The University of Arizona  1993-95 General Catalog

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Family and Consumer Resources
(FCR/MCS/FS/HE E/I D/COUN)
FCR Building, Room 205
(520) 621-1075

Professors Victor A. Christopherson (Emeritus), Interim Director, 
Oscar C. Christensen, Roger J. Daldrup (Emeritus), Kathryn L.
Hatch, James R. Hine (Adjunct), Jean Ruley Kearns (Emerita), Amy
Jean Knorr (Emerita), Doris E. Manning (Emerita), Shirley O'Brien
(Adjunct), Naomi A. Reich (Emerita), Associate Director, Robert
R. Rice, Carl A. Ridley, David C. Rowe

Associate Professors Ellen Goldsberry, Associate Director FCR
Extension Programs, Donna R. Iams, Maureen E. Kelly, Roger M.
Kramer, Philip J. Lauver (Emeritus), Jessica Lazarus (Adjunct),
Mary H. Marion (Emerita), Betty J. Newlon, Soyeon Shim, Angela
Taylor, Mari S. Wilhelm

Assistant Professors Donna H. Christensen, James E. Deal, Mary
Ann Eastlick, Daniel J. Flannery, Wendy Gamble, Lynn Lyon, Susan
B. Silverberg

Extension Specialists Sherry L. Betts, Lawrence M. Sullivan,
Shirley Jo Taylor, Frank R. Williams

Lecturer Oscar Blasquez, Chet J. Ross

Adjunct Professors James R. Hine, Shirley O'Brien

Adjunct Associate Professor Jessica Lazarus

Adjunct Instructor Ruth Ann Fowler

The School of Family and Consumer Resources provides
instructional, research, extension and outreach programs that
enable families, individual family members and consumers to
achieve an optimum quality of life throughout the lifespan.
Instructional programs prepare professionals for careers serving
families and consumers in a culturally diverse and rapidly
changing society.

The undergraduate program has as its major objectives: (1)
specialization in various aspects of Family and Consumer
Resources, in preparation for professional positions, and (2)
courses to enrich the professional preparation of students in
other colleges.

The school is organized into two divisions, Family Studies and
Merchandising and Consumer Studies, and two program areas,
Counseling and Guidance and Interior Design.

The school offers the Bachelor of Science in Family and Consumer
Resources with majors in family studies (emphasizing human
development, and interpersonal relations) or family life
education; family and consumer resources; home economics
education; interior design; and merchandising and consumer
studies.

Interior design is being phased out. No new majors are being
accepted. Faculty and some element of the interior design program
have been transferred to Architecture. Students interested in the
area should contact the College of Architecture.

Graduate degree programs offered by the School of Family and
Consumer Resources include the Master of Arts with a major in
counseling and guidance; the Master of Science with a major in
family and consumer resources or home economics education; the
Master of Education with a major in family and consumer
resources; and the Master of Home Economics Education with a
major in home economics education. For the Master of Science
degree with a major in family and consumer resources, and
concentrations are available in family studies; consumer studies;
merchandising; and home economics education. The school also
offers the Doctor of Philosophy with a major in family and
consumer resources. Emphases are available in consumer studies;
human development, interpersonal relationships and family
resource management. For further information, consult the
Graduate Catalog.

Students enrolled in majors in Family and Consumer Resources may
select a minor subject area with the approval of the student's
advisor.

Family and Consumer Resources (FCR)

The major in Family and Consumer Resources combines three
disciplines into a coherent and intellectually challenging major.
Designing the major requires that the student (a) prepare a
written proposal, (b) meet with an advisor, (c) have a final
proposal accepted, and (d) receive an advisor's signature. Each
student will select two subject areas (21 units each) from within
FCR. The student will select a third subject area within FCR or
outside of FCR. All applications must be submitted to an FCR
committee for approval.

195. Colloquium
a. Individual Development and Academic Success (1) I

197. Workshop 
a. The Science of Human Development (1) S Field trip. Open to
participants in the Horizons Unlimited Summer Program.

