The University of Arizona  1993-95 General Catalog

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Philosophy (PHIL)
Social Sciences Building, Room 213
(520) 621-3129

Professors Ronald D. Milo, Head, Julia Annas, Allen Buchanan,
Henry C. Byerly, Robert L. Caldwell (Emeritus), Joseph L. Cowan,
Robert Cummins, Joel Feinberg, Alvin I. Goldman, Jean Hampton,
Robert M. Harnish, Henning Jensen (Emeritus), Keith Lehrer, J.
Christopher Maloney, John L. Pollock, Francis V. Raab (Emeritus),
Holly M. Smith

Associate Professors Richard Healey, Joseph T. Tolliver

Assistant Professors Thomas Christiano, David Owen, Margaret
Reimer

Philosophy attempts to answer analytic and speculative questions
that perplex reflective people when they examine their basic
concepts, goals, and ideals. Some of these questions arise
naturally in the course of work in the various sciences and
humanities. Hence philosophy has a natural border with all other
academic disciplines, and lends itself to joint studies and
collaborations.

The Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy
degrees are available with a major in philosophy. The department
also encourages joint majors in such related fields as
psychology, political science, economics, and linguistics, among
others. Specialized minors in philosophy are available for
students planning careers in law or the health professions. For
details, students should consult the philosophy department's
undergraduate advisor.

The major: 30 units, including 344 and at least one course from
each of the following groups: (1) history of ancient philosophy;
(2) history of modern philosophy; (3) ethics and value theory;
(4) metaphysics and epistemology; (5) logic and language. For a
complete list of courses that satisfy each of these areas, please
see the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

The supporting minor should be chosen after consultation with the
undergraduate advisor.

The department participates in the honors program, offering
honors sections of its introductory courses, periodic honors
seminars, and the opportunity to conduct independent honors
research.

110. Logic and Critical Thinking (3) I II Designed to improve
ability to reason and think critically; emphasis on evaluating
and presenting arguments. Includes a basic introduction to logic
and scientific reasoning.

111. Introduction to Philosophy (3) I II Selected basic
philosophical areas and problems: knowledge, belief and truth;
the world and God; nature of persons; action and free will; the
good life; the ideal community.

113. Introduction to Moral and Social Philosophy (3) I II
Introduction to moral and political theory, and problems of
practical ethics. Readings from representative moral and social
philosophers.

121. Philosophical Foundations of Western Civilization: Justice
and Virtue (3) I II S Classical, medieval and modern moral and
political thought; theories of human good, natural rights,
political obligation, relation of individual and state, class
conflict.

122. Philosophical Foundations of Western Civilization: Mind,
Matter, and God (3) I II S Classical, medieval and modern
metaphysical questions: What am I--mind, body, or both? Is the
nature of the world ultimately physical? What is God? How may we
know?

123. Philosophical Foundations of Western Civilization: Science
and Inquiry (3) I II S Classical, medieval, and modern approaches
to science, mathematics and knowledge; philosophical problems
raised by discovery and change.

145. Science, Technology and Human Values (3) I Nature of
science, technology, pseudo-science, and their relation to
philosophy and culture; impact of science and technology on
society and its values and religion.

196. Proseminar
a. Topics in Philosophy (1)

202. Introduction to Symbolic Logic (3) Truth-functional logic
and quantification theory; deductive techniques and translation
into symbolic notation. (Identical with MATH 202)

213. Contemporary Moral Problems (3) Issues and arguments arising
in contemporary moral debates. Topics will vary but are likely to
include abortion, mercy killing, the nature of economic justice,
racism, sexism, pornography, animal rights, the death penalty,
terrorism, the morality of war, and nuclear deterrence.

233. Philosophy of Religion (3) I Nature of religion; existence
and nature of God; religion and meaning, values and knowledge.
(Identical with RELI 233)

238. Philosophy in Literature (3) I Philosophical analysis of
selected literary works.

245. Existential Problems (3) II 1993-94 Exploration of central
problems of the human condition, such as meaning of life; death;
self-deception; authenticity, integrity and responsibility; guilt
and shame; love and sexuality (Identical with RELI 245)

260. Ancient Philosophy (3) I Survey of Greek philosophy, from
the pre-Socratic philosophers through Plato and Aristotle to
post-Aristotelian philosophers. (Identical with CLAS 260)

262. Modern Philosophy (3) Survey of major 17th and 18th century
British and European philosophers, chosen from Descartes,
Spinoza, Leibnitz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.

