The University of Arizona  1993-95 General Catalog

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Pharmacy Practice (PHPR)
Pharmacy Building, Room 318
(520) 626-5730

Professors John E. Murphy, Head, Jack R. Arndt, J. Lyle
Bootman,Michael Mayersohn (Pharmaceutical Sciences), Gary H.
Smith, Theodore G. Tong, Samuel H. Yalkowsky (Pharmaceutical
Sciences)

Associate Professors Edward P. Armstrong, Stephen Joel Coons,
Martha P. Fankhauser, Marie E. Gardner, Martin D. Higbee, Michael
D. Katz, Paul E. Nolan, Patricia M. Plezia

ssistant Professors Suzanne Campbell, Hsiao-Hui (Sherry) Chow
(Pharmaceutical Sciences), JoLaine R. Draugalis, Victor A.
Elsberry, Brian L. Erstad, Brian G. Ortmeier, Karen Ann Sauer

Adjunct Professor Donald C. Brodie

Adjunct Associate Professors Alan D. Barreuther, William F.
Fritz, James R. Guidry, G. Richard Hall, Carl E. Trinca

Adjunct Assistant Professors David A. Apgar, William N. Jones,
Robert J. Lipsy, Gregory Morrill, Michael Noel, Sharon Peppler,
Carol J. Rollins, Michael I. Smith

Teaching Associate David Lee

Assistant Research Scientist Marion K. Slack

The Department of Pharmacy Practice offers courses leading to the
Doctor of Pharmacy degree. A Master of Science with a major in
pharmacy, with concentrations available in the areas of
institutional pharmacy administration and pharmacy
administration, is offered through the Graduate College. Graduate
study in pharmacy administration and pharmaceutical sciences
(pharmaceutics, pharmacokinetics) leading to a Doctor of
Philosophy degree with a major in pharmacy or pharmaceutical
sciences is also available. For information regarding
undergraduate admission and degree requirements, please consult
the College of Pharmacy section of this catalog; for graduate
admission and degree requirements, please see the Graduate
Catalog.

A student must be enrolled in the College of Pharmacy before
taking any pharmacy practice course, except as approved by the
department.

The department participates in the honors program.

195. Colloquium
a. Perspectives on Health Care: Current Issues and Trends (1) I

400. Pharmaceutical Calculations (2) I Pharmaceutical
calculations pertinent to the selection, formulation,
preparation, dosage and administration of drugs and their dosage
forms. (Identical with PHSC 400)

403. Introduction to Pharmacy Practice (1) I Orientation to
career opportunities for pharmacists; medical terminology and
abbreviations.

404. Interviewing and Counseling Skills (1) I Basic communication
skills and thinking strategies needed for effective medication
history interviewing and patient counseling.

405. Patient Counseling and Medical Devices (1) II Proper use of
devices commonly employed to administer and monitor selected drug
therapies; how to instruct patients and health care providers in
selection and use of such devices.

407. Pharmacokinetics (4) I (Identical with PHSC 407) May be
convened with 507.

408a-408b. Pharmacokinetics Discussion (1-1) I II (Identical with
PHSC 408a-408b) May be convened with 508a-508b.

410. Research Options in Pharmacy (1) I Introduction to research
in the pharmacy disciplines, career opportunities in pharmacy
research; grants, contracts, and patents; confidentiality and
ethics.

411. Perspectives in Professional Practice (2) II Orientation to
professional practice issues; pharmacy practice site visitations.
Involves weekly discussions, site visits to various pharmacy
practices, and a written paper. Field trip. Open to majors only.

412. Nonprescription Drugs (2) I Presentation on nonprescription
drugs, remedies sold over-the-counter (O.T.C.), designed to guide
the pharmacist in providing professional advice to the self-
medicating public. P, 405.

413. Pharmacy Practice (2) II Application of pharmaceutical care
principles, pharmacy problem-solving skills, role playing and
documentation of pharmaceutical care. P, 412, PHSC 407, and PCOL
47lb.