297. Workshop 
a. Self and the World of Work (1) I II
b. Student Executive Training in Higher Education (2) II
c. Student Assistant in College Residence Halls (1) I

465. Women in International Development (3) II (Identical with
ANTH 465) May be convened with 565.

565. Women in International Development (3) II (Identical with
ANTH 565) May be convened with 465.

696. Seminar 
z. Family and Consumer Resources (1-3) [Rpt./1] I II

Division of Merchandising and Consumer Studies (MCS)
S. Shim,  Chair

The Merchandising and Consumer Studies Division offers a program
of professional education preparing students for careers in the
fast changing merchandising institutions that serve families and
individual consumers in a global society. The purpose of the
undergraduate curriculum in the MCS major is to provide a broad
education to prepare the students not only for their professional
careers but also for their responsible citizenship and leadership
roles in society.

The MCS major coursework, concentrated in the upper-division
portion of the degree program, focuses on the effective and
efficient delivery of products and services to consumers through
four core components of the program; products and services
environment, business environment, visual and aesthetic
environment, and consumer and global environment.

Prior to the upper-division standing, students are encouraged to
complete a basic foundation of general education, including
course work in communications, mathematics, physical and
environmental science, arts, literature and language, the social
and behavioral sciences, and world civilization.

It is important for students to note that they are required to
meet the advancec upper-division standing requirement (a
cumulative grade-point average of 2.6 or above) in merchandising
and consumer studies to establish eligibility for the upper-
division level courses in the major. Also important is to note
the advanced standing requirements (a cumulative grade-point
average of 2.75 or above) required by the College of Business and
Public Administration to eestablish eligibility for the upper-
division level business courses.

Any course work that might be applicable to the upper-division
professional core or major requirements taken while enrolled in
other colleges or at other universities is subject to acceptance
by the School of Family and Consumer Resources for degree
certification purposes.

The major in merchandising and consumer studies: Majors must
complete five general education study areas, as described in the
College of Agriculture section of this catalog (see school
advising sheets for specific requirements for study areas); as
well as completing ENGL 101 or 103H; 102 or 104H; COMM 112; HE E
428; ENGL 307; MATH 117R/S; MIS 111 or approved course. Major
requirements include: MCS 114, 115, 284, 304, 315, 310, 458 or
346, 384, 440, 434 or 454; 6 units from MCS 434, 376, or 454,
AREC 446, FS 337, 466; PSYC 101; ACCT 200; MKTG 361, or 450 or
452 or 456 (first two MKTG courses are required; students can
choose from second group); and 9 units from ACCT, FIN, MAP 305,
320, 330.

114. Introduction to Merchandising (3) I II The processes
involved in moving apparel and related consumer products from
development through the wholesale and retail system.

115. Fundamentals of Design (3) I Theory and exploration of
design elements and principles; historical aspects and
contemporary trends. Open to MCS and L AR majors only or consult
department before enrolling.

214. Introduction to Consumer Affairs (3) II Overview of the
problems and issues facing consumers and roles of consumer
affairs professionals. P, 114 or CR.

284. Textile Science (4) I Scientific theory concerning fibers,
yarn, fabric construction and finishes; use of scientific data
related to selection, use and care. P, CHEM 101a, 102a, or PHYS
102a, 180a.

304. Merchandising Analysis (3) I II Development of merchandising
policies and procedures used in retailing with emphasis on retail
mathematics. P, 284, ACCT 200.

310. Consumer Economics (3) II (Identical with AREC 310)

315. Merchandising Promotion (3) II Activities used to influence
sale of merchandise and services to promote trends and ideas;
promotional plans including advertising, visual display, special
events and publicity. P, 114.

335. Hard Goods Product Evaluation (3) I (Identical with I D 335)

346. Textiles and Apparel in the International Economy (3) II
Domestic and international economics of the textile and apparel
industries with emphasis on production, distribution, and global
setting. Current and future international and domestic issues and
problems are included. P, ECON 201a or 201b.

354. Soft Goods Product Evaluation (3) II Understanding of the
product characteristics (as price, quality, design, and other
attributes) and their relationship to the retail establishment
and the target customer. P, 114, 284.

