The University of Arizona  1993-95 General Catalog

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Management Information Systems (MIS)
McClelland Hall, Room 430
(520) 621-2748

Professors David E. Pingry, Head, Andrew D. Bailey, Jr., Seymour
Goodman, Barbara Gutek, James F. LaSalle, Jay F. Nunamaker, Jr.

Associate Professor Nicholas Aquilano, Moshe Dror, Sudha Ram,
Olivia R. Liu Sheng, Douglas R. Vogel

Assistant Professors Ai-Mei Chang, Hsinchun Chen, Joey George,
Janny Leung, Sarma Nidumolu, Titus Purdin, Pamela Slaten, Asoo
Vakharia, Suzanne Weisband

The department offers the Bachelor of Science in Business
Administration with majors in management information systems and
operations management. Interested students should follow the
program of studies in the College of Business and Public
Administration section of the catalog.

Management information systems: Education in management
information systems enables students to establish careers
involving the analysis, design, implementation, use and
management of computerized information systems in an
organizational environment. Course work is available at the
graduate and undergraduate levels.

Operations management: This major offers preparation for
management careers in manufacturing and service operations.
Emphasis is placed on operation and control of inventory systems,
materials management, plant and project scheduling, and service
design. Both quantitative and computer-based techniques are used
for specific applications in these areas.

A Master of Science with a major in management information
systems is also available. Management information systems is also
a part of the Master of Business Administration. A Doctor of
Philosophy degree is available.

111. Introduction to Computing (3) I II S Basic computer hardware
and software concepts, computer terminology, problem solving and
program development concepts, with emphasis on problem definition
and systems development, introduction to a general purpose
programming language and hands-on experience using application
software systems.

121. Introduction to Business Programming (3) I II S COBOL and
PASCAL programming language; file organization maintenance, and
structured programming techniques. P, 111.

301.* Data Structures and Algorithms (3) I II S Application
system development techniques, fundamental data structures and
algorithms; design and implementation of selected software
procedures using Pascal. P, 121, MATH 123.

307.* Computer Architecture and Data Communications (3) I II S
Computer architecture, operating systems principles, systems
software, data communications, networks, protocols and
distributed processing.

331.* Database Management Systems (3) I II S Introduction to
database management systems; relational, CODASYL, and hierarchic
models; security concurrency, integrity and recovery issues;
query interfaces. (Identical with C SC 331)

341.* Information Systems Analysis and Design (3) I II S The
analysis and logical design of business data processing,
management information and management control systems; project
management and cost-benefit analysis; techniques for stating and
analyzing information systems requirements; use of automated and
non-automated techniques for logical system design. CR 307.

342.* Data Structures and Algorithms (3) I II S (Identical with C
SC 342)

372.* Comparative Programming Languages (3) I II (Identical with
C SC 372)

373.* Basic Operations Management (3) I II S GRD Quantitative
techniques applied to design, operation, control and improvement
of manufacturing systems. Topics include forecasting, facility
planning and layout, inventory management, quality control and
just-in-time manufacturing. P, STAT 275, MATH 123.

396H.* Honors Proseminar (3) II

411.* Social Issues of Computing (3) I II S Broad survey of the
individual, organizational, cultural, social and ethical issues
provoked by current and projected uses of computers. May be
convened with 511.

421.* Advanced Systems Modeling and Simulation (3) I Simulation
concepts, simulation software, modeling of systems, model
validation, selecting input probability distributions, random
variate generation, statistical analysis of output data and SIMAN
simulation language. P, fundamental knowledge of probability and
statistics. (Identical with C SC 421)

422.* Mathematical Programming and Applications (3) I Formulation
and solution of mathematical programming models for decision
making. Topics include linear programming, network flow models
and integer programming. These models are applied in systems
design, manufacturing, logistics, finance, and other areas. P,
MATH 119. May be convened with 522.