414. Pharmacy Practice Lab (1) II Laboratory for PHPR 413

419. Parenteral Preparations (2) Principles and procedures in the
preparation, stability, and administration of parenteral
products. 1R, 3L. P, PHSC 307 or CR.

424. Antibiotics (2) I Principles of antibiotic chemotherapy and
the properties of the antibiotics employed in therapeutics. P,
MIC 205, PHSC 437b, PCOL 471b. (Identical with PHSC 424)

442. Professional Practice Management (3) I Management of
professional situations and the interaction among patients,
colleagues, and other health-care providers, with application to
institutional, community, and clinical pharmacy practice. P, 445.
May be convened with 542.

443. Pharmacy Laws (2) I Legal concepts covering professionalism,
negligence, liability, legal processes and semantics; pertinent
federal, state and local statutes and regulations.

445. Medication Use and the U.S. Health Care System (3) I An
overview of the U. S. health care system and the consumers,
providers, payers, and regulators that comprise it. The role of
pharmacy and pharmacists within the health care system will be
explored, including an examination of social, behavioral, and
economic factors associated with the prescribing, dispensing, and
use of medications. May be convened with 545.

447. Perspectives in Geriatrics Laboratory (1) II P, CR, 448.
(Identical with GERO 447 and N FS 447) May be convened with 547.

448. Perspectives in Geriatrics (2) II Multidisciplinary approach
to the health-care needs of the elderly, including medication
use, nutrition, health care agencies and roles of individual
health care professionals. Open to nonmajors. P, CR, 447 for
nonmajors. (Identical with GERO 448 and N FS 448) May be convened
with 548.

454. Drug Information and Drug Literature Evaluation (2) I Skills
and principles of drug information, biostatistics, and literature
evaluation needed to evaluate biomedical literature. P, 403.

461. Methodology in Pharmacy Research and Drug Literature
Evaluation (3) II Application of research design, statistical
methods, evaluation techniques, and ethical dimensions to
critically evaluate published literature, research reports and
proposals. P, STAT 263. May be convened with 561.

475a-475b-475c. Pharmacotherapeutics (6-6-8) 475a: II; 475b: I;
475c: II Common diseases that afflict humans. Their management
based on pharmacotherapeutic considerations of epidemiology,
etiology, diagnosis, pathophysiology, and prognosis. P, BIOC 460,
PSIO 480.

483. Perspectives of Cancer Care for Health Professionals (3) S
(Identical with NURS 483) May be convened with 583.

485. Advanced Clinical Pharmacokinetics (3) II Advanced
pharmacokinetic principles emphasizing the application of
mathematical relationships to therapeutic drug monitoring in
patient care situations. P, PHSC 407, 408a, or consult department
before enrolling. (Identical with PHSC 485) May be convened with
585.

487. Public Communication for Health Care Professionals (2) II
Advanced communication course which emphasizes public speaking
and critical analysis. It is intended for pharmacy students who
feel that public discourse will be an integral part of his or her
career. Classroom exercises emphasize realistic public
communication contexts for practicing pharmacists.

489. Clinical Pharmacotherapy of Mental Disorders (2) I A
multidisciplinary approach to clinical psychopharmacology,
therapeutics, and diagnosis of mental disorders for health
professionals. May be convened with 589.

495. Colloquium
a. Issues in Pharmacy (2) II

507. Pharmacokinetics (4) I (Identical with PHSC 507) May be
convened with 407.

508a-508b. Pharmacokinetics Discussion (1-1) I II (Identical with
PHSC 508a-508b) May be convened with 408a-408b.

511. Pharmacy Management (3) I History, organization and
administration of pharmaceutical services within the
institutional environment.

512. Advanced Pharmacy Management (3) II Application of
management principles to problem-solving and decision-making
techniques in the provision of pharmaceutical services within the
institutional environment. Field trips. Open to majors only. P,
511.