376. Consumer Problems (3) II The buyer-seller relationship, with
emphasis on consumer problems, the consumer movement, and
business and consumer rights and responsibilities.

384. Professional Development (3) I II Preparation for internship
programs, development of roles, responsibilities, and standards
for business and industry personnel. P, 114. Writing-Emphasis
Course.*

388. Design for Living (3) S Elements and principles of interior
design; planning for space, personal lifestyle, and budget;
lighting, color, materials, and furnishings; designed for
nonmajors.

411. Consumer Issues in Nutrition (3) S (Identical with N FS 411)

434. Strategic Merchandise Management (3) II Application of
retail planning and control procedures with emphasis on
development and evaluation of retail strategies. P, 315, 458,
MKTG 361 or CR. May be convened with 534.

440. Consumer Concepts and Theory (3) I Theories of consumer
choice and use of apparel and related consumer products. P, 304,
MKTG 361, a statistics course, and senior standing. May be
convened with 540.

454. New Developments in the Textile Field (3) I Fabric finishes,
new fiber development, textured yarns, knits and fabric use and
care problems. P, 284. May be convened with 554.

455. Visual Merchandising and Display (3) I S All aspects of
displaying merchandise, including window display, interior
display, color and lighting techniques, line and composition,
three-dimensional presentation, fixtures and systems, planning
and layout, scheduling and promotion. P, 115 or ART 101. May be
convened with 555.

456. Store Planning and Design (3) II Studies the retail
environment, taking into account all the physical and
psychological effects that initiate and motivate customer
activity. 2R, 3L. P, 455. May be convened with 556.

458. Retailing Management (3) I II (Identical with MKTG 458)

507. Research Methods in Merchandising and Consumer Studies (3)
II Research literature, methods, techniques, and procedures for
conducting research, and analysis and interpretation of data. P,
3 units of graduate statistics.

534. Strategic Merchandise Management (3) II For a description of
course topics, see 434. Graduate-level requirements include
testing on additional references on appropriate topics and
completion of three projects. P, 304, MKTG 361. May be convened
with 434.

540. Consumer Concepts and Theory (3) I For a description of
course topics, see 440. Graduate-level requirements include
reading and developing weekly briefs of research articles in the
literature on consumer behavior for presentations in class, tests
on supplemental readings, and a term paper 10 pages longer and
including 20 additional academic references than those required
of undergraduates. May be convened with 440.

554. New Developments in the Textile Field (3) I For a
description of course topics, see 454. Graduate-level
requirements include a research report suitable for publication
and an oral presentation. P, 284. May be convened with 454.

555. Visual Merchandising and Display (3) I S For a description
of course topics, see 455. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research paper on a design-related aspect or issue. P,
115 or ART 101. May be convened with 455.

556. Store Planning and Design (3) II For description of course
topics, see 456. Graduate requirements include in-depth research
paper. May be convened with 456.

606. International Consumption and Retailing (3) I 1994-95
Understanding of international market environment and retailing
structure, system, issues and trends in the contemporary global
market; analysis of cultural, social, legal, political influence
on international consumption pattern and retailing process.
Developing retailing strategies on a global basis.

607. Topics in Merchandising and Retailing (3) [Rpt./6 units] II
1993-94 Analysis of current major topics or issues facing
merchandising and retailing industries. P, 540, 606.

608. Topics in Consumer Issues and Psychology (3) I 1993-94
Exploration of new topics, critical examination of current
literature and selectively distributed research reports and
analysis of studies in consumer issues and psychology. P,
graduate statistics and/or research methods.

634. Retail Merchandising Analysis (3) I 1993-94 Analysis of
current literature and case studies of major issues facing retail
management. P, 3 units statistics, 3 units research methods.

656. Consumer Socialization (3) S An analysis of the process by
which consumers acquire consumption-related skills, cognition,
knowledge, attitudes, and behavior from a life-cycle perspective.
P, 440/540.

676. Advanced Consumer Theories and Issues (3) II 1994-95
Analysis of theories and issues relating to the study of the
consumer. P, 608.

