The University of Arizona  1993-95 General Catalog

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Psychology (PSYC)
Psychology Building, Room 312
(520) 621-7439

Professors Lynn Nadel, Head, Carol Barnes, Neil R. Bartlett
(Emeritus), Lee Roy Beach (Management and Policy), Robert B.
Bechtel, Judith Becker (Psychiatry), Allan Beigel (Psychiatry),
Richard Bootzin, Dipankar Chakravarti (Marketing), William D.
Crano (Communication), Terry C. Daniel, George Domino, Kenneth
Forster (Cognitive Science), Merrill Garrett (Cognitive Science),
Michael Gottfredson (Management and Policy), Barbara Gutek
(Management and Policy), Travis Hirschi (Sociology), Sigmund
Hsiao, William H. Ittelson, Marvin W. Kahn, Alfred Kaszniak, John
F. Kihlstrom, James E. King, Mary P. Koss (Family and Community
Medicine), Robert W. Lansing, Bruce McNaughton, Amnon Rapoport
(Management and Policy), Carl A. Ridley (Family and Consumer
Resources), David Rowe (Family and Consumer Resources), Bruce D.
Sales, Jose Santiago (Psychiatry), Gary Schwartz, Lee Sechrest,
Mary C. Wetzel, David B. Wexler (Law), Robert L. Wrenn

Associate Professors Harold S. Arkowitz, Merrie L. Brucks
(Marketing), Robert Burns (Management and Policy), Jeff
Greenberg, Irene M. Pepperberg (Ecology and Evolutionary
Biology), Mary Peterson, Ronald H. Pool, Christopher Puto
(Marketing), Rosemary A. Rosser, Catherine Shisslak (Family and
Community Medicine), Varda Shoham, Linda Swisher (Speech and
Hearing Sciences), Gary Wenk

Assistant Professors Geoffrey Ahern (Neurology), John Allen,
Felice Bedford, Iris Bell (Psychiatry), Paul Bloom, Aurelio J.
Figueredo, Daniel J. Flannery (Family and Consumer Resources),
Elizabeth Glisky, Kerry Green, Elizabeth Krupinski (Radiology),
Mark Lane (Psychiatry), Akiva Liberman, Chad Marsolek, Laura
McCloskey, Mark Mennemeier (Psychiatry, Neurology), Janet Nicol
(Linguistics), Tamra Pearson-d'Estree, Cyma Van Petten, Karen
Wynn

The Department of Psychology offers courses designed to provide a
scientific understanding of cognition, emotion, and motivation,
the biological basis of mental life and behavior in the nervous
and endocrine systems, the organization and development of mind
and behavior in the individual, the social basis of mental life
and behavior, and the nature and treatment of psychopathology.

Degrees awarded are the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science,
Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy with a major in
psychology. The master's degree is awarded during doctoral
training; there is no Master of Arts program as such.

All psychology majors must satisfy departmental distribution
requirements by completing one course (3 units) in each of the
following areas: cognition, emotion and motivation (CEM);
psychobiology and neuroscience (PN); and individual and social
processes (ISP). CEM courses include 218, 313, 318, 329, 350,
355, 356, 370, 415, 419, 425, 429, 449, 451, 453, 455, 472, 473,
479, and 488. PN courses are 302, 312, 370, 401, 403, 411, 412,
413, 419, 437, 465, 467, and 478. Courses in the ISP area include
216, 300, 314, 316, 371, 385, 410, 414, 416, 421, 422, 427, 430,
431, 435, 437, 446, 449, 450, 454, 458, 462, 466, 478, and 484.

The major for the B.A.: 36 units of psychology, of which at least
18 units must be in upper-division course work. Majors must take
101, 230, and 290. The remaining 27 units must include at least
one Writing-Emphasis Course numbered over 400, and may include up
to 3 units in 94 series of practicum or 99 series of independent
study.

Students intending to major in psychology are encouraged to
complete 101 in their freshman year, and 230 and 290 by the end
of their sophomore year. In general, 101 is a prerequisite for
courses numbered above 200, and 230 and 290 are prerequisites for
courses numbered above 400; courses numbered 200-399 lay the
foundations for courses numbered 400-499, and should be completed
by the end of the junior year.

