The University of Arizona  1993-95 General Catalog

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GEOSCIENCES (GEOS)
Gould-Simpson Building, Room 208
(520) 621-6024

Professors Clement G. Chase, Head, Victor R. Baker, William B.
Bull, Robert F. Butler, Peter J. Coney, Paul E. Damon (Emeritus),
George H. Davis, Stanley N. Davis (Emeritus), William R.
Dickinson (Emeritus), Michael J. Drake (Planetary Sciences), Karl
W. Flessa, Jibamitra Ganguly, Laurence M. Gould (Emeritus), John
M. Guilbert (Emeritus), C. Vance Haynes, Charles W. Kreitler
(Hydrology and Water Resources), Gerhard O.W. Kremp (Emeritus),
Everett H. Lindsay, Austin Long, Paul S. Martin (Emeritus), Edgar
J. McCullough, Jr., H.J. Melosh (Planetary Sciences), Bartholomew
S. Nagy, Denis L. Norton, Judith Totman Parrish, P. Jonathan
Patchett, Joseph F. Schreiber, Jr. (Emeritus), Terah L. Smiley
(Emeritus), John S. Sumner (Emeritus), Spencer R. Titley, James
R. Wait (Emeritus), Terry C. Wallace

Associate Professors Mark D. Barton, Andrew W. Cohen, Owen K.
Davis, Randall M. Richardson, Joaquin Ruiz, Robert Singer
(Planetary Sciences)

Assistant Professors Lawrence M. Anovitz, Suzanne Baldwin, L.
Susan Beck, George E. Gehrels, Roy A. Johnson, Jay Quade

Lecturer Peter L. Kresan

Laboratory of Tree Ring Research
West Stadium Building, Room 109
(520) 621-6469

Professors Malcolm K. Hughes, Director, Bryant Bannister
(Emeritus), Jeffery S. Dean, Harold C. Fritts (Emeritus), William
J. Robinson (Emeritus), Charles W. Stockton, Marvin A. Stokes
(Emeritus)

Associate Professor Katie Hirschboeck, Steven W. Leavitt

Assistant Professors Lisa J. Graumlich, Thomas W. Swetnam

Geosciences, or those sciences dealing with the study of the
Earth, incorporate the various fields of study that are
applicable to an understanding of the formation and development
of the chemical, physical, and biological aspects of the Earth.
Academic and research pursuits in the geosciences lead toward a
professional career in solving or helping to solve the current
and projected issues dealing with land use, urban development,
the search for energy sources, water, industrial and commercial
minerals, and questions concerning earth processes involved in
modern geologic studies.

The department offers the following degree programs: Bachelor of
Science in Geosciences with concentrations in geology or
geophysics; and a Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy with
a major in geosciences. For graduate admissions and degree
requirements, consult the Graduate Catalog. The degree of
Bachelor of Science in Education with a teaching major in earth
sciences is available through the College of Education.

The B.S. in Geosciences (geology concentration): In addition to
the requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the
following courses are required: GEOS 101, 102, 103, 104, 209,
225, 302, 315, 321, 322, any four 400-level GEOS courses, and a
field program (GEOS 412 and 413, or equivalent), MATH 124 or
125a, 125b, and one additional course from MATH 215, 223, STAT
263 (or STAT 160); CHEM 103a-103b, 104a-104b; PHYS 110, 116, 121;
C SC 115 (or other approved computer course); plus approved
electives from geosciences and supporting fields to total 131
units.

The B.S. in Geosciences (geophysics concentration): In addition
to the requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the
following courses are required: GEOS 101, 102, 103, 104, 209,
302, 321, 322, 412, 416, 420, and 419 or 424 or 432 or 434 or
469; MATH 124 or 125a, 125b, 223, 254, and 422a; CHEM 103a-103b,
104a-104b; PHYS 110, 116, 121 and 410 or ECE 381; a computer
science course approved by the advisor; plus approved electives
from geosciences and supporting fields to total 131 units.

Students in the B.S. in Education (earth science teaching major)
enroll in the College of Arts and Sciences as a pre-education
major for the freshman and sophomore years. Although students
meet with a pre-education advisor in the College of Education to
outline required course work, they will also be advised in the
Department of Geosciences. Students must apply for admission, and
subsequent transfer, to the College of Education for their junior
and senior years. The required courses include: ASTR 110a; ATMO
171; GEOS 101, 102, 103, 104, and 401, MATH 124, 125a. A minimum
of 12 additional elective units require two courses selected from
GEOS 225, 321, 322, 431, 450, 453 or 478; one course on societal
issues in earth science from GEOS 415, GEOS 473, ATMO 336 or ECOL
206; and one course from ASTR 301, ATMO 300a or 300b, PTYS 403 or
ECOL 302. If either ASTR 301 or ATMO 300a or 300b is chosen, ASTR
110a or ATMO 171, respectively, will be waived from the core
requirement. The teaching minor may be a single minor or a split
minor from chemistry, physics, or biology; a single minor in
mathematics is also acceptable. Students must also satisfy the
College of Arts and Sciences general education requirements and
professional preparation courses in the College of Education.

