The University of Arizona  1993-95 General Catalog

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Linguistics (LING)
Douglass Building, Room 200E
(520) 621-6897

Professors D. Terence Langendoen, Head, Richard Demers, Merrill
Garrett (Psychology, Speech and Hearing Sciences), Robert M.
Harnish (Philosophy), Jane Hill (Anthropology), Adrienne Lehrer,
Susan Steele

Associate Professors Diana Archangeli, Michael Hammond, Richard
T. Oehrle, Ofelia Zepeda

Assistant Professors Andrew Barss, Paul Bloom (Psychology), Molly
Diesing, Simin Karimi (Near Eastern Studies), Janet Nicol

The Department of Linguistics offers instruction in introductory,
intermediate, and advanced topics in phonology, syntax, and
semantics. It also offers course work in Native American
languages of the Southwest (e.g., Navajo and O'odham) and courses
on the native languages of North America. Undergraduate majors in
linguistics can expect to be prepared to undertake professional
graduate studies in linguistics and related areas or to pursue
careers in such language related fields as education, publishing,
and certain sectors of business.

The Department of Linguistics offers programs leading to a
Bachelor of Arts, a Master of Arts, and a Doctor of Philosophy
with a major in linguistics. For graduate admission and degree
requirements, please see the Graduate Catalog.

The major for the Bachelor of Arts: 30 units, including 201, 300,
310 and 315, and one year of work in an uncommonly taught
language (e.g., Greek, Latin, Russian, or any non-Indo-European
language). The remainder is to be selected in consultation with
the undergraduate advisor.

Majors are urged to continue their foreign language study beyond
the minimum 16 units required by the college.

Course work for the supporting minor is selected in consultation
with the undergraduate advisor. A minor in linguistics requires a
minimum of 20 units including 101 or 201, and two of 300, 310 and
315.

The department participates in the honors program.

101. Introduction to Language (3) I II S Survey of linguistic
concepts and methods: communication among animals; physiology of
human speech; elementary phonetics, syntax, and language change;
language and the brain; language and thought.

102. Linguistics for Native American Communities (3) S
Introduction to descriptive linguistics for Native Americans;
practical linguistic and social issues in Native American
languages; phonetics and phonology; orthography; dialects and
language change; classroom applications. (Identical with AINS
102)

195. Colloquium
a. Learning Foreign Language: Windows to the World (1) (Identical
with LING 195a, which is the home)

201. Introduction to Linguistics (3) II Fundamentals of
linguistics; phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics
and language acquisition; provides basis for further study in the
field.

203a-203b. Elementary Navajo Language (3-3) Speaking, reading,
writing, understanding and transcribing. (Identical with AINS
203a-203b)

210. Native Languages of North America (3) I II S Genetic and
typological diversity of North American native languages; areal
features, i.e., characteristics spread over a geographical
region; and the history of the study of these languages,
concentrating on individuals and the problems of classification.
(Identical with AINS 210)

222. The Structures and Sources of American English Words (3) II
S Linguistic principles governing the internal structure of
English words and the ways in which new words are created, with a
focus on spelling, sounds and morphemes. (Identical with ENGL
222)

260. Speech Science (4) I (Identical with SP H 260)

285. Introduction to Humanities Computing (3) S (Identical with
GER 285)

300. Introduction to Syntax (3) I II Fundamentals of syntactic
analysis. Central notions of generative grammar. Aspects of the
structure of English and other languages. P, 101 201. Writing-
Emphasis Course. P, satisfaction of the upper-division writing-
proficiency requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis Courses" in the
Academic Policies and Graduation Requirements section of the
catalog).

303. Gender and Language (3) I 1994-95 (Identical with ANTH 303)

307a-307b. Elementary O'odham (Papago) Language (3-3) Speaking,
reading, writing, and oral comprehension in the O'odham (Papago)
language. (Identical with AINS 307a-307b)

310. Morphology and Morpho-syntactic Properties of the World's
Languages (3) I II Introduces the student to the commonly shared
features of word building rules in the world's languages and
provides an introduction to the theoretical issues involved in
languages for which the word/sentence distinction does not exist.
Students will have many problem sets containing data from dozens
of languages. P, 101 or 201.

