The University of Arizona  1993-95 General Catalog

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Physics (PHYS)
PAS Building, Room 260
(520) 621-6824

Professors Robert L. Thews, Acting Department Head, W. David
Arnett, Bruce R. Barrett, Stanley Bashkin (Emeritus), William S.
Bickel, Leon Blitzer (Emeritus), Theodore Bowen, Adam S. Burrows,
Peter A. Carruthers, Robert H. Chambers, Douglas J. Donahue, Roy
M. Emrick, Charles M. Falco, Chang-Yun Fan (Emeritus), Li Zhi
Fang, Peter A. Franken, Jose D. Garcia, Henry A. Hill, Donald R.
Huffman, Edgar W. Jenkins, Kurt W. Just, John O. Kessler, Rein
Kilkson, Stephan W. Koch, Sigurd Kohler, Willis E. Lamb, Jr.,
John A. Leavitt, Hormoz M. Mahmoud (Emeritus), John D. McCullen,
Laurence C. McIntyre, Jr., Pierre Meystre, Robert H. Parmenter,
Adrian N. Patrascioiu, Johann Rafelski, John W. Robson
(Emeritus), John Rutherfoord, Michael D. Scadron, Alwyn C. Scott,
Royal W. Stark, John O. Stoner, Jr., Robert L. Thews, Carl T.
Tomizuka, Joseph J. Vuillemin, Roald K. Wangsness (Emeritus),
Albert B. Weaver (Emeritus), William H. Wing

Associate Professors Anna Hasenfratz, Ke-Chiang Hsieh, Sumit
Mazumdar, Fulvio Melia, Michael A. Shupe, Daniel Stein, Douglas
Toussaint, Jay E. Treat (Emeritus)

Assistant Professors Geoffrey E. Forden, Kenneth A. Johns, Ina
Sarcevic, Wing Y. Tam, Ewan M. Wright

The department offers the degrees of Bachelor of Science, Master
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy with a major in physics. A
Bachelor of Science in Education and Master of Education are
available with a teaching major in physics. For graduate
admission and degree requirements, consult the Graduate Catalog.
The Bachelor of Science in Engineering Physics is offered through
the College of Engineering and Mines. Students should consult the
appropriate department concerning areas in which research is
being conducted.

The major in physics: 36 units, in addition to the general
education requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree
described in the College of Arts and Sciences section of this
catalog. Required courses are 111a-111b, 112a-112b, 410, 415a,
420, 425, 435, 480a-480b and 485. Under special circumstances
102a-102b, 180a-180b and 330 or 110, 116, 121, and 330 may be
substituted for 111a-111b and 112a-112b. The following courses
are strongly recommended: 412, 415b, 436, 475a-475b, 481a-481b;
CHEM 103a-103b, 104a-104b or 105a-105b. MATH 254 is recommended
as a prerequisite for upper-division physics.

A theoretical astrophysics concentration is available to physics
majors. This concentration is an informal program of advising and
research opportunities and does not lead to a special or separate
degree. Interested students should contact their departmental
academic advisors.

The major in engineering physics: Refer to the College of
Engineering and Mines section of this catalog. An engineering
physics major who intends to do graduate work in physics should
discuss his or her plans with the advisor.

The teaching major: 30 units, including 110, 116, 121, 330 or
111a-111b and 112a-112b, 433, 480a-480b. Courses in related
fields, such as astronomy, may be chosen in consultation with the
departmental advisor.

The teaching minor: 18 units, including 102a-102b and 180a-180b,
110, 116, 121 or 111a-111b and 112a-112b, 433, 480a, and other
courses chosen in consultation with the departmental advisor.

The department participates in the honors program.

101. Physics in the Modern World (4) I II Basic concepts and the
societal impact of physics, with emphasis on modern physics.
Topics include mechanics, wave motion, energy, light, nuclear and
atomic physics, and astrophysics. 3R, 3L. Open to nonmajors only.
P, high school algebra.

102a-102b.* Introductory Physics (3-3) CDT Designed for liberal
arts and life science majors with no calculus background. Survey
of the basic fields of physics, with emphasis on applications to
other fields and historical development. P, high school algebra,
geometry, and trigonometry. Both 102a and 102b are offered each
semester. Those wishing to take this course as a lecture-
laboratory course should register concurrently for 180a or 180b.