A variety of geosciences minor options are available to students
in other departments: earth resources, environmental geoscience,
geoarchaeology, geochemistry, geophysics, mineralogy, and
paleontology. A split minor is also an option. An advisor in the
student's field of interest will assist in selecting courses. The
teaching minor requires 20 units of approved earth science
courses, including GEOS 101, 102, 103, 104; ASTR 110a-110b, and
ATMO 171.

The department participates in the honors program.

101. Introduction to Physical Geology (3) Earth's materials;
surface and internal geologic processes; development of plate
tectonics model. CR, 103.

102. Introduction to Historical Geology (3) Geologic history of
the earth with emphasis on North America; modern concepts on the
origin of life and evolution. P, 101, CR, 104.

103. Introduction to Physical Geology Laboratory (1) Practical
experience in rock and mineral identification, topographic and
geologic maps, and applied problems in geosciences. Field trips.
Fee. CR, 101.

104. Introduction to Historical Geology Laboratory (1) An
introduction to fossil identification, principles of
paleoecology, stratigraphy, and applied problems in geosciences.
Field trips. Fee. P, 101, 103, CR, 102.

106. Survey of the Solar System (4) I II (Identical with PTYS
106)

107a. Introduction to Global Change (4) I Examination of the ways
humanity alters the global environment; analysis of linkages
between components of the earth system (i.e., atmosphere,
biosphere, and geosphere). 107a not prerequisite to 107b. For
non-majors only. (Identical with HWR 107a).

107b. Introduction to Global Change (4) I (Identical with HWR
107b).

110. Environmental Geology (3) I II Introduction to geologic
studies and their application to current environmental problems,
their causes and possible solutions. Focuses on surface geologic
processes and geohazards, natural resources, and global systems.
Field trips. Primarily for nonmajors. Kresan/Schreiber

209. Introduction to Mineralogy and Geochemistry (5) II An
integrated treatment of the condensed materials that constitute
the earth. Review of chemical principles, the origin and
distribution of the elements. Crystallography, physical
properties, and crystal chemistry of minerals. Systematic
treatment of the crystal chemistry and physical properties of
rock-forming silicate and non-silicate minerals. Equilibrium
relations among geological solids and fluids. Distribution of
elements in surfical, crustal, oceanic and mantle minerals, rocks
and fluids. Geochemical cycles. Identification of minerals in
hand specimen, chemical calculations. 3R, 6L. P, CHEM 103a, 104a.
Barton/Ruiz/Baldwin

225. Introduction to Paleontology (4) I GRD Basic principles and
concepts; morphology and classification of fossils; their
occurrence, distribution, geologic and evolutionary significance.
3R, 2L. Field trips. P, 102, 104. Flessa

280. History of Life (2) II Scenarios and explanations for major
events in the history of life from the origin of the Earth to the
evolution of humans. Lindsay

302. Principles of Stratigraphy and Sedimentation (4) I GRD Basic
principles and methods of stratigraphic analysis; sedimentation
and depositional environments, facies relations, evaluation of
unconformities, stratigraphic classification and nomenclature,
correlation, and dynamics of basin fill. 3R, 3L. Field trips. P,
209. Cohen Writing-Emphasis Course. P, satisfaction  of the
upper-division  writing-proficiency requirement (see "Writing-
Emphasis Courses" in the Academic Policies and Graduation
Requirements section of this catalog).

315. Introduction to Petrology and Optical Mineralogy (5)
Introduction to methods of optical mineralogy and petrography.
Classification, compositions, structure, distribution, and origin
of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Rocks in their
tectonic setting. Petrologic evolution of rocks through time.
Examination of rocks in hand specimen and thin section. 3R, 6L.
P, 209. Writing-emphasis course.*

321. Structural Geology (4) II GRD Description and analysis of
geologic structures of deformational origin; stereographic and
experimental work in lab.; structure mapping in the field. 3R,
4L. P, 101, 102. G. Gehrels

322. Introduction to Geophysics (3) I GRD Physical principles
applied to problems in earth science including seismology,
gravity, magnetics, heat flow, plate tectonics. P, PHYS 116 and
180b. Butler

330. Introduction to Remote Sensing (3) I (Identical with GEOG
330)

346H. Natural Resources and Society (3) I History of the impact
of minerals and metals on development of society and
civilization, uniqueness of resources, current situation and
problems. P, junior standing. Titley

