The University of Arizona  1993-95 General Catalog

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Music (MUS/MUSI)
Music Building, Room 109
(520) 621-1655

Professors Dorothy Payne Director, James R. Anthony (Emeritus),
John Bloom (Emeritus), John Boe, Andrew Buchhauser (Emeritus),
Edna Church (Emerita), Gary D. Cook, Larry J. Day, Gordon
Epperson (Emeritus), Billie R. Erlings, Thomas Ervin, Richard
Faith (Emeritus), John R. Ferrell, Gregg I. Hanson, O. M.
Hartsell (Emeritus), Jeffrey Haskell, Steven Hedden, Robert Hull
(Emeritus), Henry Johnson (Emeritus), Roy A. Johnson, Jean-Louis
Kashy, Jack Lee (Emeritus), Robert McBride (Emeritus), Theodora
M. McMillan (Emerita), Elizabeth Mosher, Robert Muczynski
(Emeritus), Edward W. Murphy, James P. O'Brien, Marguerite Ough
(Emerita), Leonard A. Pearlman, Richard E. Peters (Emeritus),
Jocelyn Reiter, Charles Roe, Anita Sammarco (Emerita), Anna Mae
Sharp (

Maurice Skones (Emeritus)R. Warren Sutherland, Andor Toth,
Nicholas L. Zumbro

Associate Professors Daniel I. Asia, William Dietz, Elizabeth
Thompson Ervin, Paula Fan, Nancy Ferguson, Nohema Fernandez, John
R. Fitch, Grayson Hirst, Keith M. Johnson, Jerry Kirkbride, Josef
Knott, Timothy Kolosick, Carrol McLaughlin, Rodney M. Mercado,
Richard Obregon, Thomas Patterson, Faye Robinson, Jeffrey
Showell, Rex Woods

Assistant Professors John T. Brobeck, Enrique Feldman, Patrick
Neher, Gary B. Wilson

The School of Music, a division of the Faculty of Fine Arts,
offers course work leading to the following degrees: Bachelor of
Music with majors in jazz studies, music education, performance,
and composition; Bachelor of Arts in Music; Master of Music;
Doctor of Musical Arts; and Doctor of Philosophy. The School of
Music participates with the Committee on Dance in providing
course work for the drama-musical theatre major offered by the
Department of Drama for the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. The
school is a member of the National Association of Schools of
Music, and the requirements for entrance and graduation as set
forth in this catalog are in accordance with the published
standards of that association.

Entrance Requirements: Entrance examinations in musicianship and
the major performance area are required. All freshmen and
transfer music majors (except piano and organ performance majors)
must audition for placement in class or group piano instruction.
These courses should be taken concurrently with MUS 120a-120b and
220a-220b. Students desiring the B.A. in Music or the B.M. with a
major other than performance must meet the requirements for
registration in MUSI 181 in their major performance area. B.M.
students majoring in performance must meet the requirements for
registration in MUSI 185 in their major performance area.
Admission to the 181 level requires minimum performance skill
equivalent to at least two years of recent private study and/or
four years of recent membership in school or community
organizations. Admission to the MUSI 185 level requires a minimum
of five years of private study or ensemble/solo experience
resulting in sufficient advancement that the student shows
promise of being at a professional level after completion of four
years of undergraduate study. Detailed information regarding
entrance and degree requirements is available from the Director
of the School of Music.

Residency Requirements: Majors must complete a minimum number of
units of University credit, as specified in the following
schedule: performance--21 units in the major; jazz studies--22
units in the major; music education--19 units in the major, plus
TTE 493b; and composition--23 units in the major.

Ensemble Participation: All students enrolled in performance
studies are required to participate in a conducted ensemble (MUS
200, 400, 500) unless excused by the Director of the School of
Music. (Accompanying or coached ensembles may fulfill this
requirement for keyboard majors per the degree requirements.)

Special Regulations: Credit for private or group instruction is
granted only to students who are eligible to register for regular
University credit. Students registered for performance studies
may be assigned to private or group instruction and required to
attend master classes and recitals as arranged by the instructor.
Students may, at the discretion of their major adviser or
performance instructor, be required to register for MUS 201 and
to appear in and attend performances as arranged by their
instructor. Lessons missed by the student will not be rescheduled
unless the instructor has been notified by the student 24 hours
before the regular time of the lesson. Lessons missed by the
instructor will be rescheduled within the semester. Lessons
falling on a legal holiday will not be rescheduled.