The major for the B.S.: 36 units of psychology, distributed as
required for the B.A. In addition, 8 units in a biological
laboratory science; 8 units in chemistry or 8 units in physics
with laboratory; and 6 units of mathematics, including MATH
117R/S and either MATH 119 or 123.

The minor for the B.A. and B.S.: 20 units of psychology, of which
at least 9 units must be in upper-division course work. Minors
must take 101, 230 and 290., and at least one course in each of
the three distribution areas (CEM, PN, and ISP). Alternatively,
as described elsewhere in the General Catalog, minors with 101,
230, and 290 may develop a thematic minor around some particular
topic in psychology.

Students planning to attend graduate school in psychology should
complete 102, 291, 405, and 475, and should consult with an
advisor no later than their sophomore year.

Recommended minors are biological, physical, or social sciences,
philosophy, linguistics, mathematics, or computer science.

The department participates in the Honors program. The Honors
program is designed for psychology majors who intend to continue
into psychology as a career, and will use the Honors program to
enhance their preparation and entrance into graduate and
professional study. Courses 101, 102, 230, 290, 291, 296, 396.
Independent study courses 199-499, Preceptorship 491, and Senior
Project 498 are available for Honors credit.

101. Introduction to Psychology (3) I II S Survey of psychology
including history, systems, and methods; structure and functions
of the nervous and endocrine systems; learning; motivation and
emotion; sensation and perception; memory; thought and language;
personality; development; social interaction; psychopathology and
psychotherapy. Required for admission to all other Psychology
courses. CR, 102 recommended.

102. Topics in Psychology (1) I II S Optional discussion course
designed to complement the lectures and readings in 101.
Laboratory demonstrations. Library research leading to modest
writing assignment. Strongly recommended for prospective majors
and students in the Honors Program. CR, 101.

196. Proseminar
a. When Bad Things Happen to Healthy People (1) I II
b. The Psychology of Death in Our Life (1) I II Credit is allowed
for this course or other freshman seminar.

210. Brain and Behavior (3) I Current concepts, research
strategies and findings in the brain sciences, emphasizing their
application to behavior and social sciences. Open to freshmen and
sophomores. Credit is allowed for this course or 302, but not
both. P, 101.

216. Psychology of Gender (3) II Analysis of gender differences
and their source in biology and culture. P, 101. (Identical with
W S 216)

218. Health Psychology (3) I II S The relationship of health to
mental and behavioral processes. Illness and medical treatment
from standpoint of psychology. P, 101.

230. Psychological Measurement and Statistics (3) I II S
Measurement, quantitative description, and statistical inference
as applied to psychological variables. P, MATH 116R/S; PSYC 101
or CR.

240. Human Development (3) I Development across the life span.
Topics include social, emotional, and intellectual growth. Open
to freshmen and sophomores. P, 101.

290. Research Methods (3) I II S Students will gain experience in
a range of psychological research methods. 2R, 3L. P, 101, 230.

296. Proseminar
H. Psychology Honors (3) II P, acceptance into honors program.

297. Proseminar
a. Introductory Workshop in Experimental Psychology (2) I II S.
P, 101, 230, 290 or CR 290.

300. Social Psychology (3) I II S Introduction to major theories
and research findings of social psychology; to provide an
understanding of the roles of cognitive and motivational
processes in social behavior. P, 101 or 8 units of biological
laboratory science.

302. Introduction to Biopsychology (3) I II S Survey of the basic
principles of nervous system function in relation to perception,
learning, memory, emotion, and thinking. Credit is allowed for
this course or for 210, but not for both. P, 290, or 8 units of
biology lab science.

312. Primate Behavior (3) I II Survey of psychological research
on nonhuman primates; includes sensory processes, learning,
development, social and abnormal behaviors. P, 290.

313. Introduction to Cognitive Development (3) I II Introduction
to the development of cognition, intelligence and language from
conception to adolescence. P, 101.

314. Introduction to Personality and Social Development (3) I II
Introduction to the development of personality, emotion, and
social cognition and behavior from conception to adolescence. P,
101.

316. Personality (3) I II Basic concepts and issues in
personality theory and research; approaches to personality
description and assessment. P, 101.