396H. Honors Proseminar

397. Workshop
a. Teaching Geosciences (2-3) [Rpt./3] I II P, consult department
before enrolling.

400. Introduction to Geochemistry (3) I Nuclear systematics and
thermodynamics with applications to geologic processes. P, 101,
103; CHEM 103b, 104b. May be convened with 500. Ruiz

403. Introduction to the Solar System (3) I 1993-94 (Identical
with PTYS 403) May be convened with 503.

404. Petrographic Techniques (3) I Introduction to application of
modern petrographic techniques. Use of optical theory, optical
petrography, electron microprobe and image processing to examine
and describe minerals and other materials. 2R, 3L. May be
convened with 504. Anovitz

406. Conservation Biology (3) II 1994-95 (Identical with ECOL
406) May be convened with 506.

407. Photogeology (3) II (Identical with G EN 407) May be
convened with 507.

408. Mammalian Phylogeny and Evolution (3) II 1994-95 A study of
the mammalian fossil record, with emphasis on taxonomy and
morphological evolution of selected mammal orders. 2R, 3L. Field
trips. May be convened with 508. Lindsay

409a. Petrology (3) II Earth composition; spatial and temporal
distribution of rock types; Igneous petrology. Application of
physicochemical and isotopic principles to magmatic processes. P,
315, 405, CHEM 480a. May be convened with 509a. Ruiz

410. Earth Science Teaching Methods and Materials (2) I
Instructional methods in laboratory and classroom, resources
development, curriculum planning and assessment. Field trips. P,
22 units in earth sciences.

411. Introduction to Planetary Geology (4) I 1994-95 (Identical
with PTYS 411)

412. Geology Field Camp I (3) S Field methods in geology;
preparation of geologic reports. Fee. P, 302, 315, 321.

413. Geology Field Camp II (3) S Field studies in geology, with
emphasis on geologic mapping. Fee. P, 412.

415. Geologic Hazards (2) I Physical aspects of floods,
landslides, subsidence, earthquakes, volcanoes, and coastal
storms. Role of geology in natural hazard management. P, 101,
103. Baker

416. Field Studies in Geophysics (3) I II S (Identical with G EN
416) May be convened with 516.

417. Sedimentary Basin Analysis (3) II Stratigraphic
sedimentological, paleogeographic, and paleotectonic evolution of
sedimentary basins with attention to facies relations,
depositional systems, and structural and plate tectonic
framework. P, 302. May be convened with 517. Parrish

418. Advanced Mineralogy (3) I 1994-95 Structure and crystal
chemistry of minerals, microstructural development, kinetics and
mechanisms of mineral reactions and transformations, with
application to determining geologic history of rocks. P, 209 or
consult department before enrolling. May be convened with 518.
Snow

419. Global Tectonic Processes (3) II Plate tectonics; thermal
properties and processes in the Earth; mechanical behavior of
lithosphere and mantle; global gravity and geoid. P, MATH 254;
PHYS 121. (Identical with PTYS 419) May be convened with 519.
Richardson/Chase

421. Tectonometamorphism (3) II 1993-94 Introduction to the use
of thermodynamics and kinetics in constraining the P-T-t
variables controlling subsolidus processes. Application of these
results to interpretations of regional tectonics and the thermal
evolution of planetary bodies. P, consult with department before
enrolling. May be convened with 521. Anovitz

423. Regional Structural Geology (3) [Rpt./3] I Geologic mapping
in a variety of rock types and structural regimes, with emphasis
on the recognition and solution of regionally significant
structural problems. Field trips. P, 413. May be convened with
523. G. Gehrels

424. Paleomagnetism: Principles and Applications (3) II Physical
basis for remanent magnetism in rocks, techniques of sample
collection, measurements, and statistical treatment; review of
polarity time scale, apparent polar wander, plate tectonics. P,
PHYS or 116. May be convened with 524. Butler

425. Regional Tectonics (3) I Discussion of the geology,
geophysics, petrology, and geochemistry of different types of
orogenic systems and their tectonic evolution. Methods of
tectonic regionalization and integration based on lithotectonic
assemblages and terranes, and  regional structural geology. Plate
tectonic regimens and kinematics. May be convened with 525. Coney

426. Cordilleran Tectonics (3) II Geologic and tectonic evolution
of the North American Cordillera based on analysis of geologic,
paleomagnetic, and paleobiogeographic constraints and tectonic
models. May be convened with 526. Gehrels

429. Scanning Electron Microscopy (2) Introduction to the
principles and methods of Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy
Dispersive Spectrometry and Image Analysis for
geological/paleontological samples. Students will have the
opportunity to conduct original research in SEM/EDS/IA as a
portion of the laboratory. 2R, 3L. May be convened with 529.

