The University of Arizona  1993-95 General Catalog

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Media Arts (MAR)
Marshall Building, Room 220
(520) 621-7352

Professors Caren J. Deming, Head, J. Michael Gillette, Peter
Lehman

Associate Professors Harry Atwood (Emeritus), Mary Beth
Haralovich, Wesley B. Marshall, Alfonso Moises

Assistant Professors H. Bruce Fowler (Emeritus), Denise J.
Kervin, Donald Kirihara, Eileen R. Meehan, Robert J. Sabal,
Beverly A. Seckinger, Peter Treistman

Lecturer F.D. Nott

The department provides instructional programs designed to
prepare students to assume leadership roles in the media arts as
independent artists or as members of industries such as film,
television, and cable television. Course work focuses upon
history, theory, criticism, production, and management of the
media arts. The department offers courses leading to the Bachelor
of Arts in Media Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degree with a
major in Media Arts. Advanced students have opportunities to
obtain preprofessional experience through the department's
internship program, through work on various departmental
projects, and through work at the University's Public
Broadcasting stations KUAT-TV, KUAT-AM, and KUAT-FM.

The Bachelor of Arts in Media Arts is for students planning
careers in electronic journalism or media management, or seeking
a well-balanced liberal arts education in preparation for
graduate study at the M.A. or Ph.D. level.

Requirements: In addition to the general education requirements
for the Bachelor of Arts in Media Arts, as described in the
Faculty of Fine Arts (College of Arts and Sciences) section of
this catalog, students must complete COMM 100 and 102 and one of
the following English composition courses beyond the freshman
requirement: ENGL 207, 307, or 308. Requirements in the major: 33
units of media arts courses, including 101, 200, 209 or 225, 304
or 305, 221 or 222, and 320 or 362 or 380.

At least 12 units must be upper-division courses.  No more than 6
units of internship and independent study course work (493 and
499) may be counted toward the major; and no more than 6 units of
production and practicum course work (110, 304, 305, 241, 314,
315, 316, 414, 415, 497) may be counted toward the major. No more
than 48 units in media arts may be counted toward the degree. At
least 18 units in the major must be university credit. The
department recommends that students develop basic typing and
computer skills prior to taking 200-level courses in Media Arts.

The Bachelor of Fine Arts prepares students for creative roles in
media production, primarily in video and film. This program also
provides an appropriate basis for advanced study at the M.F.A.
level.

Requirements: Including the general education requirements for
the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Media Arts, as described in the
Faculty of Fine Arts (College of Arts and Sciences) section of
this catalog, all B.F.A. students must complete 45 units outside
of Media Arts. One course must focus on gender, class, race,
ethnicity, or non-western culture. This course must be approved
by the major advisor and may be taken in the Department of Media
Arts or in another department.

Requirements in the major include 56 units of media arts courses,
including 101, 200, 304, 305, 309 or 333, 314 or 315, 414 or 415
or 462, 362 or 380, 6 units of media history and 6 units of media
criticism/theory. The remaining 18 units are electives selected
from other courses in media arts.

At least 30 units in the major must be university credit.

The teaching minor: 101, 110 or 304, 200, 209 or 225, 280, 221 or
222, and Media Arts electives for a minimum total of 24 units.

Basic production facilities and equipment are provided by the
department. Students are responsible for the cost of film/tape
stock, processing, and other necessary supplies.

The department participates in the honors program.

Advanced Standing Policy

Enrollment in upper-division courses (those numbered 300-499)
taught by the Department of Media Arts is restricted by an
Advanced Standing Policy.  This policy restricts enrollment in
all upper-division courses in the department to students who have
met qualifying requirements and who have approved Applications
for Advanced Standing on file in the department.  The policy
applies to all undergraduate students irrespective of the catalog
in force when they entered the University.

Students entering the major by intra-campus transfer are subject
to all of the provisions of the Advanced Standing Policy in
effect at the time of their acceptance to major status.

All students having been absent from the University for more than
two consecutive semesters must reapply for Advanced Standing and
meet all provisions of the Advanced Standing Policy in effect at
the time of their return.

All undergraduate students seeking to register for the restricted
upper-division courses must make application and have their
eligibility established. Information and application forms are
available in the Department Office, Modern Languages Building
265.

