The University of Arizona  1993-95 General Catalog

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Mining and Geological Engineering (G EN/MNEC/MN E)
Mines Building, Room 229
(520) 621-6063

Professors Jay C. Dotson (Emeritus), DeVerle P. Harris, Y.C. Kim,
Richard Newcomb, William C. Peters (Emeritus), Michael Rieber

Associate Professors Ben K. Sternberg, Head, Charles E. Glass,
Satya Harpalani, Pinnaduwa Kulatilake

Assistant Professors John Kemeny, Douglas LaBrecque, Paul J. A.
Lever, Mary Poulton

Geological Engineering (G EN)

Geological engineering involves the application of engineering
principles to the design and specification of earth structures
and the exploration and development of natural resources.

The department offers the Bachelor of Science in Geological
Engineering, and Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy
degrees with a major in geological and geophysical engineering. 
Undergraduate degree requirements are listed in the College of
Engineering and Mines section of this catalog.

120. Mineral Resources, Geotechnology and the Environment (3) I
II (Identical with MN E 120)

330. Introduction to Remote Sensing (3) I (Identical with GEOG
330)

402. Probability and Statistical Concepts in Geologic Media (4) I
Univariate probabilistic and statistical methods: data reduction,
basic probability concepts, discrete and continuous probability
distributions, sampling distributions, confidence intervals,
hypothesis testing, goodness-of-fit tests; applications in
geologic media. Introduction to several statistical packages. 3R,
3L. 3ES, 1ED. P, MATH 223. (Identical with MN E 402) May be
convened with 502. Kulatilake

407. Photogeology (3) I Use of aerial photographs in geologic
mapping. 1R, 6L. 1.5ES, 1.5ED. P, GEOS 321. (Identical with GEOS
407) May be convened with 507. Glass

415. Rock Excavation (3) II (Identical with MN E 415) May be
convened with 515.

416. Field Studies in Geophysics (3) II S Seismic, magnetic,
electrical, and gravity exploration techniques. Field trips.
Special fee may be required. 3ED. P, 448 or 548. (Identical with
GEOS 416) May be convened with 516. Sternberg

424. Fundamentals of Geotechnics (3) II Properties of natural
geologic deposits; principles of hemispherical projections and
rock joint surveys; engineering solutions to problems of soil and
rock slope stability, foundation stability and earth retaining
structures. 2R, 3L. 2ES, 1ED. P, C E 340. May be convened with
524. Kulatilake

425. Geotechnical Investigations (3) II Investigation and
analysis of geologic factors in the  design and construction of
engineering projects. 1R, 6L. 3ED. May be convened with 525.
Glass

426. Health and Safety in Mining (1) I (Identical with MN E 426)
May be convened with 526.

427. Geomechanics (3-4) I (Identical with MN E 427) May be
convened with 527.

445. Fundamentals of Geostatistics (3) [Rpt./6 units] II
(Identical with MN E 445) May be convened with 545.

448. Geophysical Exploration and Engineering (3) I Principles of
gravity, magnetic, seismic and electrical exploration;
acquisition and interpretation of data to define geologic
structure and evaluate resources. 3R. 2ES, 1ED. P, PHYS 110, 116,
MATH 223. (Identical with GEOS 448) May be convened with 548.
Sternberg/Johnson

449. Mineral Exploration (3) I 1993-94 Analysis of guides and
techniques leading to location and delineation of mineral
deposits. 1ES, 2ED. P, GEOS 209. (Identical with GEOS 449 and MN
E 449) May be convened with 549. Poulton

470. Computer Methods in Geological Engineering (3) II Use of
computers to solve problems in geological engineering, including
data bases, computer contouring, map filtering and enhancement,
and multivariate analysis of geologic data. 3ED. P, introductory
courses in computer programming, math, and earth science. May be
convened with 570. Poulton/Sternberg

490. Remote Sensing for the Study of Planet Earth (3) II 1993-94
(Identical with REM 490) May be convened with 590.

502. Probability and Statistical Concepts in Geologic Media (4) I
For a description of course topics, see 402. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth term paper on an application. P,
MATH 223. (Identical with MN E 502) May be convened with 402.
Kulatilake

505. Applied Multispectral Imagery (3) II Application of image
processing to mineral exploration, engineering geology,
groundwater location, and pollution monitoring. P, 407.
(Identical with GEOS 505) Glass

507. Photogeology (3) I For a description of course topics, see
407. Graduate-level requirements include completion of an
advanced project involving photo interpretation and field
mapping. P, GEOS 321. (Identical with GEOS 507) May be convened
with 407. Glass