431. Hydrogeology (3) I II (Identical with HWR 431) May be
convened with 531.

432. Introduction to Seismology (3) I Fundamentals of earthquake
seismology; wave propagation, interpreting seismograms, and
quantifying earthquake sources. P, MATH 254. May be convened with
532. Wallace

434. Exploration Geophysics: Seismic Methods (3) II Fundamental
theory and techniques of seismic reflection and refraction data
acquisition; introduction to data processing and interpretation.
P, MATH 254. May be convened with 534. Johnson

438. Biogeography (3) II (Identical with ECOL 438) May be
convened with 538.

440. Geodynamics (3) II [Rpt.] Large-scale tectonic problems
approached by combined geophysical and geologic analysis in
regional context. P, 20 units of geology, including 321, 3 units
geophysics, MATH 254; consult with department before enrolling.
May be convened with 540. Chase

446. Economic Mineral Deposits (3) II GRD Geology of metallic and
nonmetallic ore deposits. Economic considerations, processes of
formation, methods of study and exploration, and description of
geologic aspects and settings of representative worldwide
examples. Field trips. P, 209, 321. May be convened with 546.
Guilbert/Titley

447. Industrial Minerals and Rocks (3) I 1994-95 Geology, origin,
mode of occurrence, and methods of evaluation of nonmetallic
mineral deposits. 2R, 3L. P, 446. May be convened with 547.
Guilbert

448. Geophysical Exploration and Engineering (3) I (Identical
with G EN 448) May be convened with 548.

449. Mineral Exploration (3) I 1993-94 (Identical with G EN 449)
May be convened with 549.

450. Geomorphology (4) I Concepts of landform development, with
emphasis on fluvial processes and environmental applications. 3R,
3L. Field trips. P, 101, 103. May be convened with 550. Bull

451. Sedimentary Petrology (4) I Hand specimen, detrital grain,
and thin section study of terrigenous clastic rocks, including
mudrocks; carbonate rocks and associated evaporites; cherts,
iron-rich rocks, and phosphorites. 2R, 6L. Field trips. P, 302,
315. May be convened with 551. Schreiber

452. Petroleum Geology (3) I Origin, migration, chemistry, and
accumulation of petroleum; reservoir mechanics, types of traps;
recovery of petroleum; oil shales and tar sands. 2R, 3L. May be
convened with 552. Nagy

453. Glacial and Quaternary Geology (3) II Glacial processes,
landforms, and deposits. Physical aspects of Quaternary
paleoenvironmental change and effects on fluvial, eolian,
lacustrine, weathering, and mass movement processes. P, 102, 104.
May be convened with 553. Baker

457. Low Temperature Geochemistry (3) II Equilibrium and kinetic
chemical processes producing soils, natural waters, and chemical
sediments. P, 101, 103, 400/500 or CHEM 480a; CHEM 103b, 104b.
(Identical with HWR 457) May be convened with 557. Long

458. Geochronology (3) I Introduction to geochronologic methods
used in the geological sciences including K-Ar/39AR, Rb-Sr, Sm-
Nd, U-Th-Pb, and fission track techniques. Application of
isotropic dating techniques to the study of crustal dynamics. P,
PHYS 110, 116, MATH 124 or 125a, CHEM 103a, 103b, 104a, 104b or
consult department before enrolling. Open to majors only. May be
convened with 558.

459. Thermochronology (3) II Closure temperature theory and
methods used to determine temperature - time histories of igneous
and metamorphic rocks. Applications of thermochronology and P-T-t
paths of crustal terranes. P, 458/558, MATH 254 or permission of
instructor. May be convened with 559.

462. Introduction to Quaternary Ecology (3) I Survey of methods
and theories used in reconstructing vegetation and climate. Ocean
cores, palynology, dendroclimatology. Field trip. P, 101.
(Identical with ANTH 462) May be convened with 562. O. Davis

464. Introduction to Dendrochronology (4) Survey of
dendrochronological theory and methods. Applications to
archaeological, geological, and biological dating problems and
paleoenvironmental reconstruction. Emphasis on dating methods,
developing tree-ring chronologies, and evaluating tree-ring dates
from various contexts. 2R, 4L. Field trips. (Identical with ANTH
464 and WS M 464) May be convened with 564. Swetnam

469. Seismic Data Processing (3) I Fundamental theory and
practical applications of time-series analysis and digital
filtering. A problem-solving approach to seismic reflection data
processing. P or CR, 434, MATH 422a. May be convened with 569.
Johnson

470. Introduction to Paleoecology (3) II Paleontologic approaches
to the reconstruction of ancient environments, populations and
communities. Evolution of communities through geologic time. 2R,
3L. Field trips. P, 225, 302. May be convened with 570. Flessa

