The University of Arizona  1993-95 General Catalog

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Journalism (JOUR)
Franklin Building, Room 101M
(520) 621-5710

Professors Donald W. Carson, Abraham S. Chanin, Philip
Mangelsdorf (Emeritus), George W. Ridge, Jr., Jacqueline E.
Sharkey

Associate Professors Jim Patten, Head, Ford N. Burkhart, William
F. Greer, James W. Johnson

Assistant Professor Virginia Escalante

Lecturers C. Bickford Lucas

The department's program is designed to balance a student's
development in the theory and practice of journalism with an even
stronger emphasis on the humanities, arts and sciences. The
department offers instruction in the reporting, writing and
editing skills necessary for a journalism career along with in-
house internships for professional development. Courses are also
required to provide students with an understanding of
journalism's role in society. The department offers programs
combining the major in journalism with that in Oriental studies
or Latin American studies.

The department offers a major in journalism for the degrees of
Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts. For graduate admission and
degree requirements, consult the Graduate Catalog. A Bachelor of
Arts in Education with a teaching major in journalism also is
available.

The major in journalism: 26 units in addition to the general
education requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree described
in the College of Arts and Sciences section of this catalog. All
majors must take 205, 206, 208, 301, 302, 320, 413, 450 or 451
and 439 or 470. Students must complete one advanced course from
among JOUR 411, 412, 415, 417, 419, and 451. No more than 35
units of journalism will count toward the 125 units needed for
the degree. Journalism majors must complete at least 9 units in
English writing or literature in addition to freshman English.

The supporting minor: Students are strongly advised to minor or
obtain a second major in economics, English writing or
literature, history, political science, a modern language,
anthropology, psychology, sociology or the natural sciences.

The teaching major: 30 units, including 205, 206, 208, 301, 302,
320, 411 or 413; 450, 470.

The teaching minor: 20 units, including 205, 206, 301, 302, 421
or 422, and 470.

The department participates in the honors program.

The Arizona Journalism Institute: The department has a permanent
center for study and conference among professional journalists in
the state.

Freedom of the Press Award: Each year the department gives the
John Peter Zenger Award to a journalist whose professional work
has made an outstanding contribution to the preservation of
freedom of the press and the people's right to know.

Publications: The department publishes the local edition of The
Tombstone Epitaph; the bilingual South Tucson Independiente; and
The Pretentious Idea, a media review. In addition, students
report on state government and the legislature for community
newspapers. During the spring semester, the department awards the
Don Bolles Fellowship to permit one student to work in Phoenix
covering the legislature.

Guadalajara Exchange: Students interested in Latin American
reporting are offered a one-year exchange program with the School
of Journalism at the Autonomous University of Guadalajara in
Mexico.

The Department of Journalism is accredited by the Accrediting
Council on Education for Journalism and Mass Communications.

151. News in Mass Communications (3) I II Designed to acquaint
the nonjournalist with communications techniques used by
newspapers, wire services, information agencies, news magazines
and broadcast news; analysis of social and historical influence
on the news media.

195. Colloquium
a. Good and Bad News (1) II

205. Reporting the News (3) I II Gathering, evaluating, and
writing news. P, CR 208, First-year Composition, knowledge of
typing. Consult department before enrolling. (Identical with M AR
205)

206. Advanced Reporting (3) I II Comprehensive and accurate news
presentation, with emphasis on interview techniques and coverage
of major news stories. P, 205.

208. Law of the Press (3) I II Introduction to Freedom of
Expression. Responsibility of the media; libel; and laws
pertaining to broadcast and print journalism. (Identical with M
AR 208)

301. Photojournalism (2) I II Reporting and interpreting the news
through pictures.

302. Photojournalism Laboratory (1) I II Open to majors only. P,
CR 301.

320. Editing (2) I II Theory and techniques of copy editing and
headline writing; training on video display terminals. 1R, 3L. P,
208, 206 or CR. Department permission required.