Degree Programs: The curricula for all music programs include a
common core of studies which is intended to coordinate all
aspects of musical training in a program of comprehensive
musicianship.

The music minor for B.A., B.F.A., or B.S. degree: A minimum of 20
units, or more as specified by the major area. A music minor
advisor in the School of Music should be contacted for further
information or assistance with course selection.

The teaching minor for secondary education: 25 units, including
MUS 110a-110b, 120a-120b, 130a-130b, 338m, 370, 371, 2 units of
conducted ensemble, 4 units of MUSI 181 or above.

Bachelor of Music

Basic Requirements: All candidates for the B.M. must complete the
following basic requirements: (1) general education requirements,
as outlined under the Bachelor of Music degree in the Faculty of
Fine Arts section of this catalog. (2) MUS 110a-110b, 120a-120b,
130a-130b, 210a-210b (except for guitar performance majors), MUS
220a-220b, 320, 330a-330b.  Keyboard majors are exempted from
110a-110b and 210a-210b. (3) One of the majors outlined below.
All B.M. students are required to take at least one 3-unit course
focusing specifically on gender, race, ethnicity or non-Western
civilization. This course can be part of the major, general
education, or elective course work and must be approved by a
departmental advisor.

First Year Curriculum: Music majors should enroll, in
consultation with an academic advisor, in the following courses
during the freshman year: MUS 110a-110b (except keyboard majors),
120a-120b, 130a-130b, one unit of MUS 200 each semester, two to
four units per semester in the major instrument or voice, ENGL
101-102, and six units of general education requirements as
outlined under the Bachelor of Music in the Faculty of Fine Arts
section of the catalog.

The MAJOR IN PERFORMANCE includes the following five areas of
specialization:

Keyboard instrument--major instrument, 31 units (minimum entrance
level: MUSI 185. Graduation requirement: 7 units of MUSI 485);
ensemble*: one semester of conducted, four semesters of
accompanying, two semesters of coached, one semester of elective;
MUS 370, 410a-410b, 420a-420b, 421, 426a-426b, and a senior
recital (MUS 425). Minimum total units: 131.

String instrument/harp--major instrument, 31 units (minimum
entrance level: MUSI 185. Graduation requirement: seven units of
MUSI 485); ensemble*: eight semesters of conducted, six semesters
of coached; MUS 370, 410a, 421; three units of music electives; a
senior recital (MUS 425). At least four units of the general
studies courses or music electives must be at the upper-division
level. Minimum total units: 130/129.

Guitar--major instrument, 31 units (minimum entrance level: MUSI
185. Graduation requirement: seven units of MUSI 485) and a
senior recital (MUS 425) of one unit; ensemble*; one semester of
conducted, seven semesters of guitar ensemble, MUS 370, 410a-
410b, 420a-420b, 424. Minimum total units: 128.

Voice--voice, 31 units (minimum entrance level: MUSI 185.
Graduation requirement: seven units of MUSI 485); ensemble*:
eight semesters of conducted; four units of piano beyond the
general requirement listed above; MUS 211a-211b, 205/405 (2
units), 370, four units of music electives; a senior recital (MUS
425); 16 units of foreign language. At least nine units of the
general studies courses or music electives must be at the upper-
division level. Minimum total units: 130.

Wind Instrument or Percussion--major instrument, 32 units
(minimum entrance level: MUSI 185. Graduation requirement: eight
units of MUSI 485); ensemble*: eight semesters of conducted
(minimum: three orchestra, three band, two jazz--if appropriate
instrument), six semesters of coached; MUS 370, 410a, 421, four
units of music electives; a senior recital (MUS 425). At least
four units of the general studies courses of music electives must
be at the upper-division level. Minimum total units: 130.

The MAJOR IN JAZZ STUDIES: Major instrument, 16 units of two
units/semester (minimum entrance level: MUSI 181. Graduation
requirement: four units of MUSI 385); minor instrument or voice,
six units of one unit/semester; ensemble*: six semesters of MUS
200r/400r, four semesters of MUS 200/400 (excluding MUS
200r/400r), two semesters of 201e/401e, two semesters of coached
ensemble electives; MUS 302, 321a-321b, 331, 422, 6 units of
music electives. At least six units of the general studies course
or music electives must be at the upper-division level. Minimum
total units: 128.