473. Geology and the Urban Environment (3) II Geologic processes
that result in loss of life and/or property damage; emphasis on
case studies of urban areas in the Southwest. Implications for
public policy. 2R, 3L. All-day field trips. (Identical with  PLNG
473) May be convened with 573. McCullough

475. Cenozoic Mammalian Faunas (3) II 1993-94 Study of mammal
faunas and deposits yielding those faunas, with emphasis on
sequential ordering of the faunas using biostratigraphic and
paleomagnetic methods. 2R, 3L. Field trips. May be convened with
575. Lindsay

478. Global Change (3) II Analysis of the entire Earth system
through an examination of how its component parts and their
interactions have changed in the past and may be expected to
change in the future. P, upper-division standing; introductory
course work in biological and physical sciences. (Identical with 
ECOL 478, GEOG 478, HWR 478 and RNR 478) May be convened with
578. Graumlich

481. Quaternary Palynology and Plant Macrofossils (2-4) II Theory
and techniques of identification and interpretation of pollen,
spores, seeds, leaves, and wood of plants from sediment lakes,
marshes, caves, and archeological sites. P, ECOL 472. (Identical
with ANTH 481) May be convened with 581.

482. Paleoclimatology (3) I 1994-95 Topics in paleoclimatology
including prediction of paleoclimatic patterns, proxy
paleoclimatic indicators, and paleoclimatic cycles. May be
convened with 582. Parrish

490. Remote Sensing for the Study of Planet Earth (3) II 1993-94
(Identical with REM 490) May be convened with 590.

496. Seminar. 
Macroevolution (2) [Rpt./6 units] I II (Identical with ECOL 496p,
which is the home). May be convened with 596p.

497. Workshop
c. Dendrochronology (2) 3L. (Identical with ANTH 497c and WS M
497c). May be convened with 597c.

500. Introduction to Geochemistry (3) I For a description of
course topics, see 400. Graduate-level requirements include an
independent research report. P, 101, 103; CHEM 103b, 104b. May be
convened with 400. Ruiz

503. Introduction to the Solar System (3) I 1993-94 (Identical
with PTYS 503) May be convened with 403.

504. Petrographic Techniques (3) I For a description of course
topics, see 404. Graduate-level requirements include a paper and
class presentation. May be convened with 404. Anovitz

505. Applied Multispectral Imagery (3) II (Identical with G EN
505)

506. Conservation Biology (3) II 1994-95 (Identical with ECOL
506) May be convened with 406.

507. Photogeology (3) II (Identical with G EN 507) May be
convened with 407.

508. Mammalian Phylogeny and Evolution (3) II 1994-95 For a
description of course topics, see 408. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth research paper on a topic
selected by the student and the instructor. Field trips. May be
convened with 408. Lindsay

509a-509b. Petrology (3-3) II Earth composition; spatial and
temporal distribution of rock types; 509a: Igneous Petrology I
For a description of course topics, see 409a. Graduate-level
requirements include an independent research report. P, 315, 405,
CHEM 480a. May be convened with 409a. Ruiz. 509b: Metamorphic
Petrology II 1993-94 Application of physicochemical and isotopic
principles to metamorphic processes. P, 315, 405, CHEM 480a. 509a
is not prerequisite to 509b. Ganguly

510. Principles of Cosmochemistry (3) I 1994-95 (Identical with
PTYS 510)

514. Late Quaternary Geology (3) I Paleoenvironment and
geochronology of Late Quaternary alluvium as read from the
stratigraphic records and geomorphology at key localities in
North America. The interaction of fluvial and aeolian processes
in the eastern Sahara will be evaluated using enhanced LANDSAT
and Shuttle Imaging Radar. Domestic field trips. Enrollment
limited to 10 students. P, 102, 104. (Identical with ANTH 514)
Haynes

516. Field Studies in Geophysics (3) I II S (Identical with G EN
516) May be convened with 416.

517. Sedimentary Basin Analysis (3) II For a description of
course topics, see 417. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional research project. P, 302. May be convened with 417.
Parrish

518. Advanced Mineralogy (3) I 1994-95 For a description of
course topics, see 418. Graduate-level requirements include an
original research proposal. P, 209 or consult department before
enrolling. May be convened with 418. Snow

519. Global Tectonic Processes (3) II For a description of course
topics, see 419. Graduate-level requirements include a term paper
in publication format on some aspect of a major course topic. P,
MATH 254; PHYS 121. (Identical with PTYS 519) May be convened
with 419. Richardson/Chase