318. Language Development (3) I Introduction to theory and
research on language development, with emphasis on word learning
and grammatical development. P, 101 or LING 101 or consult
department before enrolling. (Identical with LING 318)

329. Sensation and Perception (3) I II How people receive
environmental information, and what they do with it. P, 101; 230
and 290.

350. Minds, Brains and Computers (3) [Rpt.] I (Identical with
PHIL 350)

355. Cognitive Psychology (3) I II S Introduction to the
experimental analysis of the information processing systems
underlying human cognition, language and memory. P, 101.

356. Brain and Cognition (3) Introduction to the field of
cognitive neuroscience: the study of brain mechanisms of
attention, memory and language. P, 302.

358. Psychology of Consciousness (3) II Introduction to theory
and research on both normal and altered states of consciousness,
from a natural science and cognitive psychology viewpoint. Topics
reviewed include philosophical foundations, brain systems and
consciousness, introspection, sleep and dreaming, hypnosis,
meditation, and psychedelic drugs. P, 101, 230, 290.

370. Mechanisms of Learning (3) I Review of learning processes
and related research methods and findings. P, 101; 230 and 290.

371. Environmental Psychology (3) I Basic concepts in
environmental psychology; the relationship between the individual
and the large-scale environment. P, 290.

385. Industrial-Organizational Psychology (3) I II S The
application of psychology to problems of industrial
organizations, including personnel, job satisfaction, leadership,
and advertising. P, 290.

401. Biological Bases of Motivation (3) I Biochemical compounds
related to life and the role of behavior in life; chemical
processes occurring within organisms and how they interact with
behavior. P, 101; 230 and 290; 302 or 8 units of biological
laboratory science. May be convened with 501.

403. Laboratory in Mammalian Systems Neurophysiology (3) I II
Neurophysiology laboratory including stereotaxic surgery,
microelectrode recording of neural signals, electrical and
chemical stimulation, and principles of analog and digital signal
processing. P, 290, 302. (Identical with NRSC 403) Open only to
psychology majors and IDS majors with a psychology subject area.
May be convened with 503. Writing-Emphasis Course*

405. Advanced Statistical Methods in Psychology (3) II Rationale
and methods of statistical inference; sampling distributions,
analysis of variance, statistical models; comparisons,
correlation and regression. P, 290.

410. Advanced Social Psychology (3) I II Social psychology, with
emphasis on theory and method. P, 290. Open only to psychology
majors and IDS majors with a psychology subject area. May be
convened with 510. Writing-Emphasis Course*

411. Animal Behavior (3) I Systematic study of animal behavior.
Analysis of environmental and genetic determinants of behavior,
special behavioral adaptations in animals, and sociobiological
concepts. P, 290. Open only to psychology majors and IDS majors
with a psychology subject area. May be convened with 511.
Writing-Emphasis Course*

412. Animal Learning (3) II Animal learning with emphasis on
interspecies comparisons. P, 290. Open only to psychology majors
and IDS majors with a psychology subject area. May be convened
with 512. Writing-Emphasis Course*

413. Drugs, Brain and Behavior (3) I II Physiological, neurotoxic
and behavioral effects of drugs on individual neurotransmitter
systems in the brain. Special emphasis will be given to the
historical use and political significance of the major drugs of
abuse. P, 101, 230, 290, 302. May be convened with 513. Writing-
Emphasis Course*

414. Personality and Social Development (3) I II Research and
theory in developmental psychology with an emphasis on social
cognition, social and emotional growth. P, 290, 240 or 314. May
be convened with 514. Writing-Emphasis Course*

415. Advanced Topics in Cognitive Development (3) II Introduction
to major theories, methods, and research findings associated with
the development of cognition and intelligence. P, 230, 290; 240
or 313, or permission of instructor. Students should ideally also
have some background in cognitive psychology, e.g., 355. Writing
Emphasis Course*

416. Advanced Personality (3) I II In-depth consideration of
topics, issues and research in personality. P, 290, 316. May be
convened with 516. Writing-Emphasis Course.