441.* Information System Design and Implementation (3) I II S
Design of computer-based solutions to individual and
organizational problems; involves an analysis of subsystems user
interfaces, hardware/software selection and evaluation, and
system implementation; explores interface between systems and
individuals and systems and organizations. P, 331, 341.

450.* International Dimensions of Information Technologies (3) I
National and regional information technology development
strategies and policies; IT and national sovereignty; development
and control of global "information highways;" impact of public
and business policies on information systems design and use;
international institutions and IT: convergence or divergence of
information systems across countries, regions and international
economic sectors. May be convened with 550.

451.* Advanced Business Programming (3) I Business systems
programming environment; basic and advanced COBOL; file
organization and access methods; external sort and multikey
files; 4GLs in data processing. P, 301. May be convened with 551.

453.* Software Systems (3) I II Software development and software
engineering; brings together the elements of programming
language, operating system, and development techniques; teaches
and uses the C programming language and the Unix operating
system. May be convened with 553.

461.* Accounting Information Systems (3) I II (Identical with
ACCT 461)

471.* Policy Formation and Management Information Systems (3) I
II S Integration of the MIS activity with the functional
operations of the business organization; utilization of case
studies and a computer simulation model to enhance executive
decision making relative to planning, organizing, controlling,
and actuating. Open only to BPA majors. P, FIN 311, MAP 305, MKTG
361, Senior Standing. Writing-Emphasis Course. P, Satisfaction of
the upper-division writing-proficiency requirement (see "Writing-
Emphasis Courses" in the Academic Policies and Graduation
Requirements section of this catalog).

473a-473b.* Production and Operations Management (3-3) Productive
systems, including service type industries; activities entailed
in selecting, designing, operating, controlling, and updating
systems.  473a: Forecasting, aggregate planning, MRP, inventory
models under uncertainty, scheduling. P, 373. 473b: Capacity
expansion and facility location, facility layout, assembly line
balancing, new technologies (GT, FMS, CAD/CAM) project
management, case studies in manufacturing and services. May be
convened with 573a-573b.

474.* Current Topics in Operations Management (3) II Coverage of
new techniques and technologies in operations management.
Examples of topics that may be covered are JIT, OPT, robotics. P,
473b or CR. May be convened with 574.

475.* Productivity Improvement (3) I Topics in productivity
measurement, evaluation and control: work measurement, job
design, statistical quality control, productivity improvement
through effective management. P, 373. May be convened with 575.

476.* Management of Service Operations (3) I Application of
operations management concepts to service organizations;
exploration of critical issues such as facility location, layout,
scheduling, and capacity management; case analyses and/or term
project. P, 373. May be convened with 576.

477.* Materials and Logistics Management (3) I Organization,
management and control of material flow processes; logistical
strategies and relationships of procurement, handling,
warehousing, transportation, and inventory control. P, 373, 473a.
May be convened with 577.

478.* Project Management (3) I Definition of programs and
projects, organizational forms, developing the work breakdown
structure, scheduling techniques (PERT and CPM), control
mechanisms such as milestones, cost reports and progress reports.
Lectures and case analyses. P, 305, 373. May be convened with
578.

479.* Computer Models for Operations Management (3) II Use of
available software packages to analyze complex operations
management problems. P, 473a/473b or CR. May be convened with
579.

*Open only to students who meet the requirements for Advanced
Standing as specified in the College of Business and Public
Administration section of this catalog.

480. Introduction to Expert Systems (3) I II An in-depth
technical background on the concepts and skills essential to
analysis, design and development of business expert systems.
Topics include applications and development in AI, knowledge-
based systems architecture, knowledge representation and
acquisition, and Prolog; focus on business problem solving. May
be convened with 580.

486. Machine Scheduling (3) II General job-shop problems,
performance measures. Complexity classification of problems, P
and NP characteristics. Single and parallel machines, flow, open-
shop and resource-constrained scheduling. P, 422/522 or
instructor's approval. May be convened with 586.

501. Management Information Systems (3) I Introduction to
managerial issues raised by the use and implementation of
information technologies in business. Emphasis is on
organizational and technical foundations of information systems;
problem solving skills using PC-based software. 