520. Meteorites (3) II 1994-95 (Identical with PTYS 520)

521. Tectonometamorphism (3) II 1993-94 For a description of
course topics, see 421. Graduate-level requirements include a
project. P, consult with department before enrolling. May be
convened with 421. Anovitz

522. Well Logging Interpretation (3) II (Identical with G EN 522)

523. Regional Structural Geology (3) [Rpt./3] I For a description
of course topics, see 423. Graduate-level requirements include
additional reading assignments on structural processes and
regional geology. Field trips. P, 413. May be convened with 423.
G. Gehrels

524. Paleomagnetism: Principles and Applications (3) II For a
description of course topics, see 424. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth research paper on a topic
selected by the student and instructor. P, PHYS 103b or 116. May
be convened with 424. Butler

525. Regional Tectonics (3) I For a description of course topics,
see 425. Graduate-level requirements include a research paper on
topical or regional tectonics. May be convened with 425. Coney

526. Cordilleran Tectonics (3) II For a description of course
topics, see 426. Graduate-level requirements include final report
concerning some aspect of the tectonic evolution of western North
America. May be convened with 426. Gehrels

527. Orogenic Systems (3) II An analysis of the geology,
geophysics, and geochemistry, and the tectonic evolution of
selected world mountain systems ranging from currently active
belts in both oceanic and continental settings back through
Phanerozoic, Proterozoic, and into Archean time. Coney

528. Geologic Characteristics of Ore Occurrence (3) I 1994-95
Geological, geochemical and geophysical signatures of ore
occurrence at the scales of tectonic settings, provinces,
districts, and mines. Field trips. P, CR, 446/546. Titley

529. Scanning Electron Microscopy (2) For a description of course
topics, see 429. Graduate-level requirements include a
sophisticated research project. 2R, 3L. May be convened with 429.

530. Chemical Evolution of the Earth (3) I Chemical
differentiation and evolution of earth's mantle and crust
according to major-element, trace-element and isotopic
characteristics of neodymium, hafnium, strontium, lead and other
isotopes. (Identical with PTYS 530) Patchett

531. Hydrogeology (3) I II (Identical with HWR 531) May be
convened with 431. A. Davis

532. Introduction to Seismology (3) I For a description of course
topics, see 432. Graduate-level requirements include a term
paper. P, MATH 254. May be convened with 432. Wallace

534. Exploration Geophysics: Seismic Methods (3) II For a
description of course topics, see 434. Graduate-level
requirements include a special research project. P, MATH 254. May
be convened with 434. Johnson

535. Advanced Subsurface Hydrology (3) II (Identical with HWR
535)

536. Ground Water Resource Evaluation (3) II (Identical with HWR
536)

538. Biogeography (3) II (Identical with ECOL 538) May be
convened with 438.

539. Analytical Methods in Geophysics (3) II 1994-95 Transform
theory, spectral analysis, asymptotic series, special functions,
probability. Applications to geophysical problems. P, Math 422b.
Wallace

540. Geodynamics (3) [Rpt.] II For a description of course
topics, see 440. Graduate-level requirements include a
quantitative modelling project in some aspect of tectonics and a
publication-format paper. P, 20 units of geology, including 321,
3 units geophysics, MATH 254; consult with department before
enrolling. May be convened with 440. Chase

541. Soil Genesis (3) II (Identical with S W 541)

542. Ore Deposit Petrology (3) II 1994-95 Orthomagmatic, porphyry
base metal, skarn, and leached capping lithologic-mineralogic
studies by petrographic microscope, electron probe, and advanced
techniques. 1R, 6L. P, 425/525 or CR, 646a. Guilbert

543. Mathematical Theory of Magma-Hydrothermal Systems (3) I
Dynamics and chronology of natural systems are reconstructed
using mathematical systems and computer models to represent the
redistribution of thermal and mechanical energy around magma
chambers. Norton

545. Geochemical Processes in Magma-Hydrothermal Systems (3) II
Migration of chemical components in natural fluid-rock systems
are analyzed using the geochemical theory that represents
irreversible, equilibrium and advection mass transfer. Norton

546. Economic Mineral Deposits (3) II GRD For a description of
course topics, see 446. Graduate-level requirements include an
independent study project. P, 209, 321. May be convened with 446.
Guilbert/Titley

547. Industrial Minerals and Rocks (3) I 1994-95 For a
description of course topics, see 447. Graduate-level
requirements include a term paper. P, 446. May be convened with
447. Guilbert

548. Geophysical Exploration and Engineering (3) I (Identical
with G EN 548) May be convened with 448.

549. Mineral Exploration (3) I 1993-94 (Identical with G EN 549)
May be convened with 449.

550. Geomorphology (4) I For a description of course topics, see
450. Graduate-level requirements include panel leaderships on
environmental discussion sessions, and additional lab exercise
questions. 3R, 3L. P, 101, 103. (Identical with AR L 550) May be
convened with 450. Bull