417. Invertebrate Behavior Laboratory (3) II Animal behavior
laboratory in behavioral manipulation, observation, and data
recording with invertebrate animals. 3L, 2R. P, 101, 230 and 290.
May be convened with 517. Writing-Emphasis Course.*

419. Field-Based Human Learning (3) I II Learning principles in
terms of behavioral ecology. Naturalistic study with video and
computer methods of human services and academic settings. P, 101,
370. Open only to psychology majors and IDS majors with a
psychology subject area. May be convened with 519. Writing-
Emphasis Course.*

421. Psychology of Death and Loss (3) I II Basic concepts in a
psychology of death and loss, with emphasis on both the
adjustment to death and loss, and the underlying phenomenal,
humanistic and current social considerations. P, 290 or graduate
standing. May be convened with 521. Writing-Emphasis Course*

422. Psychopathology (3) II In-depth study of current theoretical
and research formulations in psychological disorders; various
approaches to behavior change. P, 290, 322. May be convened with
558. Writing-Emphasis Course*

425. Thinking, Reasoning, and Problem Solving (3) II Survey of
historical and current theories and research on human thinking,
reasoning and problem solving. P, 290. May be convened with 525.
Writing-Emphasis Course*

427. Field Methods in Environmental Psychology (3) II Behavior in
man-made or managed environments, with emphasis on objective
methods; designed for students having a professional interest in
environmental design or management. P, 371 or graduate standing.
(Identical with ARCH 427 and L AR 427) May be convened with 527.
Writing-Emphasis Course*

428. Antisemitism (3) (Identical with HIST 428)

429. Advanced Topics in Perception (3) [Rpt./2] I II Perception
of space, theories of object recognition, evolutionary
constraints, learning, attention, visual cognition, and theories
of perception. P, 230, 290, 329, 340. May be convened with 529.
Writing-Emphasis Course*

430. Psychology, Law and Social Policy (3) [Rpt./3] Critical
review of theory, methods and research in the psychology, law and
social policy interface. P, 101; 230 and 290; 300; 6 units of a
social science, or graduate standing. May be convened with 530.
Writing-Emphasis Course*

431. Ethical Issues in Psychology (3) I II A consideration of
issues in the derivation of ethical criteria, selection of the
appropriate subset of criteria to guide ethical decision-making,
and utilization of the criteria when making a decision in
psychological research or practice. P, upper-division standing or
honors student. May be convened with 531. Writing-Emphasis
Course.

435. Adult Development and Aging (3) I Change and continuity in
cognition, personality, and adjustment during adulthood, with
emphasis on aging processes and late life. P, 255, or 101 and two
courses in gerontology or human development; or graduate
standing. (Identical with GERO 435) May be convened with 535.
Writing-Emphasis Course*

437. Gerontology: A Multidisciplinary Perspective (3) I II
Biological, psychological, and social issues in aging, including
brain changes with age, cognitive change with age, and the social
impact of increasingly older population demographics. (Identical
with GERO 437) May be convened with 537. Writing-Emphasis Course*

446. Environmental Cognition (3) [Rpt.] I II Recent advances in
the area of environmental cognition, with an emphasis on
cognitive aspects of environmental psychology. May be convened
with 546. Writing-Emphasis Course*

449. Social Cognition (3) [Rpt./6 units] I II Analysis of social
phenomenon from a cognitive perspective; perception, memory,
thought and language concerning self, others, and social
situations. P, 290, 300, 355, or permission of instructor. May be
convened with 549. Writing-Emphasis Course.

450. Psychological Assessment and Testing (3) I II Evaluation of
assessment processes and of measurements of intelligence,
aptitudes, personality, and interests; test theory; social
implications. P, 290. May be convened with 550. Writing-Emphasis
Course*

451. Language Acquisition (3) II Normal development of language
in the child; relationship to cognitive and social development.
P, 230, 290, 355. (Identical with SP H 451) Writing-Emphasis
Course*

453. Lexical and Syntactic Development (3) I II Current theory
and data on first language acquisition with special focus on
research that relates linguistic theory and learnability theory
to empirical studies of children's linguistic abilities. P,
senior standing or consult department before enrolling; one
lower-division course in cognitive psychology, developmental
psychology, or linguistic theory. May be convened with 553.
Writing-Emphasis Course*