362. Writing for Media (3) I II (Identical with M AR 362)

381. Reporting for Broadcast News (3) I (Identical with M AR 381)
396H. Honors Proseminar (3) II

403. Advanced Photojournalism (3) I II Reporting and interpreting
the news through photos, photo documentaries, and photo analysis.
Open to majors only. P, 301, 302. May be convened with 503.

405. The Study of News (3) I II Critical study and problem
analysis of the media. Field work may include publication of
conclusions. May be convened with 505.

406. Magazine Color Photography (3) S Techniques for taking and
editing color photographs to illustrate magazine articles.
Preparation of resumes and photo portfolios. Graduate-level
requirements include additional readings and two additional photo
assignments. Field trips. May be convened with 506.

411. News Features (3) I II Writing the basic news feature
article; specialized reporting and rewriting techniques. P, 206.
May be convened with 511. Writing-Emphasis Course. P,
Satisfaction of the upper-division writing-proficiency
requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis Courses" in the Academic
Policies and Graduation Requirements section of this catalog).

412. Reporting for Magazines (3) II Study of writing techniques
for magazines; analysis of in-depth features. Students will write
articles for publication. P, 206. May be convened with 512.
Writing-Emphasis Course. P, satisfaction of the upper-division
writing-proficiency requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis Courses"
in the Academic Policies and Graduation Requirements section of
this catalog).

413. Reporting Public Affairs (3) I II Study and practice of
newsgathering on executive, legislative, and judicial levels in
city, county, state and federal governments, with emphasis on
news sources and interpretive writing. P, 206, 208. May be
convened with 513. Writing-Emphasis Course. P, satisfaction of
the upper-division writing-proficiency requirement (see "Writing-
Emphasis Courses" in the Academic Policies and Graduation
Requirements section of this catalog).

414. The News Agency: Arizona News Service (1) [Rpt.] I II Role
and operations of the news agency, wire service or syndicate.
Class members will form staff of Arizona News Service to supply
client newspapers from bureaus in Tucson and Phoenix. Field
trips. P or CR, 411 or 413. May be convened with 514.

417. Sports News Writing (3) I Students will cover sports events
and write sports features. Interview and rewriting techniques. P,
206. May be convened with 517.

418. Travel Reporting (3) I II S Writing the basic feature
article; specialized reporting and rewriting techniques. P, 206
or consult department before enrolling. May be convened with 518.
Writing-Emphasis Course. P, satisfaction of the upper-division
writing-proficiency requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis Courses"
in the Academic Policies and Graduation Requirements of this
catalog.

419. Public Information Writing (3) I II S The history,
principles and techniques of public information, the relation
between news media and government, and the responsibilities of
government and other public information specialists. P, 206. May
be convened with 519.

421. Advanced Editing (3) II Study of layout and typography for
news, photographs, and feature articles in newspapers. P, 320.
May be convened with 521.

422. Publications Layout and Design (3) I Theory and practice of
layout, typography, and design for magazines. P, consult
department before enrolling. May be convened with 522.

439. Ethics and the News Media (3) I Analysis of ethical theory
and how it relates to journalists' roles and responsibilities in
a democratic society. Case studies involve questions of bias,
accuracy, privacy and national security. (Identical with LA S
439) May be convened with 539.

450. Community Journalism: The Tombstone Epitaph (3) [Rpt.] I II
Class members work as editorial staff to produce the local
newspaper for Tombstone, Arizona. Intensive study of problems and
responsibilities of community newspapers. P, 206, 208, 301,
discussion of preparation with instructor. May be convened with
550.

451. Community Journalism: El Independiente (3) [Rpt.] I II Class
members work as editorial staff to produce a publication for the
community of South Tucson. Intensive study of problems and
responsibilities of journalism. P, 206, 208, 301, discussion of
preparation with instructor. May be convened with 551.

470. The Press and Society (3) I II Critical study of press
performance in current affairs; changing requirements for
socially responsible and professional journalism in a democracy.
(Identical with M AR 470) May be convened with 570.

471. International Communications (3) I II Study of world news
systems, including newsgathering agencies, role of the foreign
correspondent, the foreign press, the factors influencing
international news flow. May be convened with 571.