Division of Family Studies
D. Rowe, Division Chair

The division of family studies offers two majors; family studies
and home economics education. The major in family studies focuses
on generation and dissemination of basic and applied knowledge
concerned with human development and family relations throughout
the life span. Students may elect courses in consultation with
faculty members to reflect an emphasis in human development,
interpersonal relations, or family life education. The major in
home economics education leads to certification for teaching in
public schools. Candidates for admission to undergraduate
programs in home economics education must present evidence of
having completed 56 units of work applicable to the Bachelor of
Science degree in Family and Consumer Resources. Home economics
education majors will not be allowed to register for 300- or 400-
level home economics education or College of Education courses
until successful completion of the writing proficiency exam.

The major in family studies: Majors must complete five general
education study areas as described in the College of Agriculture
section of this catalog (see school advising sheets for specific
requirements for study areas); as well as completing ENGL 101 or
103H, 102 or 104H; ENGL 308; ACL, 3 units; MATH 117R/S; MIS 111.
All majors must satisfy a common set of core courses: FS 117,
137, 223, 337; upper-division FS course (not included in
concentration); PSYC 230 and 290 or SOC 375a and 375b. In
addition to the required core, the student must complete specific
courses required of each concentration: human development:  FS
357, 377, 407, 413, 447, 457; N FS 101; ANTH 310; PSYC 414 or
415; interpersonal relations:  FS 316 or 357 or 413; 427 or 423;
423 or 457, 487; FS 466; COMM 100; 104 and 417, SOC 321; PSYC
300; ANTH 200 or 403 or 419; JPN 402; 15-18 units should be
chosen from the following areas: anthropology, education, family
studies, counseling and guidance, family and consumer resources,
psychology, management and policy (MAP 426, PA 457), sociology,
and finance; family life education concentration: HE E 288, 338g,
408, 493; FS 347, 357, 377, 413; HLTH 330; PHIL 113; PA 206 OR
221; ANTH 310, 420.

The division offers the minor in family studies. Students
complete FS 117, 137 and 223. In consultation with an advisor,
students take 11-12 additional units of 300 and 400 level courses
that meet their needs and objectives.

The major in home economics education: Majors must have a minimum
grade-point average of 2.5, pass the College of Education
designated admission test, and complete five general education
study areas, as described in the College of Agriculture section
of this catalog (see school advising sheets for specific
requirements for study areas); as well as completing ENGL 101 or
103H; 102 or 104H; HE E 428, plus 3 additional communications
units; MATH 117R/S; 3 units of computer skills from an approved
list. Major requirements include: ED P 310; EDUC 350; LRC 435; HE
E 288, 338g, 408, 409, 489; FS 117, 137, 223, 337, 347, 357, 377
or ED P 402; FCR 114, 284; ID 388, 365; SER elective, and N FS
101.

Family Studies (FS)

117. Human Development and Relations (3) I II Behavioral science
approach to human development through the life span.

137. Life Span Family Relations (3) I II Behavioral science
approach to family development through the life span.

223. Child Development (3) I II Growth, development, and
socialization of the child within the family setting, from
conception to the middle school years; observations of infants
and preschoolers. P, PSYC 101.

316. Social and Financial Stressors in Families (3) I 1993-94
Study of the impact of normative and non-normative family life
transitions on individuals and families, with emphasis on related
social and financial stressors. Course content will include
theoretical perspectives on current literature relevant to the
study of family life stressors. P, 137.

337. Dynamics of Family Relations (3) I II The modern family and
its relationships with emphasis on marriage and interpersonal
relationships. P, 137.

347. Child Development in Group Settings (3) I Laboratory
experience with young children. Supervised experience with 3-5
year-old children in a group setting; interactions, observations,
discussions. 2R, 3L. P, 223.

357. Parent-Child Relationships (3) II Theoretical perspectives
of current literature relevant to the study of parent-child
relationships from the transition to parenthood through
adulthood. P, 117, 223.

377. Adolescence (3) I Growth, development and socialization of
the child from the middle school years through adolescence. P,
117, PSYC 101.