104a-104b.* Introductory Physics with Calculus (4-4) Principles
of kinematics, dynamics, wave motion and acoustics,
thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, geometrical and
physical optics, optical instruments, atomic and nuclear physics.
P, CR MATH 125b.

107. The Physics of Music (4) I CDT Sound production, musical
instruments, frequency analysis, physics of hearing,
psychological and physiological effects, harmony and scales, hall
acoustics, electronic production and recording. 3R, 3L.

110.* Introductory Mechanics (4) I II CDT Vector concepts;
kinematics, statics, and dynamics for point masses, particle
systems, and rigid bodies; conservation laws of energy, momentum,
and angular momentum. 4R, 2L. P, MATH 125a, CR, 125b.

111a-111b.* Introduction to Mechanics, Thermodynamics and
Relativity (4-4) I II Kinematics and dynamics of particles and
rigid bodies, conservation laws, first and second laws of
thermodynamics and special theory of relativity. 4R, 2L. P, or
CR, MATH 125a for 111a; MATH 125b for 111b.

112a-112b.* Introduction to Electricity, Magnetism, Optics and
Quantum Theory (4-4) I II Laws of electric and magnetic fields,
dc and ac circuits, Maxwell's equations, EM waves, physical and
geometrical optics, and quantum theory. 4R, 2L. P, 111b, CR, MATH
223 for 112a.

116.* Introductory Electricity and Magnetism (4) I II CDT Field
concepts, electrostatics, magnetostatics, currents,
electromagnetic phenomena and electromagnetic waves. 4R, 2L. P,
110, CR, MATH 223.

121.* Introductory Optics, Acoustics and Heat (2-3) I II CDT
Introduction to heat and thermodynamics; treatment of optics and
acoustics from viewpoint of scalar wave theory. 3R, 2L. P, 110,
CR, MATH 223.

180a-180b. Introductory Laboratory (1-1) Quantitative experiments
in physics, both illustrative and exploratory. Designed to
accompany 102a-102b; sections are established corresponding to
each course. 3L. P, CR, 102a-102b. Both 180a and 180b are offered
each semester.

195. Colloquium
a. Creation of the Universe (1) I

330.* Introduction to Modern Physics (3) I II CDT Introduction to
modern physics; quantum theory, relativity, atomic structure,
nuclear physics. P, 110, 116, 121; MATH 223.

*Credit will be allowed for only one of the following sequences
of courses: 102a-102b with 180a-180b; 104a-104b with 180a-180b;
110-116-121-330; 111a-111b-112a-112b.

402. Medical Physics (3) I CDT Basic physics of the human body:
the principles of mechanics, electricity, sound, light, and
radiation as they apply to physiology, with emphasis on
instrumentation for diagnosis and treatment. P, 104b or 102b and
MATH 124 or equivalent. May be convened with 502.

410. Theoretical Mechanics I (3) I II CDT Dynamics of particles
and aggregates, with emphasis on the use of vector methods. P,
112a, MATH 223, 254.

412. Theoretical Mechanics II (3) II CDT Continuation of 410;
mechanics of the continuum; introduction to variational
principles; Lagrange's equations. P, 410, MATH 254.

415a-415b. Electricity and Magnetism (3-3) CDT Electromagnetic
phenomena; Maxwell's equations. P, 410 or MATH 422a.

420. Optics (3) I II CDT Electromagnetic waves; rays,
interference, diffraction, scattering; applications to imaging
systems, Fourier methods, holography, and crystal optics. P,
112b, MATH 223.

425. Thermodynamics (3) I II CDT Basic laws of thermal
equilibrium; heat engines; ideal and non-ideal gases; phase
transitions; introduction to irreversible processes, kinetic
theory, and statistical mechanics. P, 112b, MATH 223.

430. Introduction to Biophysics (2) I CDT Concepts and
experimental techniques of molecular biophysics; physical
properties of biological macromolecules and cell organelles,
optical interactions, macromolecular transitions, molecular
mechanism or regulation. P, 102b, CHEM 103a-103b. (Identical with
MIC 430) May be convened with 530.

433. Physics Demonstrations (1-3) II Introduction to teaching
materials and laboratory demonstrations illustrating principles
of classical and modern physics, with emphasis on inexpensive
techniques and direct experience. Advanced degree credit
available for nonmajors only. P, two semesters of physics. May be
convened with 533.

