The University of Arizona  1993-95 General Catalog

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Health-Related Professions
(HLTH/OSH/EXSS/MEDT)

Anne E. Atwater, Interim Director

The School of Health-Related Professions, an integral part of the
Arizona Health Sciences Center, offers the following degree
programs: the Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences with majors
in exercise sciences, health education, physical education,
medical technology, and occupational safety and health, and the
Master of Science and Master of Arts degrees with a major in
exercise and sport sciences.

Community and Environmental Health
1435 N. Fremont Ave., Room 111
(520) 882-5852

Associate Professors Richard L. Papenfuss, Head, Kam Nasser

Assistant Professors Clifton D. Crutchfield, Scott J. Leischow,
Mark D. Van Ert

Instructor Sheila H. Parker

The Division of Community and Environmental Health provides
instructional programs to prepare students for careers in school
health education, community health education, and industrial
hygiene and safety. Undergraduate studies lead to the Bachelor of
Science in Health Sciences with the following majors: health
education, occupational safety and health. Admission and degree
requirements for these majors are listed in the School of Health-
Related Professions section of this catalog (under Colleges and
General Divisions).

Students selecting a teaching major other than health education
may elect a teaching minor in health education in consultation
with a College of Education advisor. The teaching minor in health
education consists of 21 units, including HLTH 178, 278, 306,
330, 381, 430 or 432, and 434.

Students intending to minor in health education or to use health
education as a general studies concentration area are expected to
have a background in anatomy and physiology, nutrition, and
principles of communicable diseases. Required courses include
HLTH 178, 306, 330, 400, 430, 432, and 434.

Health Education (HLTH)

178. Personal Health and Wellness (3) I II Introduces and
analyzes basic personal and community health problems, with
emphasis on current scientific information essential to health
promotion and maintenance of individual health. Credit for this
course or 278, but not for both.

200. Introduction to Health Education (3) I II Determinants of
health behavior, the process of health education, and the
practice of health education. Open to majors/minors only. P, HLTH
178 or CR.

278. Health Science Promotion (3) II Basic concepts of health
science, optimal health, lifestyle factors and health risks
associated with the college-age population; emphasis on health
promotion and intervention techniques; practical experience with
individual and group health behavior change projects. Credit is
allowed for this course or 178, but not for both.

306. Drugs and Society (3) I II An overview of personal drug use
in contemporary society including an historical perspective, drug
metabolism, drug action and classification, legal issues, reasons
for abuse, and drug abuse prevention strategies.

330. Human Sexuality (3) I II Discussion of the basic aspects of
human sexuality, including male and female reproductive
physiology, congenital defects, venereal disease, myths and
fallacies, variations of sexual response. Credit is allowed for
330 or SOC 324, but not for both.

381. School Health Education (3) I II Emphasis on health science
information applicable to health education classes; for students
preparing to teach in the public schools.

393. Internship
a. Pre-Med (3) I II S Open to pre-med students only.

400. Contemporary Community Health Problems (3) II Analysis of
the concept of community health services, human ecology, and
conservation of human resources, with emphasis on modern miasmas
such as air, water, and noise pollution; sociological problems of
alcohol, alcoholism, and drug abuse.

430. Theory-based Approaches in Health Education/Health Promotion
(3) I Analysis of the epidemiological data to determine the
health problems of our people; behavioral relationships; and the
study and application of theory-based educational strategies
designed to prevent health problems. May be convened with 530.

432. Program Planning and Education in Health Education/Health
Promotion (3) II Principles for planning, implementing,
administering and evaluating health education programs utilizing
the "PRECEDE Model" as a framework. May be convened with 532.

433. International Health (3) I Interprets the major health
problems not only of the developed and emerging nations, but also
the situations in underdeveloped countries; includes assistance
programs by international health groups.

434. Sex Education (3) II Critical analysis of the current
philosophy, principles, programs, problems, trends and basic
issues in sex education. P, 330.

435. Safety Education and Accident Prevention (3) S Analysis of
accident prevention programs in schools, colleges, communities,
and industry, with emphasis on specific protective measures
pertaining to athletics, physical education, recreation, highway
safety, and vocational training.