315. Introduction to Phonology (3) I II Considers the sound
structure of a wide variety of human languages, with the aim of
finding principles that describe in an insightful way the
properties of their sounds and sound patterns. In addition the
course will introduce the student to the higher level
organizational principles governing the combinations of sounds
into morphemes, words, and phrases. P, 101 or 201.

318. Language Development (3) I (Identical with PSYC 318)

320. Language and Social Issues (3) I II S 1993-94 Focuses on the
theme that individuals identify with groups (in part) on the
basis of the language or dialect they use. Examines the role of
the individual as a language-using being with the problems of
self-identity and of social difference, not only in our
multilingual-multicultural country, but in the world as well.

376. Introduction to the Philosophy of Language (3) I 1994-95
(Identical with PHIL 376)

388. Symbolic Processing (3) I II 1993-94 Fundamentals of
processing of natural language text, especially parsing and
grammar development; includes programming in Prolog or other
symbolic programming languages. P, C SC 115 or equivalent
programming background; LING 101 or 201.

402. Gender and Language in Japan (3) II 1994-95 (Identical with
JPN 402) May be convened with 502

403. Foundations of Syntactic Theory I (3) I Introduction to
fundamental issues in the theory of syntax. Familiarizes the
student with the essentials of (1) government binding theory and
its precursors, and (2) standard categorial grammar and its
relatives. P, 300. May be convened with 503.

410. Foundations of Phonological Theory I (3) I Investigation of
the principles that underlie current phonological theory,
concentrating on the representation of sounds and the regular
patterns of sound in natural language. Topics include distinctive
feature theory, syllable theory, the core skeleton, rule
formulation and rule interactions. P, 315. May be convened with
510.

411. Introduction to Japanese Linguistics (3) (Identical with JPN
411) May be convened with 511.

412. Advanced Japanese Linguistics (3) (Identical with JPN 412)
May be convened with 512.

419. Linguistic Structure of Modern Chinese (3) (Identical with
CHN 419) May be convened with 519.

420. Linguistic Structure of Modern Chinese (3) (Identical with
CHN 420) May be convened with 520.

422. Linguistic Semantics and Lexicology (3) II 1994-95 Study of
word and sentence meaning, relationship between the lexicon and
the grammar, idioms, metaphor, etymology, and change of meaning.
P, one course in linguistics. (Identical with PHIL 422) May be
convened with 522.

425. Language Variation (3) II 1993-94 Study of geographical and
social dialects, stylistic differences, and idiolectal variation
and the implications of variation for writing grammars and for
understanding language change. P, one course in linguistics,
preferably LING 101, 201 or ANTH 276. (Identical with ANTH 425)
May be convened with 525.

426. Introduction to Arabic Linguistics (3) II (Identical with
ARB 426) May be convened with 526.

436. Japanese Sociolinguistics (3) [Rpt./1] I (Identical with JPN
436) May be convened with 536.

445a-445b. Structure of a Non-Western Language (3-3) [Rpt./2] In-
depth linguistic analysis of selected phonological, syntactic,
and semantic problems in a non-Western language, concentrating on
native languages of the Southwest area. P, 101. (Identical with
AINS 445a-445b) May be convened with 545a-545b.

451. Language Acquisition (3) II (Identical with SP H 451) May be
convened with 551.

453. Theory of Spanish Morphosyntax (3) (Identical with SPAN 453)

457. Applied Linguistics (3) I (Identical with SPAN 457)

462. Linguistics and the Study of Literature (3) II 1994-95
(Identical with ENGL 462) May be convened with 562.

463. Philosophy of Language (3) (Identical with PHIL 463) May be
convened with 563.

465. Pragmatics (3) II (Identical with PHIL 465) May be convened
with 565.

473. Natural Language Processing (3) I Introduction to the
processes underlying speech production and comprehension: speech
sounds, words, parsing, semantics and pragmatics. P, 101.
(Identical with PHIL 473 and PSYC 473) May be convened with 573.