515. Rock Excavation (3) II (Identical with MN E 515) May be
convened with 415.

516. Field Studies in Geophysics (3) II S For a description of
course topics, see 416. Graduate-level requirements include
additional project work requiring a more in-depth analysis. Field
trips. Special fee may be required. P, 448 or 548. (Identical
with GEOS 516) May be convened with 416. Sternberg

522. Well Logging Interpretation (3) II Basic well logging
theory. Fundamentals of quantitative formation evaluation.
Detailed investigation of aspects of well logging applicable to
student's research interests. P, consult department before
enrolling. (Identical with GEOS 522 and HWR 522) LaBracque

524. Fundamentals of Geotechnics (3) II For a description of
course topics, see 424. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research paper on an assigned topic. P, C E 340. May be
convened with 424. Kulatilake

525. Geotechnical Investigations (3) II For a description of
course topics, see 425. Graduate-level requirements include a
research project. May be convened with 425. Glass

526. Health and Safety in Mining (1) I (Identical with MN E 526)
May be convened with 426.

527. Geomechanics (3-4) I (Identical with MN E 527) May be
convened with 427.

529. Rock Slope Analyses and Design (3) I (Identical with MN E
629)

537. Developments in Rock Mechanics (2) I (Identical with MN E
537)

545. Fundamentals of Geostatistics (3) [Rpt./6 units] II
(Identical with MN E 545) May be convened with 445.

548. Geophysical Exploration and Engineering (3) I For a
description of course topics, see 448. Graduate-level
requirements include a special research project collecting and
interpreting geophysical field data. P, PHYS 110, 116, MATH 223.
(Identical with GEOS 548) May be convened with 448.
Sternberg/Johnson

549. Mineral Exploration (3) I For a description of course
topics, see 449. Graduate-level requirements include a research
report. P, GEOS 209. (Identical with GEOS 549 and MN E 549) May
be convened with 449. Poulton

550. Earthquake Engineering (3) I Applied course in earthquake
causes and effects, integrating the fields of seismology,
engineering, and seismic geology. P, MATH 254. Glass

557. Fundamentals of Geomechanics (4) II (Identical with MN E
527)

560. Electrical Exploration Methods (3) I Electrical properties
of minerals and rocks, resistivity and resistivity exploration,
induced polarization and complex resistivity, magneto-telluric
methods, and electromagnetic prospecting methods. P, 421, 448.
Consult department before enrolling. (Identical with GEOS 560)
Sternberg

570. Computer Methods in Geological Engineering (3) II For a
description of course topics, see 470. Graduate-level
requirements include an additional advanced research project. P,
introductory courses in computer programming, math, and earth
science. May be convened with 470. Poulton/Sternberg

580. The Mechanics of Fracture in Rock and Other Brittle
Materials (3) II (Identical with MN E 580)

587. Applied Neural Network Computing (3) II Theoretical
development and applications of artificial neural networks for
classification, parameter estimation, prediction, filtering, and
association. Emphasis is placed on applications in science and
engineering. P, knowledge of a programming language. Poulton

590. Remote Sensing for the Study of Planet Earth (3) II 1993-94
(Identical with REM 590) May be convened with 490.

603. Rock Mass Joint Geometry Modeling (3) [Rpt./1] II 1993-94
Sampling techniques; statistical homogeneity; delineation of
joint sets; corrections for sampling biases of joint parameters;
inference of statistical distributions for orientation, spacing,
intensity and size; joint systems modeling and validation. 2R,
3L. P, 402, SIE 270. Kulatilake

649. Probabilistic Methods in Geotechnical Engineering (3) II
(Identical with C E 649)

660a-660b. Estimation of Mineral Resources by Quantitative
Methods (3-3) (Identical with MNEC 660a-660b)

696. Seminar
a. Research (1-3) [Rpt.] I II (Identical with MN E 696a and MNEC
696a)

Mineral Economics (MNEC)

Mineral economics interfaces minerals engineering and earth
sciences with applied economics. It involves mineral investment
analysis, planning and forecasting, and statistical analysis of
exploration and mining ventures.

aster of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered
with a major in mineral economics. For admission and degree
requirements, please see the Graduate Catalog.