436. Traffic Safety Education (3) S Principles of accident
prevention and traffic survival education, with emphasis on the
certification of secondary school teachers preparing to teach
driver education and training.

440. Survey of Health Education/Health Promotion Literature (3) I
Examination of health education/health promotion literature from
ancient societies to present, including an analysis of current
health literature from various professional, community,
voluntary, public and international health organizations.
Writing-Emphasis Course. P, satisfaction of the upper-division
writing-proficiency requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis Courses"
in the Academic Guidelines section of this catalog). May be
convened with 540.

475. Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (1) S Review of the nature and
ramifications of alcohol problems, as well as analysis of
physical, psychological and social implications.

493. Internship
a. Field Work in Health Education (3) I II Open to health
education majors only.

530. Theory-based Approaches in Health Education/Health Promotion
(3) I For description of course topics, see 430. Graduate
students will be required to write an in-depth research paper.
May be convened with 430.

532. Program Planning and Education in Health Education/Health
Promotion (3) II For description of course topics, see 432.
Graduate students will have the additional responsibility of
writing a mock grant proposal. May be convened with 432.

535. Multicultural Health Beliefs (3) II Designed to provide a
sensitivity by health promotion professionals to the varying
multicultural health beliefs and needs of our society. Special
emphasis on ethnic characteristics of minority populations in the
State of Arizona with recommendations for programming strategies.

540. Survey of Health Education/Health Promotion Literature (3) I
For description of course topics, see 440. Graduate students will
have the additional requirement of completing an in-depth
research paper. May be convened with 440.

Occupational Safety and Health (OSH)

402. Industrial Hygiene Instrumentation and Analysis (2-4) I
Introduction to field sampling instruments and strategies,
quality control, and statistical analysis, with emphasis on
instrument selection and calibration. 2R, 3L. P, 486, CHEM 322,
323. May be convened with 502. Writing-Emphasis Course. P,
satisfaction of the upper-division writing-proficiency
requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis Courses" in the Academic
Guidelines section of this catalog).

410. Physical Exposures (3) II Recognition, evaluation, and
control of physical exposures, including radiation, noise,
vibration, and heat stress. Student is required to recognize
potential exposures, use correct instrumentation to collect and
evaluate data, and develop controls. 2R, 3L. P, 486. (Identical
with TOX 410) May be convened with 510.

412. Hazardous Materials (2-4) I Recognition, evaluation, and
control of exposure to environmental and industrial air
contaminants. P, 486. May be convened with 512.

460. Introduction to Epidemiology (3) I II Introduction to the
purposes, principles, and methods of epidemiology.

486. Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene (3) I Introduction to the
principles of occupational safety and health, with emphasis on
industrial hygiene aspects including recognition, evaluation, and
control of environmental and industrial health hazards.
(Identical with C E 486 and TOX 486) May be convened with 586.

487. Advanced Industrial Hygiene and Safety (3) II An in-depth
coverage of the industrial hygiene and safety professions
emphasizing the principles of contaminant behavior and the design
of industrial hygiene/safety programs. P, 486. (Identical with C
E 487 and TOX 487) May be convened with 587.

488. Applied Industrial Safety (3) II Thorough study of technical
safety topics such as fire technology, systems safety, manual
materials handling; selected topics in construction and
manufacturing safety. P, 486.

495. Colloquium
a. Occupational Safety and Health (3) [Rpt./2] I II S P, 486.

502. Industrial Hygiene Instrumentation and Analysis (2-4) I For
a description of course topics, see 402. Graduate-level
requirements include in-depth laboratory reports. P, 586.
(Identical with TOX 502) May be convened with 402.

510. Physical Exposures (3) II For a description of course
topics, see 410. Graduate-level requirements include completion
of comprehensive laboratory reports, detailing exposure
potential, use of correct instrumentation, and control
recommendations. P, 486. (Identical with TOX 510) May be convened
with 410.

512. Hazardous Materials (2-4) I For a description of course
topics, see 412. Graduate-level requirements include a
comprehensive paper detailing hazards associated with a
particular chemical. P, 586. (Identical with TOX 512) May be
convened with 412.

586. Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene (3) I For a description
of course topics, see 486. Graduate-level requirements include a
comprehensive term paper addressing an occupational health topic.
(Identical with C E 586 and TOX 586) May be convened with 486.

587. Advanced Industrial Hygiene and Safety (3) II For a
description of course topics, see 487. Graduate-level
requirements include participation in an industrial hygiene
assessment of a plant and completion of a formal report
describing the results of the survey. P, 486. (Identical with C E
587 and TOX 587) May be convened with 487.

Exercise and Sport Sciences (EXSS)
Ina E. Gittings Building, Room 101
(520) 621-6989

Professors Anne E. Atwater, Acting Head, Roger M. Enoka, Timothy
G. Lohman, Donna Mae Miller (Emerita), Frederick B. Roby, Mary P.
Roby (Emerita), Charles M. Tipton, Jean M. Williams

Associate Professors Boyd B. Baker, William K. Coopwood
(Emeritus), Gary D. Delforge, Patricia C. Fairchild, Bruce A.
Larson, Richard A. Munroe (Emeritus), Kathryn R.E. Russell,
Darrell G. Simko

Assistant Professors Ralph F. Fregosi, Kim C. Graber, Erik J.
Henriksen, Kevin C. Kregel

Lecturers Thomas L. Akers, Michael E. Haddow, Monica Mize, Judy
A. Sorensen, Ronald A. Sutherland

The Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences is concerned with
advancing the body of knowledge in the exercise and sport
sciences and preparing professionals for careers in exercise
science, teaching, coaching, and research. Undergraduate majors
in exercise sciences and physical education for the Bachelor of
Science in Health Sciences are offered. Admission and degree
requirements for both majors are listed in the School of Health-
Related Professions section of this catalog (under Colleges and
General Divisions).

Students selecting a teaching major other than physical education
may elect a teaching minor in physical education in consultation
with a College of Education advisor. 

Interdisciplinary studies majors in the College of Arts and
Sciences may elect to take at least 24 approved units of course
work in exercise and sport sciences as Subject Area III. Students
should consult either the exercise sciences major advisor or the
physical education major advisor for Subject Area III approved
courses.

The athletic coaching minor (not available to physical education
majors): 285, 360, 373, 374, 377, 385, 394a; 4 units from 286 and
354, to include a minimum of 2 units in 354.

The exercise sciences minor: This minor requires at least 20
units of credit to be selected from course offerings in exercise
and sport sciences. Specific course requirements include the
following: 16 units consisting of EXSS 201, 202, 308, 420, 462,
and four or more units selected from among EXSS 421, 445, 460,
495a, 496b. For further details, consult with the exercise
sciences major advisor in the department. Students will be
expected to have completed the prerequisites required by the
courses in the minor.

The physical education teaching minor: CHEM 103a-103b, 104a-104b,
EXSS 201, 202, 261 or 377, 285, 360, 371, 373, 374, 380, 381. A
departmental skills requirement must be satisfied through
proficiency examination or completion of a minimum of eight
courses and 12 units from Professional Activity courses.

The department offers programs leading to the Master of Science
and the Master of Arts degrees with a major in exercise and sport
sciences. A minor in exercise and sport sciences is available for
doctoral students with majors in other disciplines. Students
wishing to specialize in exercise physiology at the doctoral
level may do so through the interdisciplinary physiological
sciences program. For admission and degree requirements, consult
the Graduate Catalog.

Activity Courses

Activity courses without an a, b, c or d designation are
considered to be beginning-level courses. Students who have
completed a beginning-level course, but who do not meet the
intermediate prerequisites, may repeat the beginning course for
credit. Intermediate- and advanced-level courses may be repeated
once for credit.

The department offers a free locker for students registered in
activity courses. Failure to return the lock will result in a
financial encumbrance.

100. Adapted Physical Activities (1) I II

103. Aerobic Dance (1) I II S
a. Beginning Aerobic Dance
c. Intermediate Aerobic Dance. P, 103a.

109. Backpacking (1) I II S Two-day field trip.

110. Badminton (1) I II
a. Beginning Badminton

114. Basketball (1) I II
c. Intermediate Basketball

116. Body Dynamics (1) I II S

123. Country Swing (1) I II S

125. Cycling (1) I II

132. Fencing (1) I II S
a. Beginning Fencing
c. Intermediate Fencing

136. Beginning Folk Dance (1) S Daily, group instruction in folk
dances of different regions of Mexico. Offered in Guadalajara
only. 5S.