454. Culture and Mental Health (3) I Mental health in cross-
cultural perspective; universal and culture specific disorders,
traditional and western psychotherapy, cultural values in
treatment methods and in research. P, 290, 418. May be convened
with 554. Writing-Emphasis Course*

455. Philosophy and Artificial Intelligence (3) (Identical with
PHIL 455) May be convened with 555. Writing-Emphasis Course*

462. Mental Health Policy (3) [Rpt./3] I II Theory, research and
practice in law and mental health interactions and in the
delivery of mental health services. P, upper-division standing or
honors student. May be convened with 562. Writing-Emphasis
Course*

465. Neural Encoding, Memory and Computation in the Mammalian
Brain (3) I II Theoretical principles and biological mechanisms
by which information is represented, categorized, stored, and
recalled in specific central nervous system (CNS) circuits in the
course of adaptive behavior. P, one advanced course in
neurobiology, biological or cognitive psychology, one advanced
course in math or computer science. May be convened with 565.
Writing-Emphasis Course*

466. Principles of Mammalian Systems Neurophysiology (2) I II
Topics in the neurophysiology of sensation, perception,
cognition, and action in mammals illustrating the application of
modern research methods to the understanding of higher brain
function. Enrollment is restricted to those concurrently enrolled
in the lab. P, NRSC 588; CR, PSYC 403. (Identical with NRSC 466)
May be convened with 566. Writing-Emphasis Course*

470. Principles of Psychophysiology (3) Overview, principles,
theory and applications of physiological assessment. P, 290, 302
and 405. CR, 471. May be convened with 570.

471. Psychophysiology Laboratory (1) Applied laboratory in
psychophysiological assessment to be taken concurrently with 470.
P, 290, 302 and 405. CR, 470. May be convened with 571.

472. Human Memory Systems (3) II Examines the processing systems
that underlie human learning, memory and cognition; emphasizing
cognitive, neuroscientific and computational approaches to
research and theory. P, 290, 355. May be convened with 572.
Writing-Emphasis Course*

473. Natural Language Processing (3) II (Identical with LING 473)
May be convened with 573. Writing-Emphasis Course*

474. Animal-Human Communication (3) II (Identical with ECOL 474)
May be convened with 574.

475. History of Psychology (3) I Growth of psychology as a
science; major schools and theories; contributions of famous
investigators and major advances; psychology as an art and a
science today. P, 290 and 6 upper-division units in psychology.
May be convened with 575. Writing-Emphasis Course*

478. Sleep and Sleep Disorders (3) II Topics include sleepwake
rhythms, sleep deprivation, dreams, and the diagnosis and
treatment of sleep disorders. P, 290, 302. May be convened with
578. Writing-Emphasis Course*

479. Topics in the Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behavior (3)
[Rpt./1] I II Variable content (consult schedule): learning,
cognition, perception, psycholinguistics, emotion, others. P, 290
and 6 units of upper-division psychology; or grad. standing. Open
only to psychology majors and IDS majors with a psychology
subject area. May be convened with 579. Writing-Emphasis Course*

484. Psychology and Health (3) [Rpt./1] I II Current research and
theory concerning psychological contributions to health
maintenance, illness prevention and treatment, and the
organization of health services. May be convened with 584.
Writing-Emphasis Course*

485. Contemporary Issues in Psychology (3) [Rpt./1] I II Variable
content (consult schedule): major topical problems in
psychological research, theory, and applications. P, 290 and 6
units of upper-division psychology. Open only to psychology
majors and IDS majors with a psychology subject area. May be
convened with 585. Writing-Emphasis Course*

488. Computational Linguistics (3) I (Identical with LING 488)
May be convened with 588. Writing-Emphasis Course*

*Writing-Emphasis Course. P, satisfaction of the upper-divi
sion writing-proficiency requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis
Courses" in the Academic Policies and Graduation Requirements
section of this catalog).

500a-500b. Current Issues in Psychological Theory and Research
(3-3) Intensive examination of a range of content areas addressed
in contemporary psychological theory and research. Open to
psychology graduate students only.