435. Introductory Quantum Theory and Atomic Spectra (3) I II CDT
Introductory quantum mechanics; solutions of the Schroedinger
equation for hydrogen-like atoms; perturbation theory; atomic
structure; spectra of one and many electron systems; Zeeman-
Paschen-Bach effects; hyperfine structure. P, 330 or 112b, 410,
MATH 254; CR, 475a or MATH 413 recommended.

436. Applications of Introductory Quantum Theory (3) I II CDT
Applications of quantum theory to molecules, atomic nuclei,
elementary particles and simple solids. P, 435. May be convened
with 536.

440a-440b. Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy for Experimentalists
(3-3) CDT Experimental techniques to generate, analyze and detect
photons from X-ray to IR; interpretation of spectra from gases,
liquids, solids and biological macromolecules; light scattering,
polarization. P, 330 or 112b. (Identical with OPTI 440a-440b) May
be convened with 540a-540b.

445. Experimental Physics 445a-445b-445c are three five-week
lecture courses; none is prerequisite to any other.
a. Experimental Spectroscopy (1) I II S Laboratory experiments
with spectroscopic sources, spectrometers, instrument functions,
detectors, light collection optics, spectral recording and
analysis. P, 110, 116, 121, or consult department before
enrolling. May be convened with 545a.
b. Experimental Acoustics (1) I II S Laboratory experiments with
sound sources, oscilloscopes, spectrum analyzers, sound level
meters, filters, musical instruments, recording, room acoustics.
P, 110, 116, 121, or consult department before enrolling. May be
convened with 545b.
c. Experimental Microscopy, Light Scattering and Optics of Small
Particles (1) I II S Laboratory experiments with microscopes and
polarized scattered light to characterize small particles and
surfaces, optical constants, lasers remote sensing. P, 110, 116,
121, or consult department before enrolling. May be convened with
545c.

450. Introductory Nuclear Physics (3) II CDT Basic concepts of
nuclear physics: structure and stability of nucleus; nuclear
forces; stable systems; nuclear reactions; decay of unstable
systems; nuclear radiation characteristics. P, 330 or 112b, MATH
254. May be convened with 550.

460. Introductory Solid-State Physics (3) I II CDT Properties of
solids from molecular, atomic, and electronic theory; electric,
magnetic, and thermal properties of metals, insulators, and
semiconductors; free electron and band theories. P, 330 or 112b.
May be convened with 560.

475a-475b. Methods of Mathematical Physics (3-3) CDT Vector and
tensor analysis; differential and integral equations; Green's
functions; variational techniques; linear operator theory, with
emphasis on physical applications. P, 410, MATH 254, CR, 415a-
415b. May be convened with 575a-575b.

480a-480b. Methods of Experimental Physics I (1 to 3--1 to 3)
Designed to develop experimental skills and to demonstrate
important concepts in classical and modern physics. 3L. P, two
upper-division courses in phys. or CR. Both 480a and 480b are
offered each semester, but students are encouraged not to enroll 
simultaneously. Writing-Emphasis Course. P, Satisfaction of the
upper-division  writing-proficiency requirement (see "Writing-
Emphasis Courses" in the Academic Guidelines section of this
catalog).

481a-481b. Methods of Experimental Physics II (1 to 3--1 to 3)
Continuation of 480a-480b, with emphasis on individual work. 3 or
6L. P, 480b; ten units of upper-division physics. Both 481a and
481b are offered each semester, but students are encouraged not
to enroll simultaneously.

485. Introduction to Computational Physics (3) I An introduction
to numerical techniques physicists actually employ to solve real
physics problems. Its focus is on problems whose solution can
best be  obtained numerically and on the use of the standard
mathematics and graphics packages. Sample physics topics include
chaos and nonlinear mechanics, quantum perturbation theory and
eigenvalues, particle trajectories, and stellar structure. P,
110, 116, 121 or 111a-111b and 112a-112b.

502. Medical Physics (3) I CDT For a description of course
topics, see 402. Graduate-level requirements include an original
report demonstrating the ability to construct mathematical models
related to one of the diagnostic or therapeutic modalities
discussed in the course. P, 104b or 102b and MATH 124 or
equivalent. May be convened with 402.

