The University of Arizona  1993-95 General Catalog

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Military Science, Naval Science and Military Aerospace Studies
(ML S/NS/ML A) 

Military science (Army), naval science (Navy and Marine Corps)
and aerospace studies (Air Force) are open to male and female
students seeking a commission. ROTC courses can be counted as
elective credit toward graduation in most academic majors. Lower-
division courses carry no service commitment. Veterans may
receive credit for the first two years of the four-year ROTC
program. Textbooks and uniforms are provided by the departments.
For further information about the four-year ROTC programs, the
special two-year ROTC programs, entry requirements for upper-
division courses, and ROTC scholarships, see the catalog section
on School of Military Science, Naval Science and Aerospace
Studies under General Divisions of the University or contact the
department.

Military Science (ML S)
South Hall, Room 101
(520) 621-1609

Professor Michael P. Merz, Head

Assistant Professor John Russo

Instructors John Benson, David Bryant, Rene Olivari, William
Tackenberg

100. Introduction to Leadership (3) I Organization of the Army;
principles and techniques of applied leadership; customs,
traditions and military courtesy; basic marksmanship; first aid,
land navigation; small-unit tactics; practicum. 2R, 1L. Course is
open to all registered students.

101. Leadership Principles (3) II Organization of the Army;
principles and techniques of applied leadership; customs,
traditions and military courtesy; basic marksmanship; first aid,
land navigation; small-unit tactics; practicum. 2R, 1L. Course is
open to all registered students.

110. Physical Fitness Training (1) [Rpt./2 units] I II Activity
course based on the Army physical fitness training program. 3L.

200. Army Composition/Functions and Leadership Development I (3)
Military staff organization and operation; procedures and conduct
of military planning; principles of war through historical
examples; leadership development for today and tomorrow in small
units and organizations; practicum. 2R, 1L. Open to all
registered students.

201. Army Composition/Functions and Leadership Development II (3)
Continues the development of leadership training for the
individual in small unit levels; orientation to Soviet Military
power, practical experiences in land navigation, first aid and
rifle marksmanship. 2R, 1L. Open to all registered students.

210. Tactics (2) [Rpt./4 units] I II GRD Development of tactical
planning skills and small unit operations.

300. Small Unit Leadership I (3) Topographical map
interpretation; fundamentals of small-unit operations;
communication media, motivation and behavior in the military
environment; military planning and execution; practicum. 3R, 1L.
Consult department before enrolling.

301. Small Unit Leadership II (3) Topographical map
interpretation; fundamentals of small-unit operations;
communication media, motivation and behavior in the military
environment; military planning and execution; practicum. 3R, 1L.
Consult department before enrolling.

310. Army ROTC Advanced Camp (4) S Six-week summer camp at Ft.
Lewis, Washington, required for commissioning as an officer in
U.S. Army. Open only to Advanced Course Army ROTC cadets.

400. Officership I (3) Development of skills required to function
as a manager; motivation and behavior in a military environment;
highlights personal integrity, honor and professional ethics;
military legal system; unit management; practicum. 3R, 1L.
Consult department before enrolling.

401. Officership II (3) Development of skills required to
function as a manager; motivation and behavior in a military
environment; highlights personal integrity, honor and
professional ethics; military legal system; unit management;
practicum. 3R, 1L. Consult department before enrolling.

496. Seminar
a. Advanced Officership (3) [Rpt./1] I II Consult department
before enrolling

Naval Science (NS)
South Hall, Room 109
(520) 621-1281

Professor R. F. Walters, Head

Associate Professor V. W. Converse

Assistant Professors Larry Alexander, Jim Lelio, Ellen Martin,
Tim Minnehan, Tom Southard

Instructors Tim Acosta, Victor Bagley

100a-100b. Naval Laboratory I (1-1) I II Various topics such as
drill and ceremonies, physical fitness, cruise preparation, sail
training, safety awareness, personal finances, and applied
exercises in naval ship systems, navigation, naval operations,
naval administration, and military justice. 3L.

101. Introduction to Naval Science (3) I Introduction to the
naval profession and to concepts of seapower, with emphasis on
mission, organization, and warfare components of the Navy and
Marine Corps; naval courtesy and customs, military justice,
shipboard damage control and safety.