418. Mine Investment Analysis (3) II (Identical with MN E 418)
May be convened with 518. Harris

500. Economics of Mineral Resource Development and Production (4)
I Concepts and methods of mineral economics; analyses of selected
mineral and energy commodities, current economic and political
issues and investment strategies in selected mineral industries.
P, ECON 361. (Identical with MN E 500) Harris

518. Mine Investment Analysis (3) II (Identical with MN E 518)
May be convened with 418. Harris

550. Economics of the Non-Fuel Mineral Industries (3) II
Reserves, resources, and major deposits, production technologies,
pricing, market structure, and practices, industrial
organization, consumption trends, recycling, and foreign trade.
P, AREC 504. Newcomb/Rieber

584. Economics of Fossil, Fissile, and Alternative Energy Sources
(3) I Reserves and resources; economics of production,
utilization and conversion; externalities, market structure,
technical change, pricing and competitive behavior, interfuel
substitution. P, AREC 504. Rieber/Newcomb

587. Minerals and Economic Development: Concepts, Conflicts and
Case Studies (3) II Concepts of, measures of, and models for
economic development, foreign investment in mineral resources
development, problems and conflicts of investor and host
countries; case studies. P, AREC 504. Rieber

600. Readings in Mineral Economics (3) II Selected readings in
the economics of mineral resource exploration and exploitation,
environmental protection, national mineral policy, world mineral
development, and international trade. P, ECON 361. Rieber

650a-650b. Advanced Principles of Mineral Economics (3-3) Risk
analysis; optimum production, depletion and exhaustion;
productivity and technical change; imperfect competition in
mineral markets; resource distribution, trade and mineral policy.
P, ECON 501a or AREC 504. Rieber/Newcomb

651. Quantitative Models and Analysis in Mineral Economics (4) I
1993-94 Morphology and structure of economic models, estimation
procedures for multiple equation models, data problems,
violations of assumptions, and case studies of econometric models
in the analysis of mineral industries. P, ECON 518; 501a or AREC
504; MNEC 500, MNEC 550, or MNEC 584. Harris

660a-660b. Estimation of Mineral Resources by Quantitative
Methods (3-3) 1993-94 Estimation of mineral resource potential;
life cycle models; crustal abundance models; grade-tonnage
relationships, spatial and multivariate models, and subjective
probability. P, STAT 660, or ECON 518, or SIE 420. (Identical
with G EN 660a-660b) Harris

665. Forecasting for Mineral Industries (4) II Methods for short-
and long-term forecasting applied to mineral industries: trend
analysis, simple econometric models, exponential smoothing, and
input-output analysis; case studies. P, ECON 361; STAT 660 or
ECON 518. Harris

696. Seminar
a. Research (1-3) [Rpt.] I II (Identical with G EN 696a, which is
home)
b. Advanced Topics in Mineral Evaluation and Risk Analysis (1-3)
[Rpt./3 units] I II Harris
c. Mineral and Energy Policy Analysis (1-3) [Rpt./3 units] I II
Newcomb
d. Advanced Mineral Commodity Analysis (1-3) [Rpt./3 units] I II
Harris
e. Topics in Mineral and Energy Supply (1-3) [Rpt./3 units] I II
Rieber
f. Decision Analysis and Operations Research in Mineral
Exploration (1-3) [Rpt./3 units] I II Harris
g. Process Analysis and Costing (1-3) [Rpt./3 units] I II Rieber

Mining Engineering (MN E)

Mining engineering involves the planning, design, development and
operation of underground and surface mines and other subsurface
facilities.

The department offers the Bachelor of Science in Mining
Engineering, and Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy
degrees with a major in mining engineering.

Undergraduate degree requirements are listed in the College of
Engineering and Mines section of this catalog.

120. Mineral Resources, Geotechnology and the Environment (3) I
II The history and recent advances in locating and extracting
earth's mineral resources; the principles of developing and
managing earth's resources and hazards; environmental concerns
such as acid rain and hazardous waste. 2R, 3L. (Identical with
ENGR 120 and G EN 120) Kemeny/Poulton

220. Mining Methods (3) II Introduction to the techniques, unit
operations, and systems involved in underground and surface
mining of minerals and coal. Field trips. 2R, 3L. 2ES, 1ED. P, MN
E 120. Harpalani

401. Analysis of Mine Operations (3) I Use of operations research
principles and techniques to analyze various problems in mine
operations. 2ES, 1ED. May be convened with 501. Harpalani

402. Probability and Statistical Concepts in Geologic Media (4) I
(Identical with G EN 402) May be convened with 502.

406. Fundamentals of Mine Ventilation (3) II Determination of
quality and quantity of respirable air in mining operations.
Thermodynamics of mine ventilation and design of ventilation
systems. 2R, 3L. 1ES, 2ED. P, AME 331a. May be convened with 506.
Harpalani

410. Mine Surveying (1) II Mine surveying problems and practices;
closed traverse of underground mine; shaft plumbing, stope and
raise surveying. 1ES. P, 120, C E 251. Lever

411. Mineral Processing (3) I Physical and chemical unit
operations used to separate and recover the economic minerals and
metals from their ores. The modern scientific and engineering
background for the operations are presented as well as economic
aspects. Includes field trips to major mining operations in
Tucson area. 2ES, 1ED. (Identical with MSE 411) May be convened
with 511.