263. From Hegel to Nietzsche:  Man and Society in 19th Century
Philosophy (3) Survey of influential 19th century philosophers,
including Hegel, Marx, J.S. Mill, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche.
Their views on the individual and society, and human nature.

305. Introduction to the Philosophy of Science (3) Basic issues
in the logic of science: scientific concepts and their meaning,
testing of hypotheses, explanation, measurement, role of
mathematics, truth versus convention, limits of science.

321. Medical Ethics (3) Ethical issues that arise in relation to
medicine and health care: abortion, euthanasia, the allocation of
scarce medical resources, socialized medicine, doctor-patient
confidentiality, paternalism, etc.

322. Business Ethics (3) II Selected ethical issues in business,
including corporate responsibility, preferential hiring and
reverse discrimination, advertising practices, environmental
responsibility.

344. Issues and Methods in Analytic Philosophy (3) Designed to
improve ability to think analytically, with emphasis  on analytic
methodology. Selected readings on the nature of mental states,
the analytic/synthetic distinction, personal identity, the
concept of knowledge and justified belief, the theory of
reference, and the distinction between science and pseudo-
science. Writing-Emphasis Course. P, satisfaction of the upper-
division writing-proficiency requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis
Courses" in the Academic Policies and Graduation Requirements
section of this catalog).

350. Minds, Brains, and Computers (3) [Rpt.] I An introduction to
cognitive science; current issues relating to minds as computers,
neuroscience, vision and language. (Identical with PSYC 350)

376. Introduction to the Philosophy of Language (3) I 1994-95 A
survey of basic issues in the philosophy of language. (Identical
with LING 376)

396H. Honors Proseminar (3) II

403. Foundations of Mathematics (3) II 1994-95 (Identical with
MATH 403) May be convened with 503.

410a-410b. History of Moral and Political Philosophy (3-3)
Reading and analysis of selected texts from the Greeks to the
present. 410a focuses on the history of moral philosophy and 410b
on the history of social and political philosophy. May be
convened with 510a-510b.

412. Readings in Greek Philosophy (3) [Rpt.] (Identical with GRK
412) May be convened with 512.

413a-413b. Symbolic Logic (3-3) 413a: Intermediate propositional
logic and quantificational theory., natural deduction, axiom
systems, elementary metatheorems, introduction notions of modal
logic, selected topics in philosophy of logic. 413b: Advanced
propositional logic and quantification theory; metatheorems on
consistency, independence, and completeness; set theory, number
theory, and modal theory; recursive function theory and Goedel's
incompleteness theorem. May be convened with 513a-513b.

414. Philosophical Logic (3) Introduction to modal logic;
problems of interpretation and application; extensions to such
areas as tense logic, epistemic logic, deontic logic. May be
convened with 514.

416. Philosophy of Mathematics (3) Problems at the foundations of
geometry and set theory. Logicism, formalism, and intuitionism.
Nominalism vs. realism. Epistemology of mathematics. May be
convened with 516.

419. Induction and Probability (3) Basic philosophical problems
concerning justification of induction, confirmation of scientific
hypotheses, and meaning of probability concepts. May be convened
with 519.

421. Philosophy of the Biological Sciences (3) Laws and models in
biology, structure of evolutionary theory, teleological
explanations, reductionism, sociobiology. (Identical with ECOL
421) May be convened with 521.

422. Linguistic Semantics and Lexicology (3) II 1994-95
(Identical with LING 422) May be convened with 522.

423a-423b. Philosophy of the Physical Sciences (3-3) 423a:
Theories and models. Measurement, experimentation, testing
hypotheses. Philosophical problems concerning explanation,
causation and laws of nature. 423b: Philosophical problems of
space, time and motion. Topics may include the nature of
geometrical knowledge, the philosophical impact of relativity
theory, absolute versus relative conceptions of space and time.
May be convened with 523a-523b.

424. Philosophy of Social Sciences (3) Theories, concepts, and
forms of understanding in the social sciences. Possible topics:
rational choice and decision at the individual and social levels;
democracy; and market mechanisms. P, one course in philosophy.
May be convened with 524.

425. Philosophical Issues in Feminism (3) Issues in philosophy
raised by feminism and recent studies of gender. Possible topics:
the source of gender differences; gender and the nature of
knowledge; gender differences in conceptions of morality;
feminist policial theories; the nature of mothering. May be
convened with 525.

430a-430b. Ethical Theory (3-3) 430a: Meta-ethics--meaning of
moral terms, relativism, subjectivism, ethics and science, social
contract theory. 430b: Normative ethics--Utilitarianism, egoism,
rights, natural law, justice, deontological duties,
blameworthiness and excuses. May be convened with 530a-530b.