In general, permission to enroll in the restricted courses is
granted subsequent to receipt of complete documentation of a
student's eligibility. Conditional permission to register for
restricted courses is granted only to Media Arts majors who are
completing any outstanding requirements and whose grade-point
averages meet the current eligibility level.

Ineligible students either erroneously or inadvertently enrolled
in restricted courses will have their enrollments cancelled.

Advanced Standing Requirements

Eligibility requirements for advanced standing are as follows:

Media Arts Majors:  Applicants must have

1. credit for a minimum of 56 units;
2. completion of M AR 101 and 200;
3. a minimum of 12 regularly graded units of course work at The
University of Arizona;*
4. a grade-point average of not less than 2.25 overall;

*upper division transfer students, see departmental advisor

Transfer Students

Transfer students who otherwise would qualify except that they do
not meet the requirements of having taken a minimum of 12
regularly graded units at the University of Arizona will be given
provisional permission to enroll in upper-division courses until
they have completed this minimum.  Thereafter, they must meet all
of the regular provisions of the policy.

See the Department Office, Modern Languages Building 265 for
additional information.

100. Orientation to Study in Media Arts (1) I II Orientation to
undergraduate programs, productive study methods, and use of
professional literature and other resource materials in media
arts. Open to M AR majors only, who are freshmen, foreign
students, or new transfer students to The University of Arizona.

101. Introduction to Media Arts (3) I II S Survey of radio,
television, film. Examination of the media, their history,
aesthetics, technology and relationship to society and culture.
2R,2S.

106. Mass Media and Society (3) II S Survey of the relationships
between mass media and society, effects of mass media on
individuals, institutions, culture, social structure. 

110. Beginning Film Techniques (3) S Silent motion picture
production techniques. Individual and/or team projects to include
completion of 3 short super-8 silent films. University provides
camera, editing, and projection equipment; student provides film
and pays all processing and laboratory charges.

200. Fundamentals of Theory and Aesthetics in Media Arts (3) I II
Survey of the elements which make up video, film, and audio
images: light, color, area, depth, movement, and sound in message
design and structure.

205. Reporting the News (3) I II (Identical with JOUR 205)

208. Law of the Press (3) I (Identical with JOUR 208)

209. Survey of Film History (3) II A survey of the history of
motion pictures. Films are chosen from a variety of nations and
time periods to illustrate the diversity of film styles. 2R, 3L.

221. American Cinema: Directors and Genres (3) I Aesthetic and
cultural aspects of westerns, comedies, and mysteries; major
films by John Ford, Alfred Hitchcock, Howard Hawks, and Blake
Edwards. P, 200. 2R, 2S.

222. Major American Broadcast Genres (3) II Survey of major radio
and television program types, with emphasis on serial and series
forms; drama, melodrama, western, crime drama, comedy, sports.
2R, 2S. P, 200.

225. Survey of Broadcasting History (3) I Survey of American
broadcasting, emphasis on programming, economic and industrial
history. 2R, 1D.

239. Speaking in the Arts (3) I II (Identical with T AR 239)

241. Beginning Photography (3) [Rpt./2] I II (Identical with ART
241) Fee.

280. Introduction to Electronic Journalism (3) I II Survey of the
history, organization, and practice of electronic journalism.

302. Recording Studio Production (3) I II (Identical with MUS
302)

303. Professional Practices (1) I II S Prepares students to meet
the professional expectations of media work. Job search
strategies (resume writing and interviewing) and professional
concepts are studied. P, 101, 200, 304, or 305, and one Writing-
Emphasis Course.

304. Beginning Video Production (4) I II Introduction to the
elements of video production, including professional practices,
production elements, and personnel in television stations and
video centers. 3R, 3L. P, 101; CR, 200.

305. Introduction to Film Production (4) I II Basic principles of
16mm film production and examination of production techniques and
practices; laboratory experience with film production equipment
and production of several short films. 2R, 2S, 3L. P, CR, 200.

308. Survey of Media Law and Regulation (3) I II Introduction to
the legal and regulatory framework of the electronic media and
film: licensing, cross-ownership, public interest, self-
regulation, consumer influence, and related topics.

309. History of the Documentary (3) II Major traditions,
movements and film makers. Social, aesthetic, and technical
aspects of documentary films and videos. P, M AR advanced
standing.