The MAJOR IN MUSIC EDUCATION (Voice): seven semesters of two
units per semester (minimum entrance level: MUSI 181. Graduation
requirement: two units of MUSI 285 and a half recital); keyboard:
MUS 310a-310b, MUSI 181P; ensemble*: seven semesters of
conducted; MUS 153, 211a-211b, 250, 350a or 350b, 351a or 351b,
one unit of 352, 370, 450, 451; EDUC 350; ED P 310; LRC 435,
493b; TTE 300, 338m, 493b. Minimum total units: 132.

The MAJOR IN MUSIC EDUCATION (Instrumental): Major instrument:
seven semesters of 2 units per semester (minimum entrance level:
MUSI 181. Graduation requirement: 2 units of MUSI 285 and a half
recital); ensemble*: seven semesters of conducted (including one
unit of MUS 200r, if appropriate instrument), one semester of
coached; MUS 111, 153, 250, 350a-350b, 351a-351b, 352, 370, 371,
421, 439, 450; EDUC 350; ED P 310; LRC 435, 493b; TTE 300, 338m,
493b. Minimum total units: 133.

All Music Education Majors: After completion of MUS 250, all
music education majors must pass a designated admission test, and
should have a 2.8 grade-point average in all music courses other
than ensembles and a 2.5 grade-point average in all courses
before being admitted to the junior level Teacher Education
Program. The Music Education Advisory Review (MEAR) and
professional music education courses--methods, conducting, and
techniques--must be completed before student teaching.

The MAJOR IN COMPOSITION: Major instrument or voice, seven
semesters of 2 units/semester (minimum entrance level: 181.
Graduation requirement: 6 units of 185); ensemble*: six semesters
of conducted, two semesters of coached; MUS 240 (6 units), 340 (6
units), 370, 420a-420b, 421, 425, 440 (6 units), 441, 442;
additional general academic electives. Minimum total units: 132.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MUSIC

This degree program is designed for students interested in music
history who may wish to pursue a graduate degree in musicology or
for those whose interest in music is essentially avocational.

The major: In addition to the general education requirements, as
described under the Bachelor of Arts in the College of Arts and
Sciences section of this catalog, the following course work is
required: 110a-110b, 120a-120b, 130a-130b, 210a-210b, 220a-220b,
320, 330a-330b, 420a-420b; three units of music electives. The
student also must complete six semesters of work in a major
instrument or voice (minimum entrance level: MUSI 181. Graduation
requirement: two units of MUSI 185) and four semesters of
ensemble* (including two semesters of Collegium Musicum). A 20-
unit minor is also required (see Faculty of Fine Arts section of
this catalog). To meet the general education requirements in a
foreign language, German or French is recommended. Minimum total
units: 128.

*In all music degrees the term "semester" in the ensemble
requirement indicates that the student is required to register
for the number of successive semesters of ensemble listed.

100. Basic Musicianship (3) I II CDT Introduction to the
rudiments of musical notation, harmony, rhythm, and melody.

101a-101b. Exploring Music through Piano for General Students (3-
1) 101a: Introduces and develops basic concepts of music as a
creative process in studying piano. Includes music fundamentals,
beginning improvisation, playing by ear, chording to melodies,
music reading, and repertory. 101b: [Rpt./2] Studying piano
pieces and music basics. P, 101a or by audition, interview.

102a-102b. Class Guitar for General College Students(1-1) 102a:
Introduction to basic guitar playing techniques for the general
college student, with emphasis on literature and styles of
playing of current interest to students. 102b: Development of
guitar skills including sightreading, accompanying, tone
production and other classical techniques. 102a and 102b are
offered both semesters.

103. Class Voice for General College Students (2) [Rpt.]
Practical training in singing, with emphasis on basic skills of
breathing, tone and diction; repertory to include folk, current,
and classic songs in English.

105. Operatic Stage Training (1) I [Rpt./2] An introduction to
the fundamentals of movement, acting and stage terminology as
related to the performance of opera and operetta. Emphasis on
practical experience, including in-class study of selected
operatic scenes.

107. Survey of Music I (3) I II Introductory course which
concentrates on developing perceptual skills through a study of
many types of music, with emphasis on Western art music of the
18th, 19th and 20th centuries, as well as popular and ethnic
music.

108. Survey of Music II (3) I II Continuation of 107, with
emphasis on Western art music, particularly that of the Medieval
through the Baroque era, and the music of other cultures. 107 is
not prerequisite to 108.

110a-110b. Piano Class I (1-1) Introductory development of basic
keyboard musicianship and technique through activities including
playing by ear, improvising, harmonizing, transposing. Open to
music majors and minors only. P, CR, 102a-102b.