474. Linguistic Perspectives on Mexican-American Spanish and
Bilingualism (3) I II (Identical with SPAN 474) May be convened
with 574.

476. Language in Culture (3) II (Identical with ANTH 476) May be
convened with 576.

477. Discourse and Text (3) II 1993-94 (Identical with ANTH 477)
May be convened with 577.

480. Historical Comparative Linguistics (3) I (Identical with
ANTH 480) May be convened with 580.

485. Linguistic and Computer-assisted Approaches to Literature
(3) [Rpt./6 units] II (Identical with GER 485). May be convened
with 585.

488. Computational Linguistics (3) I 1994-95 Fundamentals of
formal language theory; syntactic and semantic processing; the
place of world knowledge in natural language processing. P, 388
or a course in one of the following: formal languages, syntax,
data structures, or compilers. (Identical with C SC 488 and PSYC
488) May be convened with 588.

489. Areal Survey of Native North American Languages (3) I 1994-
95 (Identical with ANTH 489) May be convened with 589.

495. Colloquium
a. Linguistics (1) [Rpt./3] I II May be convened with 595a.

496. Seminar
c. Topics in Japanese Linguistics (3) [Rpt./2] II (Identical with
JPN 496c, which is the home) May be convened with 596c.

500. Linguistics for Nonmajors (3) II 1993-94 Conceptual
foundations, methodology, and current theoretical frameworks.
Students will carry out actual linguistic analysis. For students
in fields other than linguistics.

501. Formal Foundation of Linguistics (3) I A survey of the aims
of linguistic research and introduction to the basic mathematics
of formal linguistics; logic, sets, algebras, graphs, feature
structures, formal language theory.

502. Gender and Language in Japan (3) II 1994-95 (Identical with
JPN 502) May be convened with 402

503. Foundations of Syntactic Theory I (3) I For a description of
course topics, see 403. Graduate-level requirements include a
greater number of problems. May be convened with 403.

504. Government Binding Theory (3) II Continuation of 503,
focusing on government, control, binding, thematic relations, and
the theory of logical form.

505. Extended Categorial Grammar (3) II Continuation of 503,
exploring extensions of standard categorial grammar. Function and
argument, relationship between syntactic and semantic types,
functional composition and type-changing rules, application to
natural language structures.

510. Foundations of Phonological Theory I (3) I For a description
of course topics, see 410. Graduate-level requirements include a
greater number of problems. May be convened with 410.

511. Introduction to Japanese Linguistics (3) (Identical with JPN
511) May be convened with 411.

512. Advanced Japanese Linguistics (3) (Identical with JPN
512)May be convened with 412.

514. Foundations of Phonological Theory II (3) II Investigation
of the evidence and arguments for non-linear representations
(autosegmental and metrical) and of the organization of the
phonological component of grammar, including evidence for its
interaction with morphological structures and rules.

515. Phonological Phonetics (3) I 1994-95 Study of the acoustic
and articulatory properties of sounds and patterns of sounds that
occur in human language. Focus on the significance of the
properties of sounds for phonological theory, in particular,
distinctive feature theory. Role of psycho-acoustic studies as a
source of evidence for phonological theory.

519. Linguistic Structure of Modern Chinese (3) (Identical with
CHN 519) May be convened with 419.

520. Linguistic Structure of Modern Chinese (3) (Identical with
CHN 520) May be convened with 420.

522. Linguistic Semantics and Lexicology (3) II 1994-95 For a
description of course topics, see 422. Graduate-level
requirements include a greater number of assignments and a higher
level of performance. (Identical with PHIL 522) May be convened
with 422.

525. Language Variation (3) 1993-94 II For a description of
course topics, see 430. Graduate-level requirements include
mastery of the formalism, solving data-set problems, and a higher
level of performance. (Identical with ANTH 525) May be convened
with 425.