403. Advanced Adolescent Development (3) II (Identical with ED P
403) May be convened with 503.

407. Problems in Child Development (3) II Special child-rearing
contexts in contemporary society; poverty, minority group
membership, social change, and special developmental
considerations. P, 223.

413. Issues in Aging (3) II Introduction to gerontology, with
emphasis upon contemporary issues. (Identical with GERO 413).

423. Socio-Cultural Context of Human Development (3) II
Examination of the social and cultural contexts of individual
development, including family, community, peers, school, and
ethnic groups as well as the influence of social class and
economic conditions. Special attention will be given to
socialization and development of ethnic-American children and
adolescents. P, 117. (Identical with ED P 423). May be convened
with 523. Writing-Emphasis Course.*

427. Problems in Marriage and the Family (3) I Identification and
analysis of major problem areas in marriage and the family,
including economic, sexual, role conflict, emotional disorders,
and childrearing. P, 137.

447. Advanced Child Development (3) I In-depth examination of
various dimensions of human growth and development. P, 223; 6
units of PSYC. May be convened with 547. Writing-Emphasis
Course.*

457. Bio-Social Determinants of Socialization (3) II Bio-social
factors, including genetic influences, related to human
development, socialization, and cross-cultural patterns of
behavior. P, 223; 6 units of child dev. or SOC or PSYC (Identical
with SOC 457) Writing-Emphasis Course*

466. Family Economics (3) I Analysis of the family as an
economic-decision-making unit within the larger economic system.
P, ECON 201b. May be convened with 566.

477. Genetic Basis of Normal and Deviant Traits (3) II Explores
methods of studying genetic influences on human traits and
summarizes research findings on normal traits, such as
sociability and IQ, and on deviant traits such as criminality.
Implications for the fields of family studies, sociology, and
psychology are considered. May be convened with 577.

487. Advanced Family Relations (3) II Critical analysis of
selected studies and current research in family relations. P,
337, or SOC 321. May be convened with 587. Writing-Emphasis
Course*

*Writing-Emphasis Courses. P, Satisfaction of the  upper-division
writing-proficiency requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis Courses"
in the Academic Policies and Graduation Requirements section of
this catalog).

500. Life Span Development (3) II (Identical with ED P 500).

503. Advanced Adolescent Development (3) II (Identical with ED P
503) May be convened with 403.

507a-507b. Research Methods in Family Studies (3-3) 507a: I
Design issues of general relevance to behavioral research. 507b:
I Design issues of particular relevance to family and
developmental research. Both 507a and 507b are offered in the
fall semester only.

523. Socio-Cultural Context of Human Development (3) II For
description of course topics, see 423. Graduate-level
requirements include a review of research literature. (Identical
with ED P 523). May be convened with 423. 

537. Analysis of Family Studies (3) I An analysis of major
research topics; critical resources relevant to graduate
training; and ethical/professional issues related to the conduct
of research.

547. Advanced Child Development (3) I For a description of course
topics, see 447. Graduate-level requirements include additional
assignments. P, 223; 6 units of PSYC May be convened with 447.

557. Methods in Marital Therapy (3) I Theories and principles of
counseling for premarital, marital, and group counseling
situations. (Identical with COUN 557)

566. Family Economics (3) I For a description of course topics,
see 466. Graduate-level requirements include extra required
readings and an in-depth term paper. P, ECON 201b. May be
convened with 466.

567. Theories of Human Development (3) II Analysis of major
paradigms and world views influencing the study of human
development. Overview of key issues and controversies arising in
the field as well as evaluations of specific theories and
specific theorists.

573. Theories of the Family (3) II Major theories of the family
to include theory construction, historical roots of family
theories, and classic and contemporary family theories. P, 9
units of family studies, psychology or sociology.

577. Genetic Basis of Normal and Deviant Traits (3) II For a
description of course topics, see 477. Graduate-level
requirements include  a research proposal or paper. May be
convened with 477.

587. Advanced Family Relations (3) II For a description of course
topics, see 487. Graduate-level requirements include extra
required readings and an in-depth term paper. P, 337, or SOC 321.
May be convened with 487.