496. Seminar
m. Directions in News Technology (3) [Rpt./1] S May be convened
with 596m.

502. Freedom of Expression (3) II Analysis of access and barriers
to information and communication at local, state, national and
international levels; intensive study of the legal relationship
between mass media and society. Open to majors only.

503. Advanced Photojournalism (3) I II For a description of
course topics, see 403. Graduate-level requirements include an
intensive photo essay illustrating a social problem unique to the
Southwest. Open to majors only. P, 301, 302. May be convened with
403.

505. The Study of News (3) I II [Rpt] For a description of course
topics, see 405. Graduate-level requirements include a major
research paper on an aspect of the subject matter. May be
convened with 405.

506. Magazine Color Photography (3) S For a description of course
topics, see 406. Graduate-level requirements include additional
readings and two additional photo assignments. Field trips. May
be convened with 406.

511. News Features (3) I II For a description of course topics,
see 411. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth profile
of an Arizona newsmaker. P, 206. May be convened with 411.

512. Reporting for Magazines (3) II For a description of course
topics, see 412. Graduate-level requirements include a major
article demonstrating proficiency in the use of fiction-writing
techniques used in non-fiction. P, 206. May be convened with 412.

513. Reporting Public Affairs (3) I II For a description of
course topics, see 413. Graduate-level requirements include
identification, through study and interviews, of a major Tucson
issue and completion of a series of articles that suggest
resolution of the issue. P, 206, 502. May be convened with 413.

514. The News Agency: Arizona News Service (1) [Rpt.] I II For a
description of course topics, see 414. Graduate-level
requirements include a research paper. Field trips. P or CR, 411
or 413. May be convened with 414.

517. Sports News Writing (3) I For a description of course
topics, see 417. Graduate-level requirements include a research
paper concentrating on issues raised in class. P, 206. May be
convened with 417.

518. Travel Reporting (3) I II S For a description of course
topics, see 418. Graduate-level requirements include a research
project of student's own choosing involving a travel report and
extra magazine-length travel article. P, 206 or consult
department before enrolling. May be convened with 418.

519. Public Information Writing (3) I II S For a description of
course topics, see 419. Graduate-level requirements include a
research paper. P, 206. May be convened with 419.

521. Advanced Editing (3) II For a description of course topics,
see 421. Graduate-level requirements include assuming leadership
positions such as news editor or copydesk chief during lab
simulations. P, 320. May be convened with 421.

522. Publications Layout and Design (3) I For a description of
course topics, see 422. Graduate-level requirements include
critically analyzing a major publication and redesigning it
according to newest principles. P, consult department before
enrolling. May be convened with 422.

539. Ethics and the News Media (3) I For a description of course
topics, see 439. Graduate-level requirements include a research
paper examining a major ethical issue and providing a critique
regarding how the media resolved the issue. (Identical with LA S
539) May be convened with 439.

550. Community Journalism: The Tombstone Epitaph (3) [Rpt.] I II
For a description of course topics, see 450. Graduate-level
requirements include assuming leadership roles, such as city
editor or news editor, on the newspaper. P, 206, 208, 301,
discussion of preparation with instructor. May be convened with
450.

551. Community Journalism: El Independiente (3) [Rpt.] I II For a
description of course topics, see 451. Graduate-level
requirements include assuming leadership roles, such as city
editor or news editor, on the publication. P, 206, 208, 301,
discussion of preparation with instructor. May be convened with
451.

570. The Press and Society (3) I II For a description of course
topics, see 470. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth
research paper addressing a modern media problem and proposing a
solution to it. May be convened with 470.

571. International Communications (3) I II For a description of
course topics, see 471. Graduate students will be required to
complete one extra research paper. May be convened with 471.

596. Seminar
a. History of the Press (3) I II
h. Latin-American Press (3) I II (Identical with LA S 596h)
i. News Analysis (3) I II
m. Directions in News Technology (3) [Rpt./1] S May be convened
with 496m.

 


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