic and behavioral intervention
strategies, and classroom management with emotionally or
behaviorally disordered children and youth.

555. Rehabilitation of the Aged (3) II For a description of
course topics, see 455. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research paper and a class presentation on a topic
related to course content. May be convened with 455.

560. Introduction to Early Childhood Special Education (3) I For
a description of course topics, see 460. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth paper(s) on a single aspect of
current issues in the field. May be convened with 460.

561. Methods of Teaching Preschool Children with Disabilities (3)
II Deals with competencies required to teach all categories of
disabilities found in preschool children except deaf/blind. Field
trips. P, 460, 560, 562, 575, CR 593.

562. Methods of Assessment for Preschool Children with
Disabilities (3) I Norm-referenced and criterion-referenced
instruments for screening, diagnosis and assessment of infants,
toddlers, and preschool children will be reviewed. Emphasis will
be placed on teacher involvement in the assessment process. P,
400/500.

563. Client Assessment in Rehabilitation (3) II Exploration of
the world of work; critical review of vocational choice theories;
experiences in the use and interpretation of individual
assessment techniques. P, 565 or CR; ED P 458.

565. Principles of Rehabilitation (3) I Principles underlying
rehabilitation programs and interdisciplinary relationships of
agencies engaged in rehabilitation services.

568. Transition Methods (3) II For a description of course
topics, see 468. Graduate-level requirements include additional
assignments including a term paper. May be convened with 468.

570. Administration of Special Education Programs (3) II
Practical aspects of organization and development of special
education programs, including philosophy, issue resolution,
public relations, personnel, case finding, evaluation, placement,
and records systems. P, consult director before enrolling.

571. Supervision of Special Education (3) I Practical aspects of
supervising special education programs and services; curriculum
development, service delivery models, staff development, program
development, and legal issues and requirements.

572. Policy and Program Evaluation Analysis in Special Education
(3) I Practical aspects of policy analysis and program
development/evaluation in schools and other social agencies that
serve with disabilities and/or giftedness.

575. Observation and Participation in Special Education Programs
(1-3) [Rpt./6 units] I II For course topics, see 475. P, 400/500.

578. Prevention of Addictions (3) I For a description of course
topics, see 478. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth
research paper or other project. May be convened with 478.

580. Medical Aspects of Disability (3) I Etiology, therapy, and
prognosis of the major disabilities, including drug and alcohol;
assessment of physical capacities and limitations; typical
restorative techniques.

581. Psychosocial Aspects of Disability (3) I Exploration of the
psychological and sociological aspects of disability; analysis of
somatopsychology, psychosomatics, and social psychology.

582. Principles and Practices of Vocational Evaluation (3) I
Understanding work skills and labor market conditions; process of
vocational evaluation of rehabilitation clientele; collecting and
synthesizing evaluation data and writing meaningful reports.

583. Counseling Practices in Rehabilitation Setting (3) I
Facilitation training of rehabilitation professionals in their
implementation of counseling practices with varied ethnic, age
disability, and dependency populations. 3R, 1L. Open to majors
only.

584. Problems of Drug Abuse (3) II For a description of course
topics, see 484. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth
research paper and a class presentation on a topic related to
course content. May be convened with 484.

585. Vocational Planning and Placement (3) II Problems of
physical, mental, social, and emotional disability, as they
relate to the formulation of a rehabilitation plan; exploration
of the various sources of occupational and career choice
information, job placement and development. P, 565, 580, 563 or
CR.

586. Psychosocial Assessment of the Deaf Person (3) II Selection,
administration, and interpretation of various psychosocial
evaluation instruments used with deaf persons. P, ED P 673, 674a.

587. Construction and Development of Assessment Samples (3) II
Use of occupational information, career exploration and job
analysis techniques; development, construction, standardization,
and use of work samples and related vocational assessment
techniques. P, 565, 582, 563.

588. Professional Problems and Ethical Concerns in Rehabilitation
Psychology (3) I Introduction to the field of rehabilitation
psychology including an examination of ethical and legal
considerations in the practice of rehabilitative psychology,
foundational material in professional psychology, and an overview
of the rules and functions of rehabilitation psychology.

589. Counseling and Case Practices with the Deaf (3) II
Principles, methods, and techniques of counseling and case
practices with deaf people in rehabilitation settings. P, 583.

590. Applied Research with Exceptional Learners (3) II Review of
principles and practices underlying applied research with
exceptional learners; practice in preparation of research
proposals; conduct of research emphasized.

593. Internship (1-12) I II  Special sections in each
concentration to be arranged in the department office.

594. Practicum
a. Communication Development for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
Children (1-6) I II
c. Teaching the Gifted (1-6) [Rpt./9 units] I II S CR, 440, 541,
542, 543.

595. Colloquium
a. Substance Abuse Education (1) II May be convened with 495a.
b. Language Learning and Reading Disabilities (3) II (Identical
with LRC 595b)
c. Mental Retardation and Severe Disabilities (3) II P, 400.
d. Recent Advances in Special Education and Rehabilitation (3-6)
I II
e. Bilingual Special Education (2) I
f. Emotional or Behavioral Disorders (3) I Open to majors only.
g. Orientation and Mobility (3) II P, 520, 522a, 522b, 526.
k. Group Processes (3) I II

597. Workshop
a. Creativity and Giftedness (3) [Rpt./9 units]
d. Woodcock-Johnson - Revised (1) GRD S Open to majors only.
e. Consultation and Collaboration for Special Needs Students (2)
II
l. Attention Deficit Disorders (1) S
m. Counseling Mexican Americans (3) I S

695. Colloquium
a. Issues, Trends, and Futures in Special Education: Doctoral
Think Tank (3) II
b. Emotional or Behavioral Disorders (3) II
c. Rehabilitation Psychology (3) [Rpt./9 units] I II
d. Learning Disabilities (3) I
f. Sensory Impaired (3) II
g. Issues and Research in Educating the Gifted (3) [Rpt./9 units]
II
h. Rehabilitation Administration (3) II
j. Rehabilitation of the Deaf (3) II
l. Diagnosis in Rehabilitation Psychology (3) II

 


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