501. Biological Bases of Motivation (3) I For a description of
course topics, see 401. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research paper on a single aspect of body chemistry and
behavior. P, 101; 230 and 290, or 250; 302 or 8 units of
biological lab. science. May be convened with 401.

502. Principles of Neuroanatomy (4) II (Identical with ANAT 502)

503. Laboratory in Mammalian Systems Neurophysiology (3) I II For
a description of course topics, see 403. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth research paper on a single
aspect of a current problem in neurological psychology. P, 290,
302. (Identical with NRSC 503) May be convened with 403.

504. Human Brain-Behavior Relationships (3) I Human brain
functions in relation to intelligence, speech, memory, judgment
and reasoning, and visual-spatial abilities; methods of
examination of human brain functioning in relation to individual
differences in both normal and brain-damaged persons. P, 290,
302, 502.

507a-507b. Statistical Methods in Psychological Research (3-3)
Statistical research design, methods and metascience. 507a:
Bivariate and multiple regression, application of structural
equations modeling to manifest variable (path analysis) and
latent variable (multivariate) causal analysis. 507b: Application
of the general linear model to analysis of variance, covariance
and multiple comparisons, exploratory and confirmatory factor
analysis, the canonical correlation, discriminant function
analysis and multivariate analysis of variance. Open to majors
only.

508. Methods for Field Research (3) I II Research problems and
methods particularly relevant to field research. The logic of
inquiry and approaches to data analysis appropriate to field
trials and quasi-experimental research.

509. History of Psychological Theories and Research (3) II
Development of psychology as a science; schools, systems,
theories, major advances, famous investigators. Open to majors
only.

510. Advanced Social Psychology (3) I II For a description of
course topics, see 410. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research paper on a single aspect of the theory or
method of social psychology. May be convened with 410.

511. Animal Behavior (3) I For a description of course topics,
see 411. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research
paper on a single aspect of animal behavior. P, 290. May be
convened with 411.

512. Animal Learning (3) II For a description of course topics,
see 412. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research
paper on an aspect of animal learning. P, 290. May be convened
with 412.

513. Drugs, Brain and Behavior (3) I II For a description of
course topics, see 414. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional term paper pertinent to the course topic. P, 101, 230,
290, 302. May be convened with 413.

514. Personality and Social Development (3) I II For a
description of course topics, see 414. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth research paper on an aspect of
personality and social development. P, 290, 313 or 314. May be
convened with 414.

515. Advanced Topics in Cognitive Development (3) Examination of
major theories and research findings in cognitive development,
with emphasis on infant cognition and conceptual development
through childhood. Topics include concept representation and
development, naive theories of the world, and knowledge
restructuring. P, 313 or permission of instructor.

516. Advanced Personality (3) I II For a description of course
topics, see 416. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth
research paper on an aspect of personality study. P, 290, 316.
May be convened with 416.

517. Invertebrate Behavior Laboratory (3) II For a description of
course topics, see 417. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional paper or presentation to the class. May be convened
with 417.

519. Field-Based Human Learning (3) I II For a description of
course topics, see 419. Graduate-level requirements include
advanced research applications in psychology or related areas. P,
101, 370.May be convened with 419.

521. Psychology of Death and Loss (3) I II For a description of
course topics, see 421. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research paper on an aspect of psychology of death or
loss. P, 290 or graduate standing. May be convened with 421.

522. Psychopathology (3) II For a description of course topics,
see 422. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research
paper on psychopathology. May be convened with 422.

525. Thinking, Reasoning, and Problem Solving (3) II For a
description of course topics, see 425. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth research paper on an aspect of
thinking, reasoning, or problem solving. May be convened with
425.

527. Field Methods in Environmental Psychology (3) II For a
description of course topics, see 427. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth research paper on an aspect of
environmental psychology field methods. P, 371 or graduate
standing. (Identical with ARCH 527 and L AR 527) May be convened
with 427.

528. Cognitive Neuroscience (3) [Rpt./1] I II Recent advances in
analysis of the neural bases of cognitive functions, such as
learning, memory, and thinking.

529. Advanced Topics in Perception (3) [Rpt./2] I II For a
description of course topics, see 429. Graduate-level
requirements include an additional paper on a particular issue.
P, 230, 290,340. May be convened with 429.