433. Aesthetics (3) Classical and contemporary theories of art;
the esthetic experience, form and content, meaning, problems in
interpretation and criticism of works of art. May be convened
with 533.

434. Social and Political Philosophy (3) Fundamental concepts of
politics; leading social and political theories, such as
anarchism, social contract, Marxism. May be convened with 534.

436. Games and Decisions (3) Classical theory of subjective
probability, utility, and rational choice, with applications to
games theory and social welfare theory. P, MATH 119. May be
convened with 536.

438a-438b. Philosophy of Law (3-3) 438a: Nature and validity of
law; law and morality, judicial reasoning, law and liberty. 438b:
Problems about justice, compensation and contracts and/or
responsibility and punishment. (Identical with POL 438a-438b) May
be convened with 538a-538b.

440. Metaphysics (3) Topics include free will and determinism;
causation; personal identity; necessity and essence; truth,
realism and ontology. May be convened with 540.

441. Theory of Knowledge (3) Critical examination of some of the
major problems concerning evidence, justification, knowledge,
memory, perception and  induction. May be convened with 541.

442. Knowledge and Cognition (3) I Issues in philosophy and
psychology of knowledge, with emphasis on cognitive mechanisms.
Perception, memory, concepts, mental representation, problem-
solving, reasoning and rationality. P, two philosophy courses.
May be convened with 542.

443. Knowledge and Society (3) I II Social and interpersonal
processes affecting the acquisition and diffusion of knowledge.
Emphasis on philosophical perspectives, with interdisciplinary
borrowings. P, one philosophy course. May be convened with 543.

450. Philosophy of Mind (3) Topics include the nature of mental
states; the relation between mind and brain; and analysis of
perception, emotion, memory and action. May be convened with 550.

451. Philosophy and Psychology (3) Investigation of philosophical
issues arising from current work in psychology including
perception, reasoning, memory, motivation and action. May be
convened with 551.

455. Philosophy and Artificial Intelligence (3) Interdisciplinary
problems lying at the interface of philosophy and artificial
intelligence. May be convened with 555 (Identical with PSYC 455)

463. Philosophy of Language (3) Survey of basic issues in the
philosophy of language such as: speech acts, reference, meaning,
logical form. (Identical with LING 463) May be convened with 563.

465. Pragmatics (3) II Study of language use, its relationship to
language structure and context; topics such as speech acts,
presupposition, implication, performatives, conversations
(Identical with LING 465) May be convened with 565.

467. Frege and the Rise of Analytic Philosophy (3) The writings
of Frege on logic, language, and mathematics and their influence
on contemporary philosophical thought. May be convened with 567.

470. Greek Philosophy (3) [Rpt./1] Topics in Greek philosophy.
May be selected from the pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato,
Aristotle and post-Aristotelian philosophy. (Identical with CLAS
470). May be convened with 570.

471a-471b. Rationalism and Empiricism (3-3) 471a: Rationalists of
the 17th and 18th centuries: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, and
Kant. 471b: Empiricists of the 17th and 18th centuries: Locke,
Berkeley, Hume. May be convened with 571a-571b.

472a-472b. Ancient Philosophy (3-3) [Rpt.] 472a: A philosophical
introduction to the major works of Plato. 472b: A philosophical
introduction to the major works of Aristotle. (Identical with
CLAS 472a-472b) May be convened with 572a-572b.

473. Natural Language Processing (3) II 1994-95 (Identical with
LING 473) May be convened with 573.

503. Foundations of Mathematics (3) II 1994-95 (Identical with
MATH 503) May be convened with 403.

510a-510b. History of Moral and Political Philosophy (3-3) For a
description of course topics, see 410a-410b. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth research project on a central
theme or topic of the course. May be convened with 410a-410b.

512. Readings in Greek Philosophy (3) [Rpt.] (Identical with GRK
512) May be convened with 412.

513a-513b. Symbolic Logic (3-3) For a description of course
topics, see 413a-413b. Graduate-level requirements include an in-
depth research project on a central theme or topic of the course.
May be convened with 413a-413b.

514. Philosophical Logic (3) For a description of course topics,
see 414. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research
project on a central theme or topic of the course. May be
convened with 414.

516. Philosophy of Mathematics (3) For a description of course
topics, see 416. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth
research project on a central theme or topic of the course. May
be convened with 416.

519. Induction and Probability (3) For a description of course
topics, see 419. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth
research project on a central theme or topic of the course. May
be convened with 419.

521. Philosophy of the Biological Sciences (3) For a description
of course topics, see 421. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research paper on a central theme or topic of the
course. (Identical with ECOL 521) May be convened with 421.