415. Rock Excavation (3) II Methods of excavation of rock in
surface and underground mines and construction, ranging from the
empiricism of conventional blasting practice to the application
of the fundamental mechanics of rock fracture. 2R, 3L. 2ES, 1ED.
Field trips. P, C E 217. (Identical with G EN 415) May be
convened with 515. Writing-Emphasis Course. P, satisfaction of
the upper-division  writing-proficiency requirement (see
"Writing-Emphasis Courses" in the Academic Policies and
Graduation Requirements section of this catalog). Lever

418. Mine Investment Analysis (3) II Economic factors, including
taxation, mineral depletion allowance, and finance in the mining
industry; includes fundamentals of engineering economics, capital
budgeting, and risk analysis. 1ES, 2ED. P, 430. (Identical with
MNEC 418) May be convened with 518. Harris

426. Health and Safety in Mining (1) I Fundamental concepts in
the recognition, evaluation and control of health and safety
hazards encountered in mining operations; includes a review of
engineering management responsibilities to control accidents, a
review of federal regulations and standards affecting the
industrial workplace, and instruction regarding the interaction
of industrial hygiene, safety, fire protection and workers'
compensation to control losses resulting from industrial
accidents. 1ES. (Identical with G EN 426) May be convened with
526. Lever

427. Geomechanics (3-4) I Mechanical behavior of rock and rock
masses; response to load changes: deformations, failure,
discontinuity slip; in situ stress state; rock testing;
geomechanical classifications; engineering applications: slopes,
pillars, tunnels, dam foundations; reinforcement design. 3R, 3L.
2ES, 2ED. P, C E 217, GEOS 321. (Identical with G EN 427) May be
convened with 527. Kemeny

430. Mine Examination and Valuation (3) I Principles and
procedures in mineral property valuation, geostatistical ore
reserve estimation, engineering, economy, investment analysis;
use of a microcomputer. 1ES, 2ED. P, 402, 220. May be convened
with 530. Kim

433. Elements of Coal Mining (3) Coal geology, properties and
use. Surface and underground methods and equipment: strip mining;
continuous, conventional, longwall mining; ground control;
ventilation; haulage; electrical power; drainage. Preparation and
reclamation. 3ES. P, 220, 406, ECE 207. May be convened with 533.

435. Mine Design (3) II Computer-aided design of a modern mine;
feasibility study, pit limit design, mining sequence development
and short-term mine planning. 2R, 3L. 3ED. P or CR, 430, 440. May
be convened with 535. Kim

436. Subsurface Environmental Engineering (3) I Analysis of
sources of heat, humidity, gases and dust in mines and other
subsurface facilities. Design of engineering systems to control
these pollutants.  2ES, 1ED. P, 406 or consult with department
before enrolling. May be convened with 536. Harpalani

440. Materials Handling (3) I Surface and underground material
handling methods. Performance analysis and selection of the
following haulage equipment: trucks, shovels, draglines, shuttle
cars, locomotives, hoists, conveyors, hydraulic and pneumatic
transport systems. Computer applications. 2R, 3L. 1ES, 2ED. Field
trips. P, C E 214. May be convened with 540. Lever

445. Fundamentals of Geostatistics (3) [Rpt./6 units] II Theory
and application of geostatistics in solving various
estimation/prediction problems frequently encountered in reserve
estimation, in geotechnical and/or hydrogeologic parameter
estimation, and in environmental regulations. P, integral and
differential calculus. (Identical with G EN 445) May be convened
with 545.

447. Underground Construction Geomechanics (2-3) II Geomechanical
aspects of underground excavation in rock. Empirical and
mechanistic stability evaluation and design. 2R, 3L. 2ED. All-day
field trip. P, 427. May be convened with 547.