311. Lighting for Media Production (2) I Function and qualities
of light; typical application in photography, television, motion
pictures, architecture, and interior design. P, 200.

312. Video Art in America (3) II 1993-94 Investigation of artist-
produced video from 1960s to the present. Screenings, critical
readings and projects. (Identical with ART 312)

314. Intermediate Video Production (3) I II Production of various
types of television programs, including techniques and theory of
studio and field operations, use of equipment (studio and EFP)
and personnel relationships, with emphasis on the role of the
television producer. 2R, 3L. Open to majors and minors only. P,
200, 304, and acceptance of portfolio by Portfolio Committee.

315. Intermediate Film Production (3) I Production of films, with
emphasis on sound, editing techniques, and visual design.
Students will produce a short film. 2R, 3L. P, 200, 305 and
acceptance of portfolio by Portfolio Committee.

316. Radio Production (3) I II Analysis and production of
selected radio programs with emphasis on complex radio formats
and production techniques. 2R, 3L. P, 304 or 305.

320. Media Arts Criticism (3) II Analysis of arguments in
journalistic and academic criticism and application of critical
approaches in written assignments. Writing-Emphasis Course. P,
200 and satisfaction of the upper-division writing-proficiency
requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis Courses"  in the Academic
Policies and Graduation Requirements section of this catalog).

325. History of German Cinema (3) I (Identical with GER 325)

333. Roles in Narrative Production (3) II The major roles used in
the production of narrative films and videos, including
production management and design, camera, sound, editing. P,
advanced standing in media arts, M AR 304 or 305.

336. History of Japanese Film (3) I II Development of Japanese
cinema from its origins through its recognition as a major
international art film producer during the 1950s and 1960s.
Advanced standing waived for this course. See instructor. 2R, 2S.
(Identical with JPN 336)

349. Intermediate Artists' Video (3) I (Identical with ART 349)

350. Professional Media Interviewing (3) I The interview process
and specific interview formats, including survey research,
journalistic, and panel formats. Interviewer performance is
stressed; practice provided.

362. Writing for Media (3) I II Principles of media writing.
Creation of final scripts for radio, television and film
presentations. Writing-Emphasis Course. See "Writing-Emphasis
Courses" in the Academic Guidelines section of this catalog).
(Identical with JOUR 362)

371. Film/Video Production Financing (3) I II Strategies for
production financing for independent film/video projects and ways
to position a project in the marketplace. Students will develop a
prospectus for their own project. P, 304 or 305.

372. Exhibition Management (3) I II Programming strategies,
exhibition techniques, marketing approaches, and management
models for film and video series, guest artist presentations,
video installations, conferences, and festivals.

376. Audience Measurement (3) I Interpretation and utilization of
broadcast ratings, surveys, polls and other measures of the
attitudes, opinions and behaviors of media audiences;
relationships to social and management concerns. 

380. Writing for News and Documentary (3) I Advanced work in the
writing of news and public affairs programs for radio,
television, cable, and other electronic media with emphasis on
the public affairs program and documentary formats. P, 205, 304.
Writing-Emphasis Course. P, satisfaction of the upper-division
writing-proficiency requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis Courses"
in the Academic Guidelines section of this catalog).

381. Reporting for Broadcast News (3) I Advanced procedures and
techniques utilized in news gathering, writing and production of
newscasts with emphasis on events coverage, newsroom
organization. Performance practice is emphasized in laboratory
exercises. 2R, 3L. P, 380. (Identical with JOUR 381) Writing-
Emphasis Course. P, satisfaction of the upper-division writing-
proficiency requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis Courses" in the
Academic Guidelines section of this catalog).

414. Advanced Video Production (3) II Production of video
programs of various kinds, with emphasis on the role of the
director. 2R, 3L. P, 314, and acceptance of portfolio by
Portfolio Committee. 

415. Advanced Narrative Media Production (3) II Advanced practice
in film or video production, resulting in a completed narrative.
University provides most equipment. Students pay lab and other
associated costs. 2R, 2S. P, 314 or 315, 333.

421. Cultural Theory and Criticism of Media (3) I Critical and
cultural theories and their application to media arts, including
mass culture, empiricism, technoculture, political economy. P,
200, M AR advanced standing. May be convened with 521.