530. Psychology, Law and Social Policy (3) [Rpt./3] I II Critical
review of theory, methods, and research in the psychology, law
and social policy interface. May be convened with 430.

531. Ethical Issues in Psychology (3) I II For a description of
course topics, see 431. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research paper on a single aspect of the course topic.
May be convened with 431.

535. Adult Development and Aging (3) I For a description of
course topics, see 435. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research paper on an aspect of a specific psychological
problem of the aged. P, 290 or 101 and two courses in gerontology
or human development; or graduate standing. (Identical with GERO
535) May be convened with 435.

537. Gerontology: A Multidisciplinary Perspective (3) I II For a
description of course topics, see 437. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth research paper on a single
aspect of gerontology. (Identical with GERO 537 and NRSC 537) May
be convened with 437.

540. Visual Cognition (3) [Rpt./1] I II Recent advances in the
areas of perception and attention, with an emphasis on visual
process.

541. Topics in Language and Cognition (3) [Rpt./1] I II Variable
content, including language acquisition, the relation between
language and spatial cognition, and the evolution of mind. P,
graduate majors in linguistics and psychology; others consult
with department before enrolling.

542. Psycholinguistics (3) [Rpt./1] I II Recent advances in the
area of psycholinguistics, with an emphasis on sentence
processing and the contribution of linguistic theory to an
understanding of psychological mechanisms.

546. Environmental Cognition (3) [Rpt./1] I II For a description
of course topics, see 446. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research paper on a single aspect of environmental
cognition. May be convened with 446.

549. Social Cognition (3) [Rpt./6 units] I II For a description
of course topics, see 449. Graduate-level requirements include a
research paper pertinent to the topic of social cognition. May be
convened with 449.

550. Psychological Assessment and Testing (3) I II For a
description of course topics, see 450. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth research paper on psychological
assessment and testing. May be convened with 450.

553. Lexical and Syntactic Development (3) I II For a description
of course topics, see 453. Graduate-level requirements include a
written paper on a subject pertinent to topic area. (Identical
with LING 553) May be convened with 453.

554. Culture and Mental Health (3) I For a description of course
topics, see 454. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth
research paper on culture and mental health. P, 422. May be
convened with 454.

555. Philosophy and Artificial Intelligence (3) (Identical with
PHIL 555) May be convened with 455.

562. Mental Health Policy (3) [Rpt./3] I II For description of
course topics, see 462. Graduate-level requirements include an
extra term paper which ultimately could be prepared for
publication as well as an additional oral class participation.
May be convened with 462.

563a-563b. Forensic Assessment: Intervention and Treatment I, II
(3-3) I II Theory, research and practice in the assessment and
treatment of, and intervention with, persons involved with the
legal process who have clinical problems. P, permission of the
instructor

564. Methods for Psychosocial Research (3) I Logic of inquiry and
issues of philosophy of science as they apply to psychosocial
research. Problems encountered by researchers in personality,
family studies, social and clinical psychology, and creative
approaches to their data analysis and methodological design
resolutions.

565. Neural Encoding, Memory and Computation in the Mammalian
Brain (3) I II For a description of course topics, see 465.
Graduate-level requirements include Graduate-level requirements
include an in-depth research paper on a single aspect of neural
encoding. (Identical with NRSC 565) May be convened with 465.

566. Principles of Mammalian Systems Neurophysiology (2) I II For
a description of course topics, see 466. Graduate-level
requirements include Graduate-level requirements include an
additional term paper pertinent to current topics in the
neurophysiology of sensation, perception, cognition and action in
mammals illustrating the application of modern research methods
to the understanding of higher brain function. P, NRSC 588; CR,
PSYC 403 (Identical with NRSC 566).

567. Experimental Phonetics: Physiology (3) (Identical with SP H
567)

568. Experimental Phonetics: Acoustics and Perception (3) II
(Identical with SP H 568)

570. Principles of Psychophysiology (3) For a description of
course topics, see 470. Graduate-level requirements include a
more comprehensive literature review. P, graduate status or 290,
302 and 405. CR, 471. May be convened with 470.