111. Voice Class (1) [Rpt.] Beginning instruction; introduction
and development of basic skills, breathing, diction, tone,
rhythm, sight-singing, repertory songs in English; practical
training in singing without specialization. Open to music majors
and minors only.

120a-120b. Musical Skills and Structure I (3-3) CDT Study of
rhythm, melody, harmony, texture, timbre, and form in music.
Students work in analysis, composition, music reading, ear
training, conducting and class performance. P, 100.

130a-130b. Introduction to Music Literature (2-2) CDT Survey of
music literature, with emphasis on structure, period, and style.
Open to music majors and minors only. P, CR, 120a-120b.

153. Percussion Instruments Class (1) II Class instruction in all
percussion instruments, including materials and procedures for
teaching these instruments in the schools.

210a-210b. Piano Class II (1-1) Continuation of 110b, with
additional sight-reading, score-reading, and accompanying. Open
to MUS majors and minors only. P, 110b.

211a-211b. Diction for Singers (2-2) Training in diction for
singers in English, French, German, Italian, Spanish and
ecclesiastical Latin.

220a-220b. Musical Skills and Structure II (3-3) CDT Continuation
of 120a-120b, dealing with music from the late medieval period
through early 20th-century art music in chronological order. 2R,
3L. P, 120b.

250. Introduction to Music Education (3) I Observation of and
practical field experience in public schools; video-taped class
presentations. Field trips. Open to music majors only.

302. Recording Studio Production (3) I II Recording studio
procedures including the recording chain and pre-post and actual
recording production techniques. P, with permission of the School
of Music. (Identical with M AR 302)

310a-310b. Functional Piano for Music Education Majors (1-1)
310a: Development of functional piano skills needed for public-
school music teaching, with emphasis on improvising, harmonizing,
transposing, and accompanying.  310b: Continuation of 310a with
materials of increasing difficulty; open-score part-reading and
rehearsal techniques. P, 210b.

320. Form and Structure in 20th-Century Music (3) I Intensive
analysis of posttonal music, beginning with serial works of
Schoenberg through very recent compositions by major composers.
Open to music majors and minors only. P, 220b.

321a-321b. Jazz Improvisation (2-2) CDT 321a: Background for the
art of improvising jazz. Audition required. P, 201e. 321b:
Continuation and refinement of the techniques studied in 321a.

330a-330b. History of Western Music (3-3) CDT Detailed study of
the history of music in Western civilization from its origins to
modern times; its relationship to general cultural development.
P, 220b. Writing-Emphasis Course. P, Satisfaction of the upper-
division writing-proficiency requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis
Courses" in the Academic Policies and Graduation Requirements
section of this catalog).

331. Jazz History (3) I CDT Development of jazz in the United
States.

337. Survey of Mexican Folk Music (3) I II S Examination of the
traditional folk music of Mexico. Covers the history and
evolution of the mariachi as well as the vast potpourri of
Mexican music tradition. A working knowledge of Spanish is
helpful but not required. (Identical with LAS 337 and MAS 337)

338m. The Teaching of Secondary School Music (3) II Open only to
students admitted to teacher education. (Identical with TTE 338m)

350a-350b. Woodwind Techniques and Materials (1-1) I Class
instruction of flute, clarinet, oboe, saxophone, and bassoon,
including materials and procedures for teaching these instruments
in the public schools. Open to majors only.

351a-351b. Brass Techniques and Materials (1-1) II Class
instruction on trumpet, trombone, horn and other low brass,
including materials and procedures for teaching these instruments
in the public schools. Open to majors only.

352. String Instrument Techniques and Materials (1-3) I Class
instruction on violin, viola, cello and bass, including materials
and procedures for teaching these instruments in the public
schools. Open to majors only.

360. Music Fundamentals through Experience (3) I II S CDT Music
skills, concepts and information learned through playing, singing
and focused listening. Emphasis on beginning experiences with
autoharp, guitar, recorder and voice. No prior musical training
is assumed.

361. Music Learning and Perception in the Preadolescent Child (3)
A study of processes by which children achieve musical growth.
Examination of means, settings and materials through which
children acquire musical understanding and competence. P, 360.

370. Introduction to Conducting (2) I Conducting choral as well
as instrumental ensembles; includes basic beat patterns,
transpositions and clefs, and introduction to score study. P, CR,
220a.

371. Intermediate Instrumental and Choral Conducting (2) II
Conducting techniques for instrumental ensembles of varying
sizes; instrumental rehearsal techniques, score reading, and
score study. P, 370.