607. Topics in Family Studies (1 to 3) [Rpt./3] I II Variable
content: cognitive development, biological theories of
development, role theory, middle childhood, and others.

613. Issues in Aging (3) II 1994-95 Critical analysis of selected
family and social issues, and related current research in
gerontology. (Identical with GERO 613)

636. Economics of Aging (3) I Analysis of economic issues and
policies as they affect the aging individual, family and society.
(Identical with GERO 636)

637. Trends in Human Relations (3) Philosophy, content, and
resources for understanding, teaching and working in the field of
human relations.

646. Theories of Family Economic Behavior (3) I Analysis of
theories relevant to family economic behavior including theories
on poverty, economic well-being, family systems, and decision
making. Emphasis on social psychological concepts.

Home Economics Education (HE E)

288. Observation/Participation in Home Economics and Family Life
Education (3) I 1994-95 Functions of home economics educators in
school- and community-based programs; characteristics of home
economics programs; structuring learning settings to meet
student/client needs. 1R, 3L. 

338g. Teaching Home Economics (4) I (Identical with TTE 338g)
Writing-Emphasis Course*

*Writing-Emphasis Courses. P, Satisfaction of the upper-division
writing-proficiency requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis Courses"
in the Academic Policies and Graduation Requirements section of
this catalog).

408. Curriculum Decisions in Home Economics and Family Life
Education (3) II 1994-95 Bases for and processes in developing
home economics programs for schools and communities. P, TTE 338g;
CR, HE E 489.

409. Occupational Home Economics Programs (3) I 1993-94 Purposes
and methods of teaching home economics-related occupations, with
emphasis on cooperative home economics vocational education. P,
CR, TTE 338g. May be convened with 509.

411. Consumer Issues in Nutrition (3) S (Identical with N FS 411)

428. Professional Presentations and Techniques (3) I II Theory
and practice of educational techniques in non-formal settings in
positions in business, government and human services. 2R, 3L. May
be convened with 528.

439. Non-Formal Education (3) II (Identical with A ED 439) May be
convened with 539.

489. Supervised Teaching in Home Economics (1-12) II Teaching
vocational home economics under supervision in approved programs
in secondary schools in Arizona. Preregistration first semester
of the junior year. P, TTE 338g; CR, HE E 408. 

493. Internship 
e. Supervised Work Experience in Home Economics (1 to 6) [Rpt./2]
II Open to home economics education majors only.

509. Occupational Home Economics Programs (3) I 1993-94 For a
description of course topics, see 409. Graduate-level
requirements include developing two evaluation instruments (one
affective and one psychomotor) and developing two sets of
teaching materials, e.g., job training manual. P, CR, TTE 338g.
May be convened with 409.

528. Professional Presentations and Techniques (3) I II For a
description of course topics, see 428. Graduate-level
requirements include a paper and a 30 to 45-minute presentation
on a topic from the outline. In addition, graduate students must
design an educational program tailor-made to their interest. May
be convened with 428.

539. Non-Formal Education (3) II (Identical with A ED 539) May be
convened with 439.

597. Workshop
d. Administration, Management, and Supervision of Non-formal
Education (1) [Rpt./3] I II (Identical with A ED 597d, which is
home)
g. Computer Application in Agricultural and Non-formal Education
(1) [Rpt./3] I II (Identical with A ED 597g, which is home) 
h. Family Development through Home Economic Programs (1-2)
n. Environmental Education in Agriculture (1) [Rpt./3] I II
(Identical with A ED 597n, which is home)
t. Developments in Non-formal Education (1) [Rpt./3] I II
(Identical with A ED 597t, which is home) 

607. Topics in Home Economics Education (1-3) [Rpt./12 units] II
S  Philosophy, content, and resources for understanding,
teaching, and working in home economics education.

609. Supervision in Vocational Education and Extension (3) II
1994-95 Theory, principles and techniques of supervision in
vocational and extension education.

610. Investigation and Studies in Home Economics (3) I Study and
analysis of research literature, methods, techniques, and
procedures for conducting investigations, selecting and
developing plans for research problems.