137. Golf (1) I II S Fees.
a. Beginning Golf
c. Intermediate Golf

138. Women's Gymnastics (1) I II
a. Beginning Women's Gymnastics

141. Hiking (1) I II S Field trips.

145. Jogging (1) I II S

148. Karate (1) I II S
a. Beginning Karate
c. Intermediate Karate P, 148a

150. Lifeguard Training (1) I II S P, 169d.

159. Racketball (1) I II S
a. Beginning Racketball
c. Intermediate Racketball

164. Soccer (1) I II
a. Beginning Soccer
c. Intermediate Soccer

165. Social Dance (1) [Rpt./2 units] I II 2S.

166. Softball (1) I II
c. Intermediate Softball

169. Swimming (1) I II S
a. Beginning Swimming
b. Swimming for Beginners with Limited Experience
c. Intermediate Swimming
d. Advanced Swimming

170. Swimming for Fitness (1) I II S P, 169c.

173. Tennis (1) I II S
a. Beginning Tennis
b. Tennis for Beginners with Limited Experience
c. Intermediate Tennis
d. Advanced Tennis

176. Touch Football (1) I II

177. Triathlon Training (1) I II P, 169c.

181. Volleyball (1) I II S
a. Beginning Volleyball
c. Intermediate Volleyball
d. Advanced Volleyball

184. Weight Training (1) I II S
a. Beginning Weight Training

Anatomy and Physiology

201. Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4) I Study of structure and
function of the human body. Topics include cells, tissues,
integumentary systems, skeletal system, muscular system, and
nervous system. Primarily for majors in exercise sciences, health
education, medical technology, nursing, nutritional sciences,
occupational safety and health, physical education, speech and
hearing sciences. 3R, 3L.

202. Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4) II Continuation of
structure and function of the human body. Topics include
endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary and
reproductive systems. Primarily for majors in exercise sciences,
health education, medical technology, nursing, nutritional
sciences, occupational safety and health, physical education,
speech and hearing sciences. 3R, 3L.

Professional Activity Courses

Open to physical education majors and minors only.

208. Aerobic Dance Fitness (1) I*

211. Badminton (1) I II*

213. Basketball (2) I II*

217. Folk Dance (1) I*

218. Football (1) II*

219. Golf (1) II* Fee.

221. Women's Gymnastics (2) II*

223. Handball-Racketball (1) I II*

225. Soccer (2) I*

227. Softball (1) I II*

228. Strength and Conditioning Training (1)* I II 2S.

229. Swimming--Lifeguard Training (2) I*

230. Tennis (2) I II*

231. Track and Field (2) II*

232. Volleyball (2) I II*

*Development of knowledge and skill competencies necessary for
teaching each activity, with emphasis on skill progressions,
practice opportunities, and error diagnosis and correction.

Main Courses

260. Water Safety Instructor (2) I II American Red Cross Water
Safety Instructor Certificate will be issued to those students
qualifying. P, current advanced lifesaving certificate.
Sutherland

261. Advanced First Aid and Emergency Care (2) I II Instruction
in first-aid and emergency care procedures. The American Red
Cross Advanced First Aid and Emergency Care Certificate will be
awarded to those students qualifying. Sutherland

262. Lifeguard Training Instructor (2) II Principles and
techniques for teaching American Red Cross Basic Water Safety,
Emergency Water Safety, Lifeguard Training, and Lifeguard
Training Review courses. 4S. P, 150. Sutherland

267. Controlling Stress and Tension (2) I II S Psychophysiology
of stress and its relationship to health, with emphasis on
identifying and understanding personal stress patterns and
learning appropriate stress management techniques such as
relaxation, cognitive intervention strategies, meditation,
autogenic training, and physical activity.

269. Peak Performance (2) I II Examines approaches to
psychological training which lead to peak performance in sport
and other endeavors. Develops individualized training procedures
for maintaining optimal arousal, motivation, concentration, and
confidence.