526. Introduction to Arabic Linguistics (3) II (Identical with
ARB 526) May be convened with 426.

535. Morphology (3) I Morphology is the internal structure of
words and the relationship between words and the syntactic,
phonological, and semantic properties of the units that include
them. Course work includes the development of morphological
theory.

536. Japanese Sociolinguistics (3) [Rpt./1] I (Identical with JPN
536) May be convened with 436.

540. Linguistic Change and Diachronic Theory (3) I 1993-94
Current theories in historical linguistics, including the study
of the mechanisms and consequences of language change and the
methods of linguistic reconstruction. Particular languages and
areas of linguistics vary with the instructor. (Identical with
NES 540)

544. Syntactic Analysis (3) I 1994-95  An examination of the
syntactic diversity presented by natural human languages and an
exploration of the issues that such diversity presents for
syntactic analysis. Topics include AUX, word order, constituency,
and subjects.

545a-545b. Structure of a Non-Western Language (3-3) [Rpt./2] For
a description of course topics, see 445a-445b. Graduate-level
requirements include a higher level of performance. (Identical
with AINS 545a-545b) May be convened with 445a-445b.

551. Language Acquisition (3) II (Identical with SP H 551) May be
convened with 451.

553. Lexical and Syntactic Development (3) I II (Identical with
PSYC 553)

562. Linguistics and the Study of Literature (3) II 1994-95
(Identical with ENGL 562) May be convened with 462.

563. Philosophy of Language (3) (Identical with PHIL 563) May be
convened with 463.

564. Formal Semantics (3) I Introduction to model-theoretic
investigations of natural language interpretation, including
coordination, quantification, referential relations, tense,
aspect and modality (Identical with PHIL 564)

565. Pragmatics (3) (Identical with PHIL 565) May be convened
with 465.

573. Natural Language Processing (3) I For a description of
course topics, see 473. Graduate-level requirements include a
greater number of assignments and a higher level of performance.
(Identical with PHIL 573 and PSYC 573) May be convened with 473.

574. Linguistic Perspectives on Mexican-American Spanish and
Bilingualism (3) I II (Identical with SPAN 574) May be convened
with 474.

576. Language in Culture (3) II (Identical with ANTH 576) May be
convened with 476.

577. Discourse and Text (3) II 1993-94 (Identical with ANTH 577)
May be convened with 477.

580. Historical Comparative Linguistics (3) I (Identical with
ANTH 580) May be convened with 480.

583. Sociolinguistics (3) I (Identical with ANTH 583)

585. Linguistic and Computer-assisted Approaches to Literature
(3) [Rpt./6 units] II (Identical with GER 585) May be convened
with 485.

588. Computational Linguistics (3) I For a description of course
topics, see 488. Graduate-level requirements include a greater
number of assignments and a higher level of performance.
(Identical with C SC 588 and PSYC 588) May be convened with 488.

589. Areal Survey of Native North American Languages (3) I 1994-
95 (Identical with ANTH 589) May be convened with 489.

595. Colloquium
a. Linguistics (1) [Rpt./3] I II May be convened with 495a.

596. Seminar
c. Topics in Japanese Linguistics (3) [Rpt./2] II (Identical with
JPN 596c, which is the home) May be convened with 496c.

600. Current Issues in Linguistic Research (3) [Rpt./2] I II
Current research in linguistics, with emphasis on relationships
among syntax, semantics, and phonology.

696. Seminar
a. Syntax and Semantics (3) [Rpt./2] I II
b. Topics in Phonological Theory (3) [Rpt./2] I II
d. Current Issues in Syntactic Theory (3) I II [Rpt./2]
f. Linguistic Investigations and Applications (3) I II [Rpt./2]
(Identical with COMM 696f and PSYC 696f)
h. Topics in Morphology (3) [Rpt./2] I II S

697. Workshop
a. Linguistic Theory (3) I Open to majors only.

 


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