396H. Honors Proseminar (3) I II

410a-410b. Pedagogy (2-2) Study of methods and repertory suitable
for studio teaching. Open to music majors in their major
performance area only. May be convened with 510a-510b.

420a-420b. Counterpoint (3-3) Practical study of the counterpoint
of the 16th (in 420a) and 18th (in 420b) centuries. P, 220b. May
be convened with 520a-520b.

421. Orchestration (3) I CDT Instruments of the orchestra
together with practical study of the art of symphonic scoring;
original work and transcriptions. P, 220b.

422. Jazz Arranging (2) II Class instruction and practice in
writing arrangements for small jazz combos, rock groups, stage
bands, and pop-vocal combinations; detailed study of jazz
instrumental practices and problems. Open to majors only or
consult department prior to enrolling. P, 200r, 201j, 220b.

424. History and Literature of Guitar (3) II 1994-95 In-depth
study of the evolution of the guitar, lute, and vihuela,
including repertoire, style periods, and composers. Open to
majors only. May be convened with 524.

425. Undergraduate Recitals (1) I II S Public performance. P, CR
MUSI 485. For theory and composition majors, CR 440.

426a-426b. Piano Literature (3-3) 1994-95 Historical and
stylistic study of keyboard literature, instruments and
performance practices. 426a: Baroque through the early Romantic
periods. 426b: Mid-Romantic through the Contemporary periods. P,
MUSI 285-P. 426a is not prerequisite to 426b. May be convened
with 526a-526b.

428. American Pop Music: Sinatra Era (3) S American popular music
associated with Tin Pan Alley and the American musical theater
through the recordings and interpretations of Frank Sinatra.

434. Music in World Cultures (3) II S CDT Overview of nonwestern
musics in selected world cultures. 

439. Jazz Pedagogy (3) I Teaching and rehearsal technique,
literature and materials for jazz ensembles and combos. P, 220b,
250.

441. Electro-Acoustic Music (3) I Comprehensive study of
electronic music. Introduction to the electronic music studio,
tape composition, acoustics, music synthesis and sound
processing, with actual lab applications. May be convened with
541.

442. Electro-Acoustic Studio Resources (3) II Advanced
techniques: synthesis, processing, synthesizer programming,
sampling, MIDI, computer-assisted techniques, sequencing and
notation. May be convened with 542.

450. Teaching Music in the Elementary School (3) I CDT Role of
the music specialist in the elementary school; materials,
activities, and observation of demonstration teaching as they
relate to a comprehensive music curriculum and qualitative
musical experiences for children in grades K-6. Teaching
experience in addition to lecture.

451. Methods and Techniques for Secondary Vocal Music Education
(3) I Objectives, techniques and materials for teaching the
adolescent as a singer/performer/musician in choirs, ensembles
and other staged singing groups in the secondary schools.
Laboratory experience in addition to lecture.

455. Music and German Literature (3) I 1994-95 (Identical with
GER 455) May be convened with 555.

497. Workshop
o. Level I Orff Schulwerk (2) S. May be convened with 597o.

510a-510b. Pedagogy (2-2) For a description of course topics, see
410a-410b. Graduate-level requirements include a major research
project in pedagogy. May be convened with 410a-410b.

520a-520b. Counterpoint (3-3) For a description of course topics,
see 420a-420b. Graduate-level requirements include an additional
project. May be convened with 420a-420b.

521. Introduction to Graduate Music Theory (3) II Introduction to
graduate analysis with emphasis on the survey of analytical
systems as applied to a number of stylistic periods. Both
cognitive and aural procedures will be investigated. This course
may not be used to fulfill doctoral requirements in music. Open
to majors only.

522a-522b. Art Song Repertory (2-2) 1994-95 Class performance of
representative selections from the standard repertory of German,
Italian, French, Russian and English language art songs; problems
of accompaniment, interpretation, style and ensemble.
Registration restricted to singers and pianists. Open to majors
only.

523a-523b. History of the Opera (3-3) 1993-94 Detailed study of
the course of opera from its inception by the Florentine Camerata
through Berg, Menotti, Stravinsky, Ginastera, Penderecki, Britten
and others. Open to majors only.

524. History and Literature of Guitar (3) II 1994-95 For a
description of course topics, see 424. Graduate-level
requirements include a major research project.

525. History and Literature of the Wind Band (3) A research-
oriented study of wind band history and literature from the
Renaissance to the present.

