The University of Arizona  1993-95 General Catalog

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Pharmacology (PHCL)
College of Medicine, Room 5103A
(520) 626-7218

(Department, College of Medicine)

Professors John D. Palmer, Acting Head, David S. Alberts
(Internal Medicine), H. Vasken Aposhian (Molecular and Cellular
Biology), Klaus Brendel, Rubin Bressler (Internal Medicine),
Burnell R. Brown, Jr. (Anesthesiology), Dean E. Carter
(Pharmacology and Toxicology), Thomas P. Davis, A. Jay Gandolfi
(Anesthesiology, Pharmacology and Toxicology), Marilyn J.
Halonen, Ryan J. Huxtable, David G. Johnson (Internal Medicine),
David L. Kreulen (Physiology), Eugene Morkin (Internal Medicine,
Physiology), Frank Porreca, Garth Powis, Charles W. Putnam
(Surgery), William R. Roeske (Internal Medicine), I. Glenn Sipes
(Anesthesiology, Pharmacology and Toxicology), Henry I. Yamamura
(Biochemistry, Psychiatry)

Associate Professors John W. Bloom, Robert T. Dorr (Internal
Medicine), Timothy Fagan (Internal Medicine), Laurel A. Fisher,
Douglas F. Larson (Surgery), Thomas J. Lindell (Molecular and
Cellular Biology)

Assistant Professors Josephine Lai, Ronald Lynch (Physiology),
Andrea J. Yool (Physiology)

Instructor Alan D. Barreuther

Research Professor Richard Herman

Research Associate Professor Ronald J. Lukas, Thomas L. Smith

Research Assistant Professor R. K. Rao

Research Lecturer John C. Gilkey (Arizona Research Lab)

Pharmacology is a broad discipline involving the investigation of
the actions of drugs and chemicals upon living material at all
levels of organization. The discipline occupies an important
interface between the basic medical sciences and the clinical
sciences, drawing strongly upon the former for its contribution
to the latter. Research in pharmacology utilizes all appropriate
techniques of modern biology from the molecular to the clinical
levels. In the health professions, pharmacologic knowledge is
applied to the diagnosis, prevention, cure or relief of symptoms
of disease, and in the promotion of optimal health. The basic
pharmacologic principles are emphasized in both medical and
graduate student teaching. This will permit the student to
develop techniques of problem solving to keep abreast of advances
in pharmacology through his/her professional career.

In conjunction with other departments in the University, the
department participates in an interdisciplinary graduate program
leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree in pharmacology and
toxicology. The department also offers a program of instruction
leading to the Master of Science degree with a major in
pharmacology. See the Graduate Interdisciplinary Program in
Pharmacology and Toxicology.

495. Colloquium
y. Introduction to the Neurosciences I (2) 1993-94 P, Consult
department before enrolling. (Identical with MED 495y, which is
home) May be convened with 595y.
z. Introduction to the Neurosciences II (2) 1993-94 P, 495y or
consult department before enrolling. (Identical with MED 495z,
which is home) May be convened with 595z.

501. The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics (6) II Actions of
chemical agents upon living material at all levels of
organization, with emphasis on mechanisms of action of prototype
drugs; foundation for a rational approach to human therapeutics
and toxicology. P, PSIO 580, 581 and graduate course equivalent
to BIOC 562a or 501. (Identical with TOX 501)

520. Clinical Pharmacology (2) I Effects of drugs on natural
history of disease; drug-drug interactions; drug testing designs;
drug abuse; drug literature evaluation; aspects of clinical
toxicology. P, 501.

550. Drug Disposition and Metabolism (2) II Principles of
absorption, distribution and excretion of drugs, with emphasis on
mechanisms of drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics. P, BIOC 462a,
462b, or 501. (Identical with TOX 550)

551. Molecular Biology of Pharmacological Agents (3) I 1993-94 
Molecular mechanism of drugs and toxins at the cellular and
subcellular levels, including effects on control mechanisms,
cell-cell interactions, organelles, and nucleic acid and protein
synthesis. P, BIOC 462a, 462b, or 501, and PHCL 620. (Identical
with TOX 551)

554. Cardiovascular Pharmacology (3) I Modern theories of
mechanism of action of cardiovascular drugs, therapy of
cardiovascular disease. P, 501, PSIO 580, BIOC 501. Huxtable

576. Environmental Toxicology (3) I (Identical with TOX 576)

582. Immunotoxicology (2) I (Identical with TOX 582)

586a-586b. Introduction to Pharmacology and Toxicology Research
(1-1) Introduction to basic research techniques in pharmacology
and toxicology through supervised laboratory rotations; student-
initiated and faculty-structured lab. exercises in modern 
pharmacological and toxicological techniques. P, CR, BIOC 562a,
PHCL 620.

595. Colloquium
y. Introduction to the Neurosciences I (2) 1993-94 P, Consult
department before enrolling. (Identical with MED 595y, which is
home) May be convened with 495y.
z. Introduction to the Neurosciences II (2) 1993-94 P, 595y or
consult department before enrolling. (Identical with MED 595z,
which is home) May be convened with 495z.

596. Seminar
a. Advanced Graduate Research (1 to 3) [Rpt./3] I II P, 561b.
(Identical with PCOL 596a)

601. Analytical Instrumentation and Techniques (4) I (Identical
with TOX 601)

602a-602b. Biotoxicology (3-1) (Identical with TOX 602a-602b)

605. Human Neuroscience (6) I II (Identical with ANAT 605)

620. Principles of Pharmacology (3) I Basic principles of the
actions of drugs and of intercellular communication; drug-
receptor theory; principles of laboratory investigation in
pharmacology and toxicology; historical and philosophical
foundations of pharmacology and toxicology. (Identical with PCOL
620 and TOX 620)

653. Neuropharmacology (3-4) II (Identical with PCOL 653)

670. Principles of Perfusion Techniques I (3) I An introduction
to basic extracorporeal techniques through discussion of blood
propelling devices, heat transfer, gas transfer, bio-materials,
and perfusion pharmacology. P, CR 671, acceptance as degree
graduate student. (Identical with SURG 670)

671. Perfusion Technology Laboratory (1) I An introduction to
basic extracorporeal systems. P, acceptance as degree graduate
student. (Identical with SURG 671)

672. Principles of Perfusion Techniques II (2) I Introduction to
basic extracorporeal techniques through discussion of blood
propelling devices, heat transfer, gas transfer, bio-materials
and perfusion pharmacology. P, acceptance as degree track
graduate (Identical with SURG 672)

691. Preceptorship
l. Perfusion Science (3) [Rpt./9 units] I II S P, admission into
circulatory sciences option within pharmacology.

695. Colloquium
a. Cellular/Molecular Pharmacology (1-3) [Rpt./4 units] I II P,
BIOC 462a-462b; 568a-568b and/or PHCL 551.

696. Seminar
a. Student Research (1) [Rpt./4] II (Identical with PCOL 696a and
TOX 696a)

800. Research (1-6)

801. The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics (6) II

805. Human Neuroscience (6) I II (Identical with ANAT 805)

815. Subspecialty
a. Clinical Pharmacology (3-6) P, 801, and College of Medicine
registration.

891. Preceptorship
a. Pharmacology (3-12) [Rpt./12 units]
l. Perfusion Science (3) [Rpt./9 units] I II S (Identical with
SURG 891l)

 


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