102. Naval Ship Systems I: Engineering (3) II Ship
characteristics and types including ship design, hydrodynamic
forces, stability, compartmentation, propulsion, electrical and
auxiliary systems, interior communications, ship control, and
damage control; basic concepts of the theory and design of steam,
gas turbine, and nuclear propulsion.

200a-200b. Naval Laboratory II (1-1) I II Various topics such as
drill and ceremonies, physical fitness, cruise preparation, sail
training, safety awareness, personal finances, and applied
exercises in naval ship systems, navigation, naval operations,
naval administration, and military justice. 3L.

201. Naval Ship Systems: Weapons (3) I Theory and employment of
weapons systems, the processes of detection, evaluation, threat
analysis, selection, delivery, and guidance. Physical aspects of
radar and underwater sound. P, N S 102.

202. Seapower and Maritime Affairs (3) II U.S. Naval history from
the American Revolution to the present. Discussion of the
theories of Mahan, political issues of merchant marine  commerce,
and a comparison of U.S. and Soviet naval strategies.

300a-300b. Naval Laboratory III (1-1) I II Various topics such as
drill and ceremonies, physical fitness, cruise preparation, sail
training, safety awareness, personal finances, and applied 
exercises in naval ship systems, navigation, naval operations,
naval administration, and military justice. 3L.

301. Navigation and Naval Operations I (3) I Theory, principles,
and procedures of navigation. Students learn piloting navigation
including the use of charts, visual and electronic aids, the
theory and operation of magnetic and gyro compasses, and
celestial navigation.

302. Navigation and Naval Operations II (3) II International and
inland rules of the road, relative-motion vector-analysis,
formation tactics, and ship employment. Introduction to naval
operations and ship handling. P, N S 301

310. Evolution of Warfare (3) I The development of warfare to
present, focusing on theorists, strategists, tacticians, and
technological developments. Student acquires sense of strategy
and impact of precedent on military actions.

400a-400b. Naval Laboratory IV (1-1) [Rpt./1] I II Various topics
such as drill and ceremonies, physical fitness, cruise 
preparation, sail training, safety awareness, personal finances,
and applied  exercises in naval ship systems, navigation, naval
operations, naval administration, and military justice. 3L.

401. Leadership and Management I (2) I Organizational behavior
and management in the context of the naval  organization. A
survey of management functions of planning, organizing, and
controlling; and introduction to individual and group behavior in
organizations; motivation and leadership.

402. Leadership Management II (2) II Naval officer
responsibilities in naval administration: counseling methods,
military justice administration, naval human resources
management, directives and correspondence, naval personnel
administration, material management and maintenance. P, N S 401
or MAP 305.

410. Amphibious Warfare (3) II Historical survey of the
development of amphibious doctrine and amphibious operations,
with emphasis on the evolution of amphibious warfare in the 20th
century; present day potential and limitations on amphibious
operations, including the rapid deployment force concept.

Military Aerospace Studies (ML A)
South Hall, Room 104
(520) 621-3521

Professor Edward D. Harrow, Jr.

Assistant Professors James E. Hartman, Timothy J. Mills, Mickey
D. Teague

100a-100b. Air Force Today (2-2) First Year GMC* Survey of the
doctrine, mission, and organization of the U.S.A.F.; U.S.
strategic offensive and defensive forces; U.S. general purpose
and aerospace support forces. 1R, 1L. 100a is not prerequisite to
100b.

200a-200b. History of Aviation* (2-2) Second Year GMC* Survey of
the development of aviation from the advent of the air age to the
present, with emphasis on military aviation and its relationship
with political and economic aspects of historical world
situations. 1R, 1L. 200a is not prerequisite to 200b.

300a-300b. Third Year POC**, Leadership and Management (3-3)
Theory and application of leadership and management, with
emphasis on human relations, motivation, communication for
managers, organizational behavior and Total Quality Management
(TQM) principles and processes. 3R, 1L. Consult department before
enrolling.

400a-400b. Fourth Year POC**, American Defense Policy (3-3)
Critical analysis of various aspects of the military in American
society and its application and effects on the world political
and economic environment. 3R, 1L. Consult department before
enrolling.

*General Military Course

**Professional Officer Course

 


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