526a-526b. Piano Literature (3-3) 1994-95 For a description of
course topics, see 426a-426b. Graduate-level requirements include
a major research paper and a special class presentation. P, MUSI
285-P. 526a is not prerequisite to 526b. May be convened with
426a-426b.

530. Music in the Renaissance (3) II 1994-95 Vocal and
instrumental genres from Dufay through Palestrina. Open to majors
only.

531. Music in the Baroque (3) II 1993-94 The age of the basso-
continuo; instrumental and vocal genres from Monteverdi through
J. S. Bach. Open to majors only.

532. Music in the Classical Period (3) I 1994-95 The Viennese
classical tradition from its origins to Beethoven. Open to majors
only.

533. Music of the Twentieth Century (3) I Contemporary idioms in
music; study of genres, styles, and techniques from post-
Romanticism to the present. Open to majors only.

535. Music in the Middle Ages (3) I 1993-94 Sacred and secular
monody and polyphony from Gregorian chant through Dunstable. P,
330a-330b.

536. Music in the Romantic Period (3) II 1993-94 The nineteenth
century from late Beethoven to Mahler. P, 300a-330b.

537. Survey of Early Music (3) II S Intensive survey of music
history from Gregorian chant to the late Baroque. This course may
not be used to fulfill doctoral requirements in music. Open to
majors only. 

541. Electro-Acoustic Music (3) I For a description of course
topics, see 441. Graduate-level requirements include a major
research paper and special class presentation. May be convened
with 441.

542. Electro-Acoustic Studio Resources (3) II For a description
of course topics, see 442. Graduate-level requirements include a
major research paper and special class presentation. May be
convened with 442.

550. Advanced Studies in Music Teaching (3) II S Contemporary
practices in planning, organizing and evaluating learning
experiences in music for K-12 students.

551. Behavioral Research in the Arts (3) I S 1993-94 Research
methodologies as they apply to artistic behavior; emphasis on
applying the results of existing studies to practice and on
conducting original research.

555. Music and German Literature (3) I 1994-95 (Identical with
GER 555) May be convened with 455.

560. Aesthetics of Music (3) I Exploration of the problems of
musical meanings, including a panoramic examination of what
philosophers, philosophic musicians and artists, and others of
critical intelligence have contributed to comprehensive theory.

570. Advanced Conducting (3) [Rpt.] II Styles of choral, band,
and orchestral literature, as they pertain to the problems of the
conductor; references to the styles of all periods, with emphasis
on the contemporary and modern.

597. Workshop
o. Level I Orff Schulwerk (2) S. May be convened with 497o.

600. Introduction to Graduate Study in Music (3) I
Bibliographical materials; research resources, techniques, and
problems directed toward grad. study in music. Required of all 
doctoral candidates in music. (Identical with LI S 600)

620a-620b. History of Speculative Theory (3-3) I II 1993-94
Survey of speculative theory in music, classical Greeks to
present.

621a-621b. Analysis of Music of the 18th and 19th Centuries (3-3)
Intensive analysis of works written in the larger forms. 621a:
18th century. 621b: 19th century. Open to majors only. 621a is
not prerequisite to 621b.

622. Theory Pedagogy (3) I 1994-95 Study of the philosophies,
procedures, techniques, and materials used in teaching theory at
the college level.

623. Analysis of Contemporary Music (3) II Intensive analysis of
representative works of the 20th century.

630. The Music of Bach (3) II 1994-95

631. The Music of Mozart (3) S 1993-94

635. Choral Literature and Techniques (3) [Rpt./5] I II A
research-oriented study of choral literature from all stylistic
periods and genre from the Renaissance to the present, together
with appropriate conducting techniques. 2R, 3L. Open to majors
only. P, graduate standing in choral conducting or choral music
education. No more than 12 units of this course may be applied to
a graduate degree program.

650. Foundations and Principles of Music Education (3) I S
History and philosophy of music education in the public schools,
with emphasis on the basic concepts needed for effective teaching
in the field of music, curriculum development and evaluation of
the music program.

651. Curriculum Development in Music (3) II S 1994-95 Principles
and techniques of curriculum construction applied to the field of
music.

652. Management Techniques in Music (3) II 1994-95 The management
of music at all levels of education, industry, and performance.

654. Psychology of Music (3) II S 1994-95 Music perception,
physiological and psychological responses to music, basic
acoustics, music pedagogy, and evaluation/measurement of music
behaviors.