507a-507b. Information Systems Architecture and Data
Communications (3-3) 507a: Fundamental concepts of operating
systems. The principles and techniques required for engineering
and understanding operating systems are covered. Examples from
real systems are given to illustrate application of particular
concepts. Hardware architecture that is relevant for
understanding operating systems. 507b: Comprehensive view of data
and computer communications. Explores key issues in the field, in
the general categories of principles (including basic concepts
and terminology used in the field); design approaches and
applications in business; standards such as the IEEE, OSI, TCP/IP
and others. P, 507a.

511. Social Issues of Computing (3) I II S For a description of
course topics, see 411. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional term paper. May be convened with 411.

521a-521b. Advanced Systems Modeling and Simulation (3-3) 521a:
Simulation concepts, simulation software, modeling of systems,
model validation, selecting input probability distributions,
random variate generation, statistical analysis of output data
and SIMAN simulation language. P, fundamental knowledge of
probability and statistics. 521b: Modeling and analyzing complex
business systems using advanced simulation and statistical
techniques. A semester project is required. P, 521a or equivalent
course. (Identical with C SC 521a-521b)

522. Mathematical Programming and Applications (3) I For a
description of course topics, see 422. Graduate-level
requirements include an additional term paper or program. May be
convened with 422.

531a-531b. Data Structures and Database Management (3-3) 531a:
Abstract data types, data structures and their implementation in
Pascal programs. Data structures covered include stacks, queues,
lists and trees. 531b: Introduction to concepts of database
processing in comparison with file processing. Review of the
organization and relevant data structures. Detailed study of
various tools needed for logical and physical design. Detailed
study of data flow diagrams and the entity-relationship model,
Relational and CODASYL database models, as well as implementation
aspects for a database system. Database applications using SQL/DS
on the IBM 3090. P, 531a or equivalent data structures course and
knowledge of the IBM 3090 (VM/CMS) environment.

541a-541b. Computer-Aided Information Systems Analysis and Design
(3-3) Introduction to the management and techniques associated
with software development, both domestically and internationally
with focus on the analysis and design stages. Emphasizes
international issues. Involves "hands-on" experience with
Computer-Aided Software Engineering (CASE) tool. (Identical with
C SC 541a-541b)

546. Graphs and Network Flows (3) II 1993-94 Formulation and
solution of problems formulated on graphs and networks. Topics
include shortest paths, max-flow min-cut, min-cost flow,
matching, traveling salesman and vehicle routing problems. Credit
is allowed for this course or SIE 546. P, 552 or SIE 544.

550. International Dimensions of Information Technologies (3) I
For a description of course topics, see 450. Graduate-level
requirements include an additional term paper or program and a
class presentation. May be convened with 450.

551.* Advanced Business Programming (3) I For a description of
course topics, see 451. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional in-depth term paper and 30 percent more reading. P,
501. May be convened with 451.

553. Software Systems (3) I II For a description of course
topics, see 453. Graduate-level requirements include the
production of several medium-sized programs, with emphasis on the
program life-cycle, maintainability, and life-cost. May be
convened with 453.

554.  omputer Graphics (3) II Interactive computer graphics; user
interface design; pictorial data structures and management. P,
531a.

567. Design and Control of Production Systems (3) II Introduction
to the basic concepts in operations management. Topics covered
include project planning, aggregate planning, forecasting,
classical inventory models, linear programming and simulation.
Open only to graduate students in BPA.

570. Management and Evaluation of Information Systems (3) I II
The methodologies of economics and management information systems
are applied to the problem of designing and evaluating
information systems for a profit-maximizing firm. An MBA
integrative course. Open only to students admitted to BPA
graduate programs. P, ECON 500a (Identical with ACCT 570 and ECON
570)

572. Operations Management (3) I Manufacturing operations from a
tactical standpoint. Major topics include materials requirements
planning, capability management, scheduling and JIT planning and
control. P, 567 or consent of instructor.