279. Motor Development (2) I II Developmental changes in motor
patterns of children and adults; methods of diagnostic evaluation
of motor skill performance and the selection of appropriate
movement experiences. Mize

285. Principles of Teaching Physical Activities (3) I II General
principles and practical experiences related to analysis of
movement skills, correction of movement errors, and
preinstructional planning applied specifically to teaching
physical activities. Mize/Sorensen

286. Sports Officiating (1) I II Guiding principles and
standards; rules, mechanics and procedures for officiating sports
common to secondary school interscholastic and community club
programs. Consult department before enrolling.
a. Basketball (Men and Women's Rules) II
b. Baseball-Softball I
f. Volleyball II

288. Historical and Philosophical Perspectives of Sport and
Physical Education (3) I II Study of the development of sport and
physical education from ancient societies through the 20th
century; history of philosophic thought and influences on current
practices. Simko

294. Practicum
a. Movement Experiences for Children (1) [Rpt./1] I II S P, 279,
285. Mize

308. Introduction to Exercise Sciences (2) I Introduction to the
interdisciplinary nature of the exercise sciences; historical
perspectives, areas of research, and career opportunities. P,
201, 202. Henriksen

320. Psychological Foundations for Exercise and Sport (3) I II
Examines principles of motor learning and performance;
psychological factors such as personality, anxiety, and
motivation which influence learning and performance; and
psychology of exercise. P, PSYC 101. Fairchild

350. Movement Experiences for Elementary School Children (2) I
Development of knowledges and skill competencies necessary for
teaching fundamental movements, rhythms and dance, gymnastics,
games and sports to children. Open to majors only. Mize

351. Elementary School Physical Education (2) I II S Purposes and
practices of physical education at the elementary school level;
instruction in recommended activities; teaching and evaluation
techniques; class organization.

354. Theory of Coaching (2) I II Advanced instruction in sports
common to secondary school curricula; teaching and coaching
principles, advanced techniques, and organizational and practice
methods. P, 285 (not required for athletic coaching minor).
a. Aquatics (2) II 1994-95 P, 169d, 229.
b. Baseball (2) I 1994-95
c. Basketball (2) I P, 213.
d. Football (2) II P, 218.
f. Softball (2) I 1993-94 P, 227.
g. Tennis (2) II 1993-94 P, 230.
h. Track and Field/Cross Country (2) II P, 231.
i. Volleyball (2) I 1994-95 P, 232.

355. Physical Education Instruction Strategies (2) I Analysis of
alternative models of teaching physical education; research of
teaching physical education; and systematic analysis of physical
education teacher effectiveness. Open to majors only. P, 285,
394b or CR. Graber

360. Functional Kinesiology (3) II Anatomical and mechanical
factors affecting human movement, particularly in sport and
exercise situations. Open to majors only. P, 201, 202, MATH
117R/S. Atwater

371. Special Physical Education (3) I II Designed to provide the
knowledge and experience necessary for the physical education and
recreation of persons having various handicaps. Three hours per
week of related experiences by arrangement required. P, 201, 202.

373. Physiological Basis of Physical Education and Athletics (3)
I  Physiological responses and adaptations to physical activity
in various populations and environments; emphasizes fitness
evaluation and application of training principles for exercise
and sport. P, CHEM 103a-103b, 104a-104b, EXSS 201, 202. Roby

374. Physiological Basis of Physical Education and Athletics
Laboratory (1) I P, CR 373. Roby

377. Techniques in Prevention and Treatment of Athletic Injuries
(3) I II Prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of athletic
injuries; practical experience in application of preventive
taping and bandaging. P, 201, 202. Delforge

380. Scientific Foundations of Motor Learning (3) I II
Introductory investigation of principles underlying the
production of skilled motor behavior, factors which determine the
quality of motor performance, and how humans acquire and perfect
motor skills. P, 360, PSYC. 101. Writing-Emphasis Course. P,
Satisfaction of the upper-division writing-proficiency
requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis Courses" in the Academic
Guidelines section of this catalog). Russell

381. Measurement and Evaluation (3) I II Tests and measurements
in physical education; data analysis techniques for test
evaluation, test construction, and grading; experience with tests
of fitness, sport skills, and sociometric measurements.