503. Quantum Optics and Lasers (3) I (Identical with OPTI 503)

511. Analytical Mechanics (3) I Laws of motion as developed by
Newton, d'Alembert, Lagrange and Hamilton; dynamics of particles
and rigid bodies. P, 410.

513. Topics in Advanced Mechanics (3) II Modern topics in
classical mechanics, including canonical perturbation theory,
invariant mappings, nonintegrated system stochastic behavior and
applications to semi-classical quantum theory. P, 511.

515a-515b. Electromagnetic Theory (3-3) Theory of classical
electromagnetic phenomena, including time-dependent and static
solutions of Maxwell's equations, radiation theory, and
relativistic electrodynamics. P, 415b, 475b.

525. Advanced Thermodynamics and Kinetic Theory (3) I First and
second laws of thermodynamics and their applications; Boltzmann
transport equation; H-theorem; mean free path methods applied to
viscosity, thermal conductivity, and diffusion. P, 425.

528. Statistical Mechanics (3) II Physical statistics; the
connection between the thermodynamic properties of a macroscopic
system and the statistics of the fundamental components; Maxwell-
Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac, Einstein-Bose statistics. P, 475b.

529. Information and Disorder in Optics and Physics (3) I
(Identical with OPTI 529)

530. Introduction to Biophysics (2) I CDT For a description of
course topics, see 430. Graduate-level requirements include extra
assignments. P, 102b, CHEM 103a-103b. (Identical with MBIM 530)
May be convened with 430.

531. Biophysical Theory (2) II Physical concepts and theories
describing biomolecular structure and function, molecular
evolution, limits to structure, symmetry, oligomer and virus
structure, organelle structure and function. (Identical with MBIM
531)

533. Physics Demonstrations (1-3) II For a description of course
topics, see 433. Graduate-level requirements include assisting
with undergraduate lecture planning and demonstrations. Advanced
degree credit available for nonmajors only. P, two semesters of
physics. May be convened with 433.

535. Advanced Atomic Physics (3) II 1994-95 Details of atomic
structure; interactions of atoms with electromagnetic fields,
electrons and ions; techniques for calculating unperturbed and
perturbed energy levels, transition probabilities, and atomic
interaction cross sections. P, 511, 515b, 570b.

536. Applications of Introductory Quantum Theory (3) I II CDT For
a description of course topics, see 436. Graduate-level
requirements include additional homework problems. P, 435. May be
convened with 436.

540a-540b. Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy for Experimentalists
(3-3) For a description of course topics, see 440a-440b.
Graduate-level requirements include homework problem assignments
at an advanced level. P, 330 or 112b. (Identical with OPTI 540a-
540b) May be convened with 440a-440b.

543. Laser Physics (3) I (Identical with OPTI 543)

545. Experimental Physics 545a-545b-545c are three five-week
lecture courses; none is prerequisite to any other.
a. Experimental Spectroscopy (1) I II S For a description of
course topics, see 445a. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research report on a topic selected in consultation with
the instructor. P, 110, 116, 121, or consult department before
enrolling. May be convened with 445a.
b. Experimental Acoustics (1) I II S For a description of course
topics, see 445b. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth
research report on a topic selected in consultation with the
instructor. P, 110, 116, 121, or consult department before
enrolling. May be convened with 445b.
c. Experimental Microscopy, Light Scattering and Optics of Small
Particles (1) I II S For a description of course topics, see
445c. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research
report on a topic selected in consultation with the instructor.
P, 110, 116, 121, or consult department before enrolling. May be
convened with 445c.

550. Introductory Nuclear Physics (3) II For a description of
course topics, see 450. Graduate-level requirements include
additional special topics, to be determined by the instructor. P,
330 or 112b, MATH 254. May be convened with 450.

551. Nuclear Physics (3) I Theory of nuclear systems, including
stability, decay, nuclear forces, scattering, reactions,
structure, and interaction with electromagnetic radiation. P, CR,
570a-570b.

552. The Many-Body Problem in Nuclear Physics (3) [Rpt.] II 1994-
95 Fermi gas model, Green's functions, Wick's and Goldstone's
theorems, theory of nuclear matter, microscopic theory of finite
nuclei. P, 570b.