522. Linguistic Semantics and Lexicology (3) II 1994-95
(Identical with LING 522) May be convened with 422.

523a-523b. Philosophy of the Physical Sciences (3-3) For a
description of course topics, see 423a-423b. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth research paper on a central
theme or topic of the course. May be convened with 423a-423b.

524. Philosophy of Social Sciences (3) For a description of
course topics, see 424. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research paper on a central theme or topic of the
course. P, one course in philosophy. May be convened with 424.

525. Philosophical Issues in Feminism (3) For a description of
course topics, see 425. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research project on a central theme or topic of this
course. May be convened with 425.

530a-530b. Ethical Theory (3-3) For a description of course
topics, see 430a-430b. Graduate-level requirements include an in-
depth research paper on a central theme or topic of the course.
May be convened with 430a-430b.

533. Aesthetics (3) For a description of course topics, see 433.
Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research project
on a central theme or topic of the course. May be convened with
433.

534. Social and Political Philosophy (3) For a description of
course topics, see 434. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research project on a central theme or topic of the
course. May be convened with 434.

536. Games and Decisions (3) For a description of course topics,
see 436. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research
project on a central theme or topic of the course. P, MATH 119.
May be convened with 436.

538a-538b. Philosophy of Law (3-3) For a description of course
topics, see 438a-438b. Graduate-level requirements include an in-
depth research project on a central theme or topic of the course.
(Identical with POL 538a-538b) May be convened with 438a-438b.

540. Metaphysics (3) For a description of course topics, see 440.
Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research project
on a central theme or topic of the course. May be convened with
440.

541. Theory of Knowledge (3) For a description of course topics,
see 441. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research
paper on a central theme or topic of the course. May be convened
with 541.

542. Knowledge and Cognition (3) I For a description of course
topics, see 442. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth
research paper on a central theme or topic of the course. May be
convened with 442.

543. Knowledge and Society (3) I II For a description of course
topics, see 443. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth
research paper on a central theme or topic of the course. May be
convened with 443.

550. Philosophy of Mind (3) For a description of course topics,
see 450. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research
paper on a central theme or topic of the course. May be convened
with 450.

551. Philosophy and Psychology (3) For a description of course
topics, see 451. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth
research paper on a central theme or topic of the course. May be
convened with 451.

555. Philosophy and Artificial Intelligence (3) For a description
of course topics, see 455. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research paper on a central theme or topic of the
course. (Identical with PSYC 555) May be convened with 455.

563. Philosophy of Language (3) For a description of course
topics, see 463. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth
research paper on a central theme or topic of the course.
(Identical with LING 563) May be convened with 463.

564. Formal Semantics (3) I (Identical with LING 564)

565. Pragmatics (3) II For a description of course topics, see
465. Graduate-level requirements include a greater number of
assignments and a higher level of performance. (Identical with
LING 565) May be convened with 465.

567. Frege and the Rise of Analytic Philosophy (3) For a
description of course topics, see 467. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth research paper on a central
theme or topic of the course. May be convened with 467.

570. Greek Philosophy (3) [Rpt./1] For a description of course
topics, see 470. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth
research paper on a central theme or topic of the course.
(Identical with CLAS 570) May be convened with 470.

571a-571b. Rationalism and Empiricism (3-3) For a description of
course topics, see 471a-471b. Graduate-level requirements include
an in-depth research paper on a central theme or topic of the
course. May be convened with 471a-471b.

572a-572b. Ancient Philosophy (3-3) [Rpt.] For a description of
course topics, see 472a-472b. Graduate-level requirements include
an in-depth research paper on a central theme or topic of the
course. (Identical with CLAS 572a-572b) May be convened with
472a-472b.

573. Natural Language Processing (3) II 1994-95 (Identical with
LING 573) May be convened with 473.

596. Seminar
a. Ethics (3) [Rpt./2]
b. Metaphysics (3) [Rpt./2]
c. Epistemology (3) [Rpt./2]
f. Social and Political Philosophy (3) [Rpt./2]
g. Philosophy of Law (3) [Rpt./2] (Identical with LAW 596g)
h. Philosophy of Physical Science (3) [Rpt./2] (Identical with
PHYS 596h)
k. Philosophy of Mind (3) [Rpt./2]
l. Philosophy of Language (3) [Rpt./2]
p. History of Philosophy: Ancient (3) [Rpt./2]
q. History of Philosophy: Recent (3) [Rpt./2]
v. Philosophy and Cognitive Science (3) [Rpt./2]

 


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