385. Principles of Athletic Coaching (3) II Duties,
responsibilities and ethics of the athletic coach; the role of
interscholastic sport in public school settings with emphasis on
administrative functions, legal liability, facilities
coordination, and game and contest management. P, 8 units of 200-
or 300-level EXSS course work. Baker

394. Practicum
a. Athletic Coaching (3) I II P, 354, 360, 373, 374, 377.

b. Physical Education Teaching (1) I II P, 285 and professional
activities requirement.

397. Workshop
a. Physical Education Student Teaching Forum (1) I II Open to
majors only. CR, TTE 493a or 493b.

410. Sport in Contemporary Society (3) I Study of contemporary
sport from the perspectives of its personal, social, cultural,
economic and educational dimensions. May be convened with 510.
Russell

420. Exercise Physiology (3) I Regulation and adjustment of
physiological systems during acute exercise and adaptations with
chronic exercise in various populations and environments;
emphasizes physiological mechanisms. P, CHEM 103a-103b, 104a-
104b, EXSS 201, 202, MATH 117R/S, 118, PHYS 102a-102b. May be
convened with 520. Fregosi

421. Exercise Physiology Laboratory (2) I P, CR, 420. May be
convened with 521.

445. Evaluation and Regulation of Body Build and Composition (3)
I Laboratory and field assessment of body fat, lean body mass and
comatotype, anthropometry; body build and composition of the
athlete; morphology of fat and lean tissue; exercise and dietary
regulation of obesity and chronic underweight. P, 201 and 202.
May be convened with 545.

452. Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School (3) II
Theory and methods of providing movement experiences for young
children; emphasis placed upon curriculum development, methods of
teaching, class organization, and management. Practical
experiences at the elementary level. Open to majors only. P, 221,
231, 285, 350. Mize

460. Biomechanics of Human Movement (3) II Analysis of human
motion focusing on the mechanical interaction between the human
body and the external environment. 2R, 3L. P, 201, 202; or 462.
May be convened with 560. Atwater/Enoka

462. Neuromechanical Kinesiology (3) I II Neuromechanical bases
of human movement. P, 201, 202, MATH 118. May be convened with
562. Enoka

470. Scientific Methods and Professional Skills (3) II Research
approaches in human integrative biology and exercise sciences;
principles of data collection, analysis and presentation. P, 308.

477. Advanced Sport Injury Management (3) II 1993-94 Advanced
techniques in recognition, evaluation, treatment, rehabilitation
and prevention of athletic injuries. 2R, 3L. P, 377 and a minimum
of 300 clinical hours in athletic training or physical therapy.

491. Preceptorship
a. Experimental Techniques in Exercise Science (2) II P, 420,
421, 462.

495. Colloquium
a. Research in Exercise Sciences (1-2) [Rpt./3 units] I II. Open
to majors only. P, 420. May be convened with 595a. 
b. Biomechanics (2) [Rpt./1] I P, 460 or 462. May be convened
with 595b.
d. Environmental Physiology (2) [Rpt./1] II. P, 420. May be
convened with 595d.
e. Endocrinology and Metabolism (2) [Rpt./1] II. P, 420. May be
convened with 595e.
f. Integrative Cardiorespiratory Physiology (2) [Rpt./1] I P,
420. May be convened with 595f.

496. Seminar
b. Introduction to Microcomputers (1) I II May be convened with
596b. Atwater

502. Principles of Neuroanatomy (4) II (Identical with ANAT 502)

510. Sport in Contemporary Society (3) I For a description of
course topics, see 410. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research paper on one issue of contemporary sport. May
be convened with 410. Russell

520. Exercise Physiology (3) I For a description of course
topics, see 420. Graduate-level requirements include a research-
review paper on an approved topic. P, CHEM 103a-103b, 104a-104b,
EXSS 201, 202, MATH 117R/S, 118. May be convened with 420.
Fregosi

521. Exercise Physiology Laboratory (2) I Graduate-level
requirements include additional laboratory reports. P, CR, 520.
May be convened with 421.