573a-573b. Production and Operations Management (3-3) For a
description of course topics, see 473a-473b. Graduate-level
requirements include an additional term paper or program. May be
convened with 473a-473b.

574. Current Topics in Operations Management (3) II For a
description of course topics, see 474. Graduate-level
requirements include an additional term paper or program. May be
convened with 474.

575. Productivity Improvement (3) I For a description of course
topics, see 475. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional term paper or program. May be convened with 475.

576. Management of Service Operations (3) I For a description of
course topics, see 476. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional term paper or program. May be convened with 476.

577. Materials and Logistics Management (3) I For a description
of course topics, see 477. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional term paper or program. May be convened with 477.

578. Project Management (3) I For a description of course topics,
see 478. Graduate-level requirements include an additional term
paper or program. May be convened with 478.

579. Computer Models for Operations Management (3) I For a
description of course topics, see 479. Graduate-level
requirements include an additional term paper or program. May be
convened with 479.

580. Introduction to Expert Systems (3) I II For description of
course topics, see 480. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional term paper. May be convened with 480.

583. Stochastic Models in Management Science (3) II Markov
chains, models or arrival processes, continuous-time Markov
chains, queuing theory, models of computer and manufacturing
systems. P, MATH 123.

584. Combinatorial Optimization and Integer Programming (3) II
Introduction to the formation, solution and implementation of
integer programming models, for decision making where the choices
are discrete. Topics include network flow models, computational
complexity, branch-and-bound and cutting-plane methods. P, 422 or
522.

586. Machine Scheduling (3) II General job-shop problems,
performance measures. Complexity classification of problems, P
and NP characteristics. Single and parallel machines, flow, open-
shop and resource-constrained scheduling. P, 422/522 or
instructor's approval.

588. Systems Design for Management (3) I II Focuses on automated
tools to support managers in organizations including office
automation, decision support systems, GDSS; applications and
methodologies for designing, implementing, and evaluating such
systems and their organizational impact.

589. Mathematical Programming Software Design and Construction
(3) II Fundamentals of building and solving optimization models
on the computer; techniques for the design and construction of
mathematical programming software. P, 422.

611a-611b. Topics in Research Methodologies in MIS (3-3) 611a:
Introduces beginning doctoral degree students and advanced
master's degree students to important research and survey
articles in the field of management information systems. 611b:
Provides a knowledge of research methodologies used in the MIS
discipline, including experimental design, surveys, case studies,
field work, and software engineering.

646. Combinatorial Optimization and Integer Programming (3) 1994-
95 Formulation, solution and implementation of integer problems,
for decision making where choices are discrete. Methods include
branch-and-bound, cutting-plane methods and Lagrangean
relaxation. Credit is allowed for this course or SIE 646. P, 522
or SIE 544.

671. International Issues (3) I Analysis of industry successes
and failures in global markets, focusing on the national
characteristics, company strategies and national policies behind
them. Case studies of more than 20 countries around the world
(most of which will be student generated). Regional developments
and problems. Sectorial emphases on international technological
developments and issues related to the globalization of the
information technologies. P, graduate standing and at least one
500-level MIS or equivalent course.

680. Advanced Topics in Artificial Intelligence (3) I In-depth
discussion of advanced AI topics such as natural language
processing, cognitive modeling techniques, machine learning
techniques, and neural network computing. Hands-on projects are
required. P, 531a. Open to all graduate students.

696. Seminar
a. Readings in MIS (3)
b. Group Support Systems (3)
c. Emerging Information Technologies (3)
d. Research Techniques in MIS (3)
e. Recent Advances in MIS (3)
f. Mathematical Programming (3) P, 422
g. Advanced Topics in Data Management (3)
h. Master's Report Projects (3) S Open to majors only.
i. Management of Executive Information (3) II

796. Seminar
a. Research Issues (3) [Rpt./6 units] Open to majors only.

797. Workshop
a. Research Design (3) [Rpt./5] I II P, 796a.

 


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