551. Sedimentary Petrology (4) I For a description of course
topics, see 451. Graduate-level requirements include a research
paper in publication format on a topic selected by the student
and instructor. 2R, 6L. Field trips. P, 302, 315. May be convened
with 451. Schreiber

552. Petroleum Geology (3) I For a description of course topics,
see 452. Graduate-level requirements include a term paper
regarding some aspect of a major course topic. 2R, 3L. May be
convened with 452. Nagy

553. Glacial and Quaternary Geology (3) II For a description of
course topics, see 453. Graduate-level requirements include an
independent research project or a term paper in publication
format. P, 102, 104. May be convened with 453. Baker

554. Evolution of Planetary Surfaces (3) II 1994-95 (Identical
with PTYS 554)

555. Remote Sensing of Planetary Surfaces (3) II 1993-94
(Identical with PTYS 555)

557. Low Temperature Geochemistry (3) II For a description of
course topics, see 457. Graduate-level requirements include an
independent research project or term paper in publication format.
P, 101, 103, 400/500 or CHEM 480a; CHEM 103b, 104b. (Identical
with HWR 557) May be convened with 457. Long

558. Geochronology (3) I For a description of course topics, see
458. Graduate students will be required to present projects at
the end of the semester. May be convened with 458.

559. Thermochronology (3) II For description of course topics,
see 459. Graduate students will be required to present projects
at the end of the semester. May be convened with 459.

560. Electrical Exploration Methods (3) I (Identical with G EN
560)

561. Paleoindian Origins (3) I (Identical with ANTH 561)

562. Introduction to Quaternary Ecology (3) I For a description
of course topics, see 462. Graduate-level requirements include a
term paper in publication format. Field trip. P, 101. May be
convened with 462. O. Davis

563. Isotope Hydrology (3) I Theory and application of light
stable and cosmogenic isotopes to hydrological and
paleoenvironmental problems. Radiometric dating of ground water.
(Identical with HWR 563) Long

564. Introduction to Dendrochronology (4) For a description of
course topics, see 464. Graduate-level requirements include a
research paper reviewing critically some aspect of
dendrochronology. 2R, 4L. Field trips. (Identical with ANTH 564
and WS M 564) May be convened with 464. Swetnam

567. Inverse Problems in Geophysics (3) I Linear and nonlinear
inverse theory, including least squares, generalized and maximum
likelihood methods. P, MATH 422b. (Identical with ATMO 567 and
PTYS 567) Richardson

568. Advanced Seismology (3) II 1993-94 Computational
techniquesin seismology. The application of  synthetic
seismograms to model source processes and complex structure. P,
432/532; MATH 422b. Wallace

569. Seismic Data Processing (3) I For a description of course
topics, see 469. Graduate-level requirements include a special
research project. P or CR, 434, MATH 422a. May be convened with
469. Johnson

570. Introduction to Paleoecology (3) II For a description of
course topics, see 470. Graduate-level requirements include a
research project and an abstract to be submitted for publication.
2R, 3L. Field trips. P, 225, 302. May be convened with 570.
Flessa

571. Terrestrial Planets (3) I 1993-94 (Identical with PTYS 571)

573. Geology and the Urban Environment (3) II For a description
of course topics, see 473. Graduate-level requirements include a
research paper on a topic related to geologic hazards but not
covered in lectures. 2R, 3L. All-day field trips. (Identical with
PLNG 573) May be convened with 473. McCullough

575. Cenozoic Mammalian Faunas (3) II 1993-94 For a description
of course topics, see 475. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research paper on a topic selected by the student and
the instructor. 2R, 3L. Field trips. May be convened with 475.
Lindsay

578. Global Change (3) II For a description of course topics, see
478. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research
paper on a topic selected by the student and instructor. P,
graduate standing; introductory course work in biological and
physical sciences. (Identical with  ECOL 578, GEOG 578, HWR 578
and RNR 578) May be convened with 478. Graumlich

580. Advanced Stratigraphy (3) [Rpt.2] II Topical analysis of
problems in stratigraphic analysis and depositional systems.
Field trips. P, 302. Cohen

581. Quaternary Palynology and Plant Macrofossils (2-4) II For a
description of course topics, see 481. (Identical with ANTH 581)
May be convened with 481.