628. Curriculum Theory in Home Economics (3) II 1994-95
Theoretical bases and processes of curriculum building in home
economics; current issues in home economics education.

Interior Design (I D)

This program is being phased out. No new majors are being
accepted. Faculty and some element of the interior design program
have been transferred to Architecture. Students interested in the
area should contact the College of Architecture.

The major in interior design: Majors must complete five general
education study areas, as described in the College of Agriculture
section of this catalog (see school advising sheets for specific
requirements for study areas); as well as completing ENGL 101 or
103H; 102 or 104H; COMM 112; ENGL 307; MATH 117R/S; MIS 111.
Major requirements include: 275, 355, 375, 475, 485, 488; MCS
284; ARCH 101; 3 units selected from I D 345; I D 365, 385, 405;
MKTG 361; PSYC 371, 427; EXSS (2 units); FCR upper-division
course from outside the major.

335. Hard Goods Product Evaluation (3) I Study of the hard goods
industry including terminology, characteristics, patterns of
product and distribution, analysis techniques and the market. P,
275, ART 101. (Identical with MCS 335)

345. Interior Perspective (3) S Application of various one-point
perspectives in interior design. Use of techniques such as
pencil, ink, color pencils and markers applied to interior
perspective for presentation as well as use of sketches and
furniture perspectives. P, drafting course. 

355. History of Design (3) I Period styles in interiors and
furniture, ancient to the 20th century. P, 6 units of art
history, HIST 101, 102 or 8 units of HUM 250a-250b-250c. Writing-
Emphasis Course*

365. Housing (3) II Human needs in housing; housing structure;
and construction practices. Field trips. P, junior standing.

375. Private Space Design (4) I Design of residential
environments for individual or family use applying knowledge of
interior materials, furnishings, and human factors. P, 335, 355.

385. Computer Aided Drafting (3) II Introduction to the basic
concepts of computer graphics and the basic set-up and operation
of a computer graphics system.  Assignments, design problems, and
final interior design project included. 1R, 4S. For majors only.
P, MIS 111.

405. Barrier Free Design (3) II Current research in architecture,
interior design, product design, physical therapy, behavioral
science and rehabilitation  reviewed and applied in design
problem-solving. P, 9 units of Individuals, Societies and
Institutions courses. May be convened with 505.

435. Advanced Computer Aided Design (3) I An advanced course
using the computer to create sophisticated presentation drawings.
Projects exploring potential applications in computer aided
design/drafting with emphasis on 3D modeling and isometric
drawing. 1R, 2S. P, 385. Open to majors only.

475. Public Space Design (4) I Studio projects with specific
focus on interior environments designated for public usage.
Includes programming, design development, project documentation
and organization, working drawings and presentation techniques.
P, 375, 385. May be convened with 575.

485. Ethics and Practice for Interior Design (3) II Readings in
the interior fields, with emphasis on ethics, business
organization, communication and professional development.
Includes study of billing and fee structures; writing proposals,
contracts, specifications; and highlights various career tracks
associated with the design profession. P, 475. May be convened
with 585.

488. Advanced Public Space Design (4) II Studio projects with
special focus on large-scale multifunction public space
environments; design development by teams. P, 475. May be
convened with 588.

*Writing-Emphasis Courses. P, Satisfaction of the  upper-division
writing-proficiency requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis Courses"
in the Academic Policies and Graduation Requirements section of
this catalog).

505. Barrier Free Design (3) II  For a description of course
topics, see 405. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth
research paper on a design-related aspect or issue. May be
convened with 405.

575. Public Space Design (4) I For a description of course
topics, see 475. Graduate-level requirements include projects
that require actual clients and budgets. P, 275, 385. May be
convened with 475.

585. Ethics and Practice for Interior Design (3) II For a
description of course topics, see 485. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth research study of local
dealerships and designers' studies relative to major products
available, discount structure offered, and design fees. An
evaluation of three manufacturers' similar products is also
required. P, 375. May be convened with 485.