524. Behavioral Management of the Injured Athlete (3) II
Behavioral/psychological processes involved in the rehabilitation
of the injured athlete, pain perception, and the use of
behavioral approaches in sports medicine. P, 201, 202, PSYC 101.
Fairchild

527. Psychology of Sport and Exercise (3) I Examines the effects
of motivation, personality, attitudes, competition and group
dynamics on sport performance as well as the psychological
effects of exercise, exercise adherence and exercise addiction.
Williams

528. Stress Management for Performance and Health (3) I Examines
within a biopsychosocial framework the concept of stress as it
relates to performance and the etiology of stress-related health
disorders. Also examines and applies stress management
interventions to enhance performance and promote health. Williams

529. Psychological Interventions and Ergogenic Aids for Peak
Performance (3) II The application and effectiveness of ergogenic
aid mechanisms, particularly psychological interventions, in
enhancing performance. P, 528. Williams

536. Administration of Sports Programs (3) I Designed to provide
a theoretical framework for students pursuing sports management
careers and others interested in various functions involved in
the conduct of sport programs. Baker

545. Evaluation and Regulation of Body Build and Composition (3)
I For description of course topics, see 445. Graduate-level
requirements include an additional research project and case
report. P, 201 and 202. May be convened with 445.

560. Biomechanics of Human Movement (3) II For a description of
course topics, see 460. Graduate-level requirements include a
research project. P, 201, 202, 360 or 462. May be convened with
460. Atwater/Enoka

562. Neuromechanical Kinesiology (3) I II For a description of
course topics, see 462. Graduate-level requirements include a
research paper. P, 201, 202, MATH 118. May be convened with 462.
Enoka

565. Physical Activity in Aging and Chronic Diseases:
Physiological Aspects (3) II The etiology and pathophysiological
processes involved in coronary heart disease, hypertension,
diabetes, and aging; role of exercise in prevention as a
potential therapeutic intervention. P, 520.

566. Physical Activity in Aging and Chronic Diseases:
Psychosocial Aspects (3) I Psychosocial dimensions of exercise
programs designed for populations with chronic diseases as well
as for older populations. Fairchild

570. Research Design in Exercise and Sport Sciences (2) I Study
of research designs, methodologies and data analysis procedures
pertinent to the exercise and sport sciences; emphasis is on the
selection of research problems and interpretation of research
articles. Lohman

571. Laboratory in Research Design for Exercise and Sport
Sciences (1) I Laboratory experiences in literature retrieval
systems; data analysis procedures by calculator, microcomputer,
and mainframe computer; critical analysis procedures of research
articles, and participation in a research project. CR 570. Lohman

575. Statistical Analysis (3) II Analysis of research designs and
data analysis procedures in the field of exercise and sport
sciences with emphasis on appropriateness of selected designs and
interpretation of various data analysis procedures. Statistical
power, reliability, covariance and multiple regression techniques
and uses of micro- and mainframe data analysis software. P, 570
and 571. Lohman

580. Evaluation of Athletic Injuries (3) I Advanced study of the
etiology, pathology, and clinical signs of common athletic
injuries. Emphasis on clinical evaluation of athletic injuries by
the athletic trainer. P, 377; 800 hrs. of clinical experience in
athletic training. Delforge

581. Therapeutic Modalities (2) II Advanced study of the role of
hydrotherapeutic and electrotherapeutic agents in the
rehabilitation of athletic injuries. P, 580.

582. Anatomical Basis of Sport Injuries (3) I Comprehensive
survey of bones, ligaments, muscles, nerves, and vessels of the
trunk and upper and lower extremities, with emphasis on their
relationship to sport injuries. 2R, 3L. P, CR 580. Hillman

583. Medical Aspects of Sports Injuries (3) II Common surgical
procedures and post-surgical immobilization techniques used in
the management of sports-related injuries; implications for post-
surgical therapeutic exercise programs. P, 580, 582. Hillman

584. Rehabilitation of Athletic Injuries (3) II Principles in the
planning and implementation of rehabilitation programs for
injured athletes with emphasis on application of contemporary
therapeutic exercise techniques. P, 580. Delforge