542. Professional Practice Management (3) I For description of
course topics, see 442. Graduate students will write either an
additional paper or proposal. May be convened with 442.

545. Medication Use and the U.S. Health Care System (3) I For a
description of course topics, see 445. Graduate students will
write either an additional paper or proposal. May be convened
with 445.

547. Perspectives in Geriatrics Laboratory (1) II P, CR, 448.
(Identical with GERO 547 and N FS 547) May be convened with 447.

548. Perspectives in Geriatrics (2) II For a description of
course topics, see 448. Graduate-level requirements include one
in-depth research paper on a single topic relevant to geriatric
care. Open to nonmajors. P, CR, 447 for nonmajors. (Identical
with GERO 548) May be convened with 448.

561. Methodology in Pharmacy Research and Drug Literature
Evaluation (3) II For description of course topics, see 461.
Graduate students will write either an additional paper or
proposal. May be convened with 461.

583. Perspectives of Cancer Care for Health Professionals (3) S
(Identical with NURS 583) May be convened with 483.

585. Advanced Clinical Pharmacokinetics (3) II For description of
course topics, see 485. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional paper. (Identical with PHSC 585) May be convened with
485.

589. Clinical Pharmacotherapy of Mental Disorders (2) I For a
description of course topics, see 489. Graduate-level
requirements include a research paper on a single topic
ofpsychopharmacology. May be convened with 489.

596. Seminar
a. Pharmacy Administration (1) [Rpt./5] I
b. Pharmacy Administration Research (1) [Rpt./5] II

611. Pharmacy and Its Environment (3) I Cultural, social,
behavioral, and organizational foundations of pharmacy, including
the development of the present state of practice.

612. Issues in Pharmacy Practice Research (3) II Survey of
research methodology for studying administrative, social and
behavioral aspects of health care and pharmacy practice; strategy
for selecting and modifying existing research tools for
particular purposes.

621. Pharmaceutical Marketing (3) I II Socioeconomic factors in
the development, production, and distribution of drugs.

635. Issues in Rural Health Care (3) II (Identical with NURS 635)

695. Colloquium
a. Research in Gerontology (1) I II (Identical with GERO 695a,
which is home)

800. Pharmacy Practice Project (1) II Individual pharmacy
practice research not related to a thesis or dissertation. Open
only to students enrolled in Doctor of Pharmacy program.

803. Pharmacy Clinical Clerkship (5) I II S P, available only
after completion of all required and elective didactic coursework
in the first 3 professional years.
a. Community Pharmacy Practice
b. Institutional Pharmacy Practice
c. Ambulatory Pharmacy Practice
d. Drug Information Practice
e. Adult Acute Care Pharmacy Practice

Note: 803a-e are six-week courses.

810. Pharmacy Clerkship (5) [Rpt./10 units] I II S P, available
only after completion of all required and elective didactic
coursework in the first three professional years.
a. Internal Medicine
b. Surgery
c. Pediatrics
d. Geriatrics/Gerontology
e. Outpatient Practice
f. Emergency Services
g. Acute Care
h. Clinical Pharmacokinetics
i. Psychopharmacy/Neurology
j. Nutrition Support
k. Specialty Institution

Note: 810a-k are six-week courses.

815. Pharmacy Subspecialty (5) [Rpt./10 units] I II S P,
available only after completion of all required and elective
didactic coursework in the first 3 professional years.
a. Hematology/Oncology
b. Cardiology
c. Pulmonary
d. Endocrine
e. GI/Renal
f. Ob/Gyn/Neonatal
g. Infectious Disease
h. Rheumatology/Immunology
i. Dermatology
j. Poison Information/Toxicology
k. Administrative
l. Research (Identical with PHSC 815l and PCOL 815l)

Note: 815a-l are six-week courses.

896. Seminar
a. Pharmacy Practice (1) II

 


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