556a-556b. Electrodynamics of Conducting Fluids and Plasmas (3-3)
(Identical with PTYS 556a-556b)

559. Topics in Condensed Matter Theory (3) I Quantum theory of
solids. Elementary excitations. Electron-phonon and electron-
electron interactions. Spins and magnetism. Metal-insulator
transitions. Basic concepts in superconductivity. P, 460/560,
475a-475b.

560. Introductory Solid-State Physics (3) I II CDT For a
description of course topics, see 460. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth paper on a topic in solid-state
physics. P, 330 or 112b. May be convened with 460.

561. Physics of the Solid State (3) II Elementary excitations in
solids, phonons, electrons and holes, excitons, biexcitons,
interaction of light with semiconductors, polaritons, high
excitation phenomena, dielectric formalism of optical response,
many-body effects in a Coulomb system. P, 460, 570, or OPTI 507
recommended but not formally required. (Identical with OPTI 561)

570a-570b. Quantum Mechanics (3-3) Principles of quantum
mechanics; wave mechanics and matrix mechanics; applications to
atomic structure and spectroscopy. P, 475a-475b recommended but
not required.

571. Symmetry Groups in Physics (3) I Algebraic results of the
theory of groups which find repeated applications in atomic,
molecular, nuclear and particle physics. Continuous groups, Lie
algebras, discrete groups, irreducible tensors. P, 570a-570b.

575a-575b. Methods of Mathematical Physics (3-3) For a
description of course topics, see 475a-475b. Graduate-level
requirements include advanced examinations, as determined by the
instructor. P, 410, MATH 254, CR, 415a-415b. May be convened with
475a-475b.

577a-577b. Theory of Relativity (3-3) 1994-95 Special theory of
relativity and its application to mechanics and electrodynamics;
tensor calculus and general relativity; relativistic astrophysics
and cosmology. P, 475b.

579a-579b. Advanced Relativistic Quantum Mechanics (3-3)
Continuous groups; scattering theory; relativistic wave
equations; quantum electrodynamics, Feynman diagrams, dispersion
theory, renormalization; strong and weak interactions. P, 515b,
570b.

580a-580b. Quantum Field Theory (3-3) 1993-94 Meaning of
quantized fields; symmetry principles, free fields; general
properties of interactions and peculiarities of electrodynamics
and gravity. P, 570b, 577a.

581. Elementary Particle Physics (3) I Production, interaction,
and decay of mesons, baryons and leptons; high energy scattering
of elementary particles; particle classification and symmetries;
theoretical interpretation. P, 436.

582. High Energy Astrophysics (3) II 1994-95 (Identical with ASTR
582)

585. Stellar Pulsation (1-3) [Rpt./5] I II Stellar pulsation, the
solar atmosphere, solar seismology and long-term solar
variability related to climate.

586. Techniques in Particle Physics (3) II 1994-95 Classification
of elementary particles and their interactions with matter,
relativistic kinematics, detectors, data acquisition techniques,
statistical techniques, analysis of experiments, cosmic
radiation, and accelerators.

589. Topics in Theoretical Astrophysics (3) [Rpt.] I Current
topics in theoretical astrophysics in depth, with emphasis on the
methodology and techniques of the theorist and the cross-
disciplinary nature of astrophysics theory. Example subjects are
nuclear astrophysics, hydrodynamics, transient phenomena,
planetary interiors and atmospheres, neutron stars, jets, and the
evolution of star clusters. (Identical with ASTR 589 and PTYS
589)

596. Seminar
a. Current Problems in Molecular Biophysics (1) I II [Rpt.]
(Identical with MBIM 596a)
c. The Physics of Thin Films (3) II P, 460.

h. Philosophy of Physical Science (3) [Rpt./2] (Identical with
PHIL 596h, which is home)
k. Topics in Colliding Beam Physics (1) [Rpt./9 units] I P, 570a-
570b.

643. Quantum Optics (3) II (Identical with OPTI 643)

685. Graduate Physics Laboratory (3) [Rpt./2] II Introduction to
modern research methods and experiments. Problems in low-
temperature physics; solid-state, atomic, and nuclear
spectroscopy; computer-based data acquisition and analysis;
solar-energy physics; and others.

695. Colloquium
a. Current Problems in Physics (1) [Rpt./4 units] I II

697. Workshop
a. Problems in Computational Science (3) [Rpt./1] I II (Identical
with MATH 697a, which is home)

 


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