571. Psychophysiology Laboratory (1) For a description of course
topics, see 471. Graduate-level requirements include more
sophisticated data analysis and statistics. P, graduate status or
290, 302 and 405. CR, 570. May be convened with 471.

572. Human Memory Systems (3) II For a description of course
topics, see 472. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth
research paper on human memory and cognition. P, 230, 290 or
graduate standing. May be convened with 472.

573. Natural Language Processing (3) II (Identical with LING 573)
May be convened with 473.

574. Animal-Human Communication (3) II (Identical with ECOL 574)
May be convened with 474.

575. History of Psychology (3) I For a description of course
topics, see 475. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth
research paper on an aspect of history of psychology. P, 290 and
6 upper-division units in psychology. May be convened with 475.

578. Sleep and Sleep Disorders (3) II For a description of course
topics, see 478. Graduate-level requirements include a critical
review of the research literature of a relevant topic. P, 290,
302. May be convened with 478.

579. Topics in the Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behavior (3)
[Rpt./1] I II For a description of course topics, see 479.
Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on
an aspect of cognitive and affective bases of behavior. P, 290
and 6 units of upper-division psychology; or graduate standing.
May be convened with 479.

580. Clinical Neuropsychology (3) II Cognitive and affective
sequelae of human central nervous system disease/damage, with
emphasis on clinical evaluation, management and rehabilitation.

582. Advanced Psychopathology (3) [Rpt./1] I II Advanced survey
of current theory and research in symptoms, causes and treatment
of the major psychological disorders.

584. Psychology and Health (3) [Rpt./1] I II For a description of
course topics, see 484. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional paper pertaining to the course topic. May be convened
with 484.

585. Contemporary Issues in Psychology (3) [Rpt./1] I II For a
description of course topics, see 485. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth research paper on an aspect of
contemporary psychological research. P, 290 and 6 units of upper-
division psychology; or graduate standing. May be convened with
485.

588. Computational Linguistics (3) I (Identical with LING 588)
May be convened with 488.

596. Seminar
a. Social Psychology (3) [Rpt./4] I II
c. Developmental Psychology (3) [Rpt./1] I II
e. Biopsychology (3) [Rpt./1] I II
f. Cognitive Psychology (3) [Rpt./1] I II
g. Clinical Psychology (3) [Rpt./4] I II
h. Law, Psychology, and Policy (3) [Rpt./4] I II (Identical with
LAW 596h)
i. Quantitative Methods (3) [Rpt./1] I II
k. Psychopolitics (2) [Rpt./4 units] I II
u. Interdisciplinary Environment-Behavior-Design (3) [Rpt./1] II
(Identical with ENV 596u, which is home)

597. Workshop
a. Statistical Software for Psychological Research (2) P or CR,
507a-507b.
b. Statistical Software for Psychological Research (2) P or CR,
507a-507b.
c. Advanced Statistical Methods (3) [Rpt./12 units] I II S P,
507a-507b.
d. Program Evaluation (1-3) [Rpt./6 units] I II S P, graduate
standing. Permission of the instructor is required.

621. Clinical Assessment Methods (3) II Theory and practice in
interview techniques and cognitive and personality assessment.
Open to majors only.

622. Principles of Behavior Therapy (3) I Systematic review of
the major theories of behavior modification, with emphasis on
application to clinical problems. Open to graduate psychology
majors only.

626. Family Therapy (3) I II Theoretical bases underlying
different methods of family therapy and their clinical
applications. Includes system theory, the family as a system,
therapeutic principles, and process and outcome research.

628. Systems of Psychotherapy (3) [Rpt./2] I II Current research
and theory in psychotherapy.

635. Issues in Rural Health Care (3) II (Identical with NURS 635)

694. Practicum
a. Clinical Interviewing and Assessment (1-3)[Rpt./1] I II Open
to clinical psychology students only.
b. Psychotherapy (1-3) [Rpt./1] I II Open to clinical psychology
students only.
c. Advanced Psychotherapy (1-3) [Rpt./1] I II Open to clinical
psychology students only.

695. Colloquium
a. Motor Control (2) II (Identical with EXSS 695a)

696. Seminar
f. Linguistic Investigations and Applications (3) I II (Identical
with LING 696f, which is home)

 


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