423. Representation of Gender in the Media (3) I Investigation of
gender as a social and cultural construct through the critical
analysis of media products including television, film, and
advertisements. P, 200, 320. (Identical with W S 423) May be
convened with 523.

424. Film Theory and Criticism (3) I Advanced studies in current
cinematic theory and criticism. Historical examination of major
film theories, including formalism, realism, classical Hollywood,
structuralism, semiotics, and psychanalytic theories. May be
convened with 524.

426. Sexuality in Media Narratives (3) I Analysis of sexual
representation in popular and underground film, music video and
avant-garde video art. May be convened with 526.

427. Feminist Media Theory (3) II Includes psychoanalysis,
semiotics, materialism, race and class analysis, and feminist
media production. P, 200, M AR advanced standing. May be convened
with 527.

449. Advanced Artists' Video (3) [Rpt./1] II (Identical with ART
449)

450. Conducting Media Campaigns (3) II Analysis of the
development and distribution of information through the media.
Press releases, fact sheets, public service announcements,
interviews, press conferences, and public hearings are studied.
P, 350 or 376.

462. Advanced Writing for Media (3) I Advanced dramatic/narrative
screenplay writing. Practice experience in the creative process
leading to a complete screen play. P, 362.

470. The Press and Society (3) I II (Identical with JOUR 470) 

472. Broadcast and Cable Management (3) I II Investigation of
media management techniques. Scheduling, organizational
structure, networks and affiliates, ethics, legal constraints,
syndication, personnel and related topics. P, 308.

476. Broadcast and Cable Programming (3) I Investigation of
principles, techniques, and current issues in programming for
radio and television stations (commercial and public) and cable
systems. P, 101. May be convened with 576.

497. Workshop
a. Community Audio-Video Production (3) [Rpt./6 units] I II P,
314 or 414 (depending on production assignment) and acceptance of
portfolio by Portfolio Committee.
c. Electronic Journalism (4) I II S [Rpt./1] P, 381.
e. News Production (3) [Rpt./1] I II S P, 214.
g. Cinema Production (1-6) [Rpt./20 units] S

500. Graduate Study in Media Arts (1) I Responsibilities of
graduate students, forms and procedures, campus resources,
research tools, writing standards, and Media Arts content areas
in approaches.

521. Cultural Theory and Criticism of Media (3) I For description
of course topics, see 421. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional paper and additional reading. May be convened with
421.

523. Representation of Gender in the Media (3) II For a
description of course topics, see 423. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth research paper on gender and
media. May be convened with 423.

524. Film Theory and Criticism (3) I For a description of course
topics, see 424. Graduate-level requirements include additional
readings and an in-depth research paper on issues in film theory.
May be convened with 424.

526. Sexuality in Media Narratives (3) I For a description of
course topics, see 426. Graduate-level requirements include
additional reading and writing assignments and different
examinations. May be convened with 426.

527. Feminist Media Theory (3) II For description of course
topics, see 427. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional paper and additional reading. May be convened with
427. 

528. Current Issues in Media Theory (3) I Advanced study of major
concepts, issues, and movements in contemporary film theory:
psychoanalysis, semiotics, Marxism, deconstruction,
postmodernism.

532. Media Political Economy (3) II Theories and analytic
techniques of political economy approaches to media arts through
history of telecommunications, broadcasting, film, recorded music
and cable television.

535. Hollywood: Films and Industry (3) I Social-industrial
history of American film from "primitive" through Hollywood
cinema to the present; role of film industry and social context
in development of narration and style.

576. Broadcast and Cable Programming (3) I For a description of
course topics, see 476. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research paper on an issue related to contemporary media
programming. May be convened with 476.

639. Methods of Media History (3) II Analysis of methods used in
film and broadcast histories; theories of media history;
empirical evidence and interpretation; approaches to placing a
media text within its industrial and social context. 

696.* Seminars
a. Theory and Criticism (3) [Rpt./6 units] I II 
b. Media Arts History (3) [Rpt./6] I II
c. Readings in Media Arts (3) [Rpt./9] I II
*Students may earn a maximum of 9 units in M AR 696, of which a
maximum of 6 units may be earned in 696a or 696b.

Medical Technology
(See Health-Related Professions)

 


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