672. Teaching Music in Higher Education (3) II Contemporary
practices in planning, organizing, and evaluating learning
experiences in music for college and university students. Open to
music majors only.

696. Seminar
a. Music Education (1-6) [Rpt./9 units] I II
b. Musicology (1-6) [Rpt./9 units] I II
c. Music Theory (1-6) [Rpt./9 units] I II
d. Composition (2) [Rpt./8 units] I II Open to majors only.

Ensembles
All courses listed below are offered both first and second
semesters and may be repeated. Prerequisite for entrance to all
ensembles is by audition or by permission of the School of Music.

Large Conducted Ensembles (200, 400, 500) (1)
b. Marching Band
c. Campus Band
d. Symphonic Band
e. Wind Symphony
h. Summer Chorus
i. Symphonic Choir
j. University Singers
k. University-Community Chorus
l. Chamber Choir
m. Choraliers
o. Symphony Orchestra
q. Collegium Musicum
r. Jazz Ensemble
s. Honor Choir (not at 500 level)

Coached Ensembles (201, 401, 501) (1) Offering chamber music
experience; designed to develop musical independence.
a. Accompanying
b. Brass Ensemble
c. Percussion Ensemble
d. Guitar Ensemble
e. Jazz Combo
f. Saxophone Ensemble
g. String Ensemble
h. Woodwind Ensemble
i. Steel Band
j. Mariachi Arizona
k. Electronic Music Ensemble
l. Harp Ensemble (1) [Rpt./9 units total at all levels] I II

Small Conducted Ensembles (202, 402, 502) (1)
a. Brass Choir
b. Contemporary Ensemble
c. Clarinet Choir
d. Musical Theatre
e. Pep Band
f. Flute Choir
g. Recital Choir 
j. Trombone Choir 

Opera Theatre (205, 405, 605) (1-4) Training in all aspects of
operatic production, including major singing roles, minor roles,
opera chorus, opera scenes and chamber operas; technical training
in set construction, makeup, costumes and lighting.  605 may also
include operatic staging techniques.  P for 405, 2 units of 205;
P for 605, 4 units of 405 or permission of the School of Music.

Composition Studies: Individual and Group Instruction

240. Introduction to Composition (3) I II [Rpt./1] Introduction
to the basics of music composition, stressing fundamental forms,
techniques and procedures. P, 120b or permission of the School of
Music.

340. Composition (3) I II [Rpt./1] Pursuit of the more
sophisticated aspects of music composition in regard to form;
handling of original ideas and searching for a broader and more
practical view of music composition as a profession. P, 6 units
of 240 or permission of the School of Music.

440. Compositional Techniques (3) I II [Rpt./15 units] Creative
techniques in the fields of modern harmony, counterpoint,
orchestration, electronic music, or specific projects in
commercial-type composition and arranging. P, 6 units of 340 or
permission of the School of Music.

640. Advanced Composition (2-6) I II [Rpt.] Individual projects
in composition. Open to theory and composition majors only.

Performance Studies: Individual and Group Instruction* (MUSI)

All of the courses listed below are offered both first and second
semester. Please see "ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS" at the beginning of
this section for information regarding prerequisites for MUSI 181
and 185.

*See schedule of fees below.

Piano

180-P, 181-P, 182-P (1-2)
185-P, 285-P, 385-P, 485-P (1-4)
580-P (1-2); 585-P (1-4)
685-P, 785-P (1-4)

Piano Accompanying

685-W (1-4)

Voice

180-V, 181-V, 182-V (1-2)
185-V, 285-V, 385-V, 485-V (1-4)
580-V (1-2); 585-V (1-4)
685-V, 785-V (1-4)

Vocal Coaching

685-J (1) 

Organ

181-O, 182-O (1-2)
185-O, 285-O, 385-O, 485-O (1-4)
580-O (1-2); 585-O (1-4)
685-O, 785-O (1-4)

Conducting

585-Q (1-4); 685-Q, 785-Q (1-4)

String Instruments

String Bass
180-N, 181-N, 182-N (1-2)
185-N, 285-N, 385-N, 485-N (1-4)
580-N (1-2); 585-N (1-4)
685-N, 785-N (1-4)

Violin
180-K, 181-K, 182-K (1-2)
185-K, 285-K, 385-K, 485-K (1-4)
580-K (1-2); 585-K (1-4)
685-K, 785-K (1-4)

Cello
180-M, 181-M, 182-M (1-2)
185-M, 285-M, 385-M, 485-M (1-4)
580-M (1-2); 585-M (1-4)
685-M, 785-M (1-4)