588. Advanced Public Space Design (4) II For a description of
course topics, see 488. Graduate-level requirements include
applications of current researched information to an actual
design project and client. P, 575. May be convened with 488.

Counseling and Guidance (COUN)

The program area of counseling and guidance offers professional
preparation in community and mental health counseling. This
program is under review; please consult the School of Family and
Consumer Resources for information.

401. Basic Skills in Counseling (3) S Selected counseling skills
and their applications to noncounseling settings.  Designed for
nonmajors needing basic skills in counseling as an adjunct to
other primary occupational functions. P, 6 units of social
science.

403. Principles of Adlerian Psychology (3) S Techniques for the
study of human behavior; implications for improving adult-child
relationships, with emphasis on Adlerian principles. P, 6 units
of social science. 

421. Techniques of Interviewing (3) I II S Types and functions,
process, and application of the interview in various settings. P,
6 units of social science.

503. Principles of Adlerian Psychology (3) I For a description of
course topics, see 403. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional research paper dealing with a theoretical aspect of
Adlerian psychology. 

550. Counseling and Human Sexuality (3) S Sexual function,
dysfunction, and disorders in context of individual and couple;
interview techniques and intervention strategies. P, 6 units of
counseling or related area.

555. Addictions Counseling (3) S An analysis of issues in
addictions counseling ranging from various theoretical positions,
information regarding diagnosis of addictive personality,
treatment programs, and research P, 6 units of counseling or
related area.

557. Methods in Marital Therapy (3) I (Identical with FS 557)

570. Counseling the Adult (3) I Adult crisis, midlife changes and
developmental patterns; counseling techniques and intervention
strategies. P, 6 units of counseling or related area.

571. Counseling Women (3) II Examination of the counseling needs
of contemporary women and current types of intervention designed
to meet these needs. P, 6 units of counseling or related area.
(Identical with W S 571)

597. Workshop
d. Counseling Children and Adolescents (3) S 
f. Professional Relationships: Building Cooperation and Mediating
Conflict (3) I S
j. Anger, Depression and Guilt (3) S P, 6 units of counseling or
related area.
k. Psychodrama (3) S P, 6 units of counseling or related area.
m. Counseling Mexican Americans (3) I S (Identical with SER 597m)

601. Foundations of Counseling (3) I Relationship and
contributions of various fields to the work of the counselor at
all levels, in current and historical perspective; derivation of
principles and objectives; integrated lab. experience in selected
settings. Open to majors only.

622. Appraisal of the Individual (3) I Methods of appraising and
reporting individual behavior, with emphasis on nonpsychometric
data. Open to majors only.

623. Testing in Counseling (3) I Evaluation and selection of
psychological tests for guidance; use of psychometric data in
counseling. Open to majors only.

631. Career Counseling (3) I Theories of vocational development;
types, sources, and use of occupational and educational
information in career counseling and decision  making. P, 601 or
CR.

644. The Counseling Process (3) II Introduction to theories of
counseling; collation and interpretation of counseling data; the
counseling process; study of cases. P, 601, 622.

645. Theories of Counseling (3) II Rationale, development, and
research underlying major counseling theories. P, 631, 644.

647. Premarriage and Marriage Counseling (3) I Contemporary
issues, concepts, and procedures in premarriage and marriage
counseling.  P, 622.

648. Procedures in Family Counseling (1 to 3) II Theory and
process in family counseling; problem solving techniques applied
to parent-child conflict; lab. experience. P, 403.

649. Procedures in Marriage Counseling (3) S Application of
counseling theory and techniques to the diagnosis of marital
relationship and strategies for behavior change. P, 403, 601,
622.

672. Cross-Cultural Counseling (3) II Issues, research and
procedures involved in counseling with culturally different
persons. Open to majors only. P, 601, 622.

683. Group Counseling (3) I Theory and process in group
counseling; applications in community and mental health settings;
lab. experience. P, 644.

696. Seminar
e. Ethics and Professional Practice (3) I Open to majors only. P,
601, 622, 644.
r. Issues in Counseling Research (3) I Open to major only. P,
601, 622, and 623 or 631.

 


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