582. Paleoclimatology (3) I 1994-95 For a description of course
topics, see 482. Graduate-level requirements include an
additional research project. May be convened with 482. Parrish

583. Thermodynamics in Geosciences (3) I Principles of classical
and elementary statistical thermodynamics. Thermo-chemical and -
physical properties; equations of states for solids and gases;
solutions; phase equilibrium; nonideal multicomponent systems
with emphasis on geological and planetary problems. P, MATH 125a-
125b, or 124, MATH 119 and/or consult with department before
enrolling. (Identical with PTYS 583) Ganguly

590. Remote Sensing for the Study of Planet Earth (3) II 1993-94
(Identical with REM 590) May be convened with 490.

595. Colloquium
b. Global Climate Change (2) [Rpt./1] I (Identical with ATMO
595b, which is home)
c. General Circulation Observation and Modeling (3) II (Identical
with ATMO 595c, which is home)
e. Dendrochronology: Physical Applications (3) [Rpt./2] I II Use
of tree-ring data to study past climatic, hydrologic and
geomorphic variation. (Identical with WS M 595e)
f. Dendrochronology: Biological Applications (3) [Rpt./2] I II
Discussion of wood features that are interpretable in terms of
environmental processes; application of tree-ring data to
ecological problems; biological basis of wood formation.
(Identical with WS M 595f)
g. Dendrochronology: Chronometric Applications (3) [Rpt./2] I II
Application of tree-ring dating to archeological and
environmental problems. (Identical with WS M 595g)

596. Seminar
a. Petrography-Petrology (1-4) [Rpt./6 units] I II
b. Structural Geology (1-4) [Rpt./6 units] I II
c. Mineral Deposits (1-4) [Rpt./6 units] I II
d. Petroleum Geology (1-4) [Rpt./6 units] I II
e. Tectonics (1-4) [Rpt./6 units] I II
f. Mineralogy-Crystallography (1-4) [Rpt./6 units] I II
g. Vertebrate Paleontology (1-4) [Rpt./6 units] I II
h. Paleontology (1-4) [Rpt./6 units] I II
i. Paleoecology-Paleoenvironments (1-4) [Rpt./6 units] I II
j. Geomorphology (1-4) [Rpt./6 units] I II
k. Geophysics (1-4) [Rpt./6 units] I II
l. Geomathematics (1-4) [Rpt./6 units] I II
m. Sedimentology (1-4) [Rpt./6 units] I II
n. Stratigraphy (1-4) [Rpt./6 units] I II
o. Regional Tectonics (1-4) [Rpt./6 units] I II
.  Macroevolution (2) [Rpt./6 units] I II (Identical with ECOL
596p, which is the home). May be convened with 496p.
q. General Geochronology (1-4) [Rpt./6 units] I II
r. Quaternary Geochronology (1-4) [Rpt./6 units] I II (Identical
with ANTH 596r)
s. Sedimentary Petrography (1-4) [Rpt./6 units] I II
t. Organic Geochemistry (1-4) [Rpt./6 units] I II
u. Inorganic Geochemistry (1-4) [Rpt./6 units] I II
v. Dendrochronology (1- 4) [Rpt./6 units] I II
w. Palynology (1-4) [Rpt./6 units] I II
x. Paleobotany (1-4) [Rpt./6 units] I II
y. Role of Water in Geologic Processes (1-4) [Rpt./6 units] I II
z. Topics in Geophysics (1-4) [Rpt./6 units] I II

597. Workshop
c. Dendochronology (2) 3L. May be convened with 497c. (Identical
with ANTH 597c and WS M 597c).

644a-644b. Geochemistry of Mineral Deposits and Related Rocks (4-
4) Principles and methods of physical chemistry as applied to ore
deposits. 644a: II 1993-94 Principles. Equilibrium thermodynamics
and phase equilibria, isotope geochemistry, chemical kinetics,
elementary mass and heat transfer. Includes problem solving and
applications to igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary ore
deposits. 644b: II 1994-95 Applications. Theoretical and
analytical techniques for estimation of intensive,
characterization of mass and heat transfer, and elementary
genetic modeling, includes lab and class problems focused on a
particular class of deposits. 3R, 3L. P, CHEM 480a. Barton

646a-646b. Advanced Ore Deposit Geology (4-4) Geology,
characteristics and origins of ore deposits in igneous,
sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Labs. include field trips,
analytical techniques, problem solving. 2R, 6L. P, 446/546, CHEM
480a or CR. Titley/Guilbert

650. Field Studies in Geomorphology (3) I 1993-94 Application of
quantitative methods to field problems. 2R, 3L. Field trips. P,
450. Bull

651. Climatic Geomorphology (3) I 1994-95 Effects of climatic
changes on  geomorphic processes, landforms, and soils;
paleoclimatic and earthquake-hazards interpretations. 2R, 3L.
Field trips. Bull

652. Tectonic Geomorphology (3) I 1994-95 Effects of tectonic
movements on geomorphic processes and landforms; earthquake-
hazards interpretations. Field trips. P, 450. Bull

 


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