449. Mineral Exploration (3) (Identical with G EN 449) May be
convened with 549.

490. Remote Sensing for the Study of Planet Earth (3) II 1993-94
(Identical with REM 490) May be convened with 590.

497. Workshop
a. Unit Operations (1-3) I II S P, 220. May be convened with
597a. Lever

500. Economics of Mineral Resource Development and Production (4)
I (Identical with MNEC 500)

501. Analysis of Mine Operations (3) I For a description of
course topics, see 401. Graduate-level requirements include a
project using MIS software. May be convened with 401. Harpalani

502. Probability and Statistical Concepts in Geologic Media (4) I
(Identical with G EN 502) May be convened with 402.

503. Analysis of Mining Decisions (3) I Use of geostatistics,
system simulation languages and computers to analyze various
mining decisions related to reserve estimation and mine planning.
P, 401, 402, 430. Kim

506. Fundamentals of Mine Ventilation (3) II For a description of
course topics, see 406. Graduate-level requirements include a
simulation project on design of an airflow system for an
underground mine. May be convened with 406. Harpalani

511. Mineral Processing (3) I For a description of course topics,
see 411. Graduate-level requirements include an advanced research
project. (Identical with MSE 511) May be convened with 411.

515. Rock Excavation (3) II For a description of course topics,
see 415. Graduate-level requirements include a research project.
Field trips. P, C E 217. (Identical with G EN 515) May be
convened with 415.

518. Mine Investment Analysis (3) II For a description of course
topics, see 418. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth
research paper on a single aspect of mineral investment to be
approved by the instructor. P, 430. (Identical with MNEC 518) May
be convened with 418. Harris

526. Health and Safety in Mining (1-1) I For a description of
course topics, see 426. Graduate-level requirements include a
term paper. (Identical with G EN 526) May be convened with 426.

527. Geomechanics (3-4) I For a description of course topics, see
427. Graduate-level requirements include either a research
project or a research paper at the discretion of the instructor.
P, C E 217, GEOS 321. (Identical with G EN 527) May be convened
with 427. Kemeny

529. Rock Slope Analyses and Design (3) I Geologic and
engineering considerations in design of optimum rock slope
angles; constitutive models for intact rock and joints;
theoretical stability analysis, monitoring and control of
existing slopes. Field trip. P, 427. (Identical with GEN 629)
Kulatilake

530. Mine Examination and Valuation (3) I For a description of
course topics, see 430. Graduate-level requirements include
either a research project or a research paper at the discretion
of the instructor. P, 220, 402. May be convened with 430. Kim

533. Elements of Coal Mining (3) For a description of course
topics, see 433. Graduate-level requirements include a research
project. May be convened with 433.

535. Mine Design (3) II For a description of course topics, see
435. Graduate-level requirements include either a research
project or a research paper at the discretion of the instructor.
P or CR, 430, 440. May be convened with 435. Kim

536. Subsurface Environmental Engineering (3) I For a description
of course topics, see 436. Graduate-level requirements include a
simulation project on the problem of heat and humidity in a
subsurface facility. P, 406 or consult department before
enrolling. May be convened with 436. Harpalani

537. Developments in Rock Mechanics (2) I Discussion of new
developments in rock mechanics and of areas of interest for
future research. Field trips. P, 427 or 527. (Identical with G EN
537)

540. Materials Handling (3) I For a description of course topics,
see 440. Graduate-level requirements include a research project.
Field trips. P, C E 214. May be convened with 440.

545. Fundamentals of Geostatistics (3) [Rpt./6 units] II For a
description of course topics, see 445. Graduate-level
requirements include an additional class project. P, integral and
differential calculus. (Identical with G EN 545) May be convened
with 445.

547. Underground Construction Geomechanics (2-3) II For a
description of course topics, see 447. Graduate-level
requirements include an independent design/analysis project. All-
day field trip. P, 427 or 527. May be convened with 447.

549. Mineral Exploration (3) (Identical with G EN 549) May be
convened with 449.

557. Fundamentals of Geomechanics (4) II Mechanical behavior of
geological materials: stress and strain analysis; friction;
elasticity, strength and failure; discontinuity slip. Laboratory
testing. Applications to rock engineering problems. 3R, 3L. P,
427 or C E 340, GEOS 321. (Identical with G EN 557)

580. The Mechanics of Fracture in Rock and Other Brittle
Materials (3) II Fracture mechanics theory applied to the
deformation and failure of rock; numerical techniques;
micromechanical damage models; flow through fractures; the
mechanics of faulting and earthquake rupture. P, advanced course
in engineering mechanics or geomechanics (G EN 427) (Identical
with G EN 580) Kemeny

590. Remote Sensing for the Study of Planet Earth (3) II 1993-94
(Identical with REM 590) May be convened with 490.

597. Workshop
a. Unit Operations (1-3) I II S P, 220. May be convened with
497a.

622. Advanced Kriging Techniques (3) II Theory and application of
advanced kriging techniques to mining and earth science related
problems; universals, lognormal, indicator, co and probability
kriging. P, 402, 430, 501 or MATH 579. Kim 

696. Seminar
a. Research (1-3) [Rpt.] I II (Identical with G EN 696a, which is
home)

 


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