Harp
181-H, 182-H (1-2)
185-H, 285-H, 385-H, 485-H (1-4)
580-H (1-2); 585-H (1-4)
685-H, 785-H (1-4)

Guitar
181-G, 182-G (1-2)
185-G, 285-G, 385-G, 485-G (1-4)
580-G (1-2); 585-G (1-4)
685-G, 785-G (1-4)

Viola
180-L, 181-L, 182-L (1-2)
185-L, 285-L, 385-L, 485-L (1-4)
580-L (1-2); 585-L (1-4)
685-L, 785-L (1-4)

Harpsichord
181-I, 182-I (1-2)
185-I, 285-I, 385-I, 485-I (1-4)
580-I (1-2); 585-I (1-4)
685-I (1-4)

Wind Instruments
Baritone
180-E, 181-E, 182-E (1-2)
185-E, 285-E, 385-E, 485-E (1-4)
580-E (1-2); 585-E (1-4)
685-E (1-4)

Bassoon
180-B, 181-B, 182-B (1-2)
185-B, 285-B, 385-B, 485-B (1-4)
580-B (1-2); 585-B (1-4)
685-B, 785-B (1-4)

Clarinet
180-C, 181-C, 182-C (1-2)
185-C, 285-C, 385-C, 485-C (1-4)
580-C (1-2); 585-C (1-4)
685-C, 785-C (1-4)

Flute
180-F, 181-F, 182-F (1-2)
185-F, 285-F, 385-F, 485-F (1-4)
580-F (1-2); 585-F (1-4)
685-F, 785-F (1-4)

Horn
180-D, 181-D, 182-D (1-2)
185-D, 285-D, 385-D, 485-D (1-4)
580-D (1-2); 585-D (1-4)
685-D, 785-D (1-4)

Oboe
180-A, 181-A, 182-A (1-2)
185-A, 285-A, 385-A, 485-A (1-4)
580-A (1-2); 585-A (1-4)
685-A, 785-A (1-4)

Saxophone
180-S, 181-S, 182-S (1-2)
185-S, 285-S, 385-S, 485-S (1-4)
580-S (1-2); 585-S (1-4)
685-S, 785-S (1-4)

Trombone
180-R, 181-R, 182-R (1-2)
185-R, 285-R, 385-R, 485-R (1-4)
580-R (1-2); 585-R (1-4)
685-R, 785-R (1-4)

Trumpet
180-T, 181-T, 182-T (1-2)
185-T, 285-T, 385-T, 485-T (1-4)
580-T (1-2); 585-T (1-4); 685-T, 785-T (1-4)

Tuba
180-Y, 181-Y, 182-Y (1-2)
185-Y, 285-Y, 385-Y, 485-Y (1-4)
580-Y (1-2); 585-Y (1-4); 685-Y (1-4)

Percussion
180-Z, 181-Z, 182-Z (1-2)
185-Z, 285-Z, 385-Z, 485-Z (1-4)
580-Z (1-2), 585-Z (1-4)
685-Z, 785-Z (1-4)

Music Fees

All students registering for private or group instruction are
charged special fees according to the following schedule. Regular
and scholarship students will be assigned to private or group
instruction each semester only after a Music Fee Statement has
been secured. Rental instruments, practice rooms and lockers are
issued upon presentation of this statement.

Group lesson or one-half hour private lesson: $40.

One-hour private lesson: $60.

A music major registering for more than one weekly lesson will
pay a maximum fee of $60.

Rentals

Instruments are rented as available for use in regularly
scheduled music activities according to the following fee
schedule. Any damage beyond normal wear and tear will be paid for
by the renter of the instrument. All rental instruments must be
returned by the end of the semester or on demand.

Practice Room and Piano Rental: Pianos will be rented only to
those enrolled in group, private instruction or keyboard class.
$5 for one hour practice per day. $10 for two hours practice per
day. $15 for three hours practice per day.

Organs, Harpsichords, and Synthesizer: $10 for one hour practice
per day. $15 for two hours practice per day. $20 for three hours
practice per day.

Harps: $20 for one hour practice per day. $25 for two hours
practice per day. $30 for three hours practice per day.

Band and Orchestra Instruments: Rented only to those enrolled in
ensembles or techniques and literature classes. $10 per semester.

Refunds will be made according to the refund schedule. No refund
will be made on rental charges of $5 or less.

 


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Page last updated:  April 30, 2002
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