585. Issues in Athletic Training and Sports Medicine (3) II
Current issues and trends in athletic training and sports
medicine with emphasis on the professional preparation of
athletic trainers and the role of the certified athletic trainer
in athletic health care delivery systems. P, 580. Delforge

586. Physical Education and the Law (3) I Investigation and
analysis of legal parameters within which the physical educator
and coach operate; negligence theory; common defenses; product
liability; insurance; legal implications for program development
and methodology. Baker

588. Legal Aspects of Sports Administration (3) II Development of
administrative and coaching techniques from the legal
perspective. Analysis of personnel procedures, purchase of
equipment, athletic associations, certification, transportation,
medical procedures, officiating, and the handicapped athlete as
influenced by litigation. P, 586. Baker

593. Internship
a. Sports Medicine (2) I P, 581, 584.
b. Sport Psychology (1-3) [Rpt./6 units] I II S P, 528 or 529.

595. Colloquium
a. Research in Exercise Sciences (1) [Rpt./1] I II. Open to
majors only. May be convened with 495a.
b. Biomechanics (2) [Rpt./1] I P, 460 or 462. Graduate-level
requirements include a literature review paper. May be convened
with 495b.
c. Current Issues in Space Physiology (2) [Rpt./1] I P, 520.
d. Environmental Physiology (2) [Rpt./1] II. P, 520. May be
convened with 495d.
e. Endocrinology and Metabolism (2) [Rpt./1] II. P, 520. May be
convened with 495e.
f. Integrative Cardiorespiratory Physiology (2) [Rpt./1] I P,
520. May be convened with 495f.

596. Seminar
b. Introduction to Microcomputers (1) I II May be convened with
496b. Atwater

597. Workshop
a. Biofeedback: Theory and Application (1)

691. Preceptorship
a. Laboratory Rotations (1-3) I II S 3-9L. Open to majors only.
P, 570, 571.

695. Colloquium
a. Motor Control (2) [Rpt./8 units] II P, PSIO 480 and consult
department before enrolling. (Identical with NEUR 695a, PSIO
695a, PSYC 695a, SP H 695a)

793. Internship
a. Sport Psychology (1-3) [Rpt./12 units] I II S P, 528 or 529.

Medical Technology (MEDT)
1435 N. Fremont Avenue, Room 124
(520) 626-4084

Clinical Associate Professor Harold L. Potter, Jr., Director

Clinical Assistant Professor JoAnn Thomas

Clinical Instructors Deborah Wyckoff, Marlis Dinning

Medical technology is the health profession responsible for
preparing individuals for careers in hospitals or clinics which
require clinical laboratory analysis including quantitative,
qualitative and morphological measurements which assist the
physician in clinical diagnosis and treatment.

The Division of Medical Technology offers an accredited program
of studies leading to the Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences
with a major in medical technology. Admission and degree
requirements for this major are listed in the School of Health-
Related Professions section of this catalog (under Colleges and
General Divisions).

195. Colloquium
a. Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Medicine (1) II Course
offered superior/pass/fail

387. Contemporary Perspectives of the Medical Technology
Professions (3) I [Rpt./1] History and current social and
economic issues facing the profession of medical technology.
Effects of recent legislation on laboratory management. P,
consult program director before enrolling.

471R. Lectures in Clinical Hematology (5) [Rpt./1] II Lectures in
basic hematology and hematological procedures including cell
structure and function, inherited and acquired anomalies,
hemostasis, cell enumeration and differentiation, cytogenetics.
P, consult program director before enrolling. May be convened
with 571R.

471L. Fundamental Laboratory Techniques in Clinical Hematology
(2) [Rpt./1] II Basic laboratory techniques in clinical
hematology with emphasis on manual and automated hematological
procedures. Instruction includes proper procedural methodologies,
quality control, the use of controls and standards, and
interpretation of laboratory test results. P, CR, 471R/571R,
consult program director before enrolling. May be convened with
571L.

472R. Lectures in Clinical Immunology and Immunohematology (4)
[Rpt./1] I Lectures in serological methods used in the clinical
laboratory and interpretation of results; blood banking
procedures. P, consult program director before enrolling. May be
convened with 572R.

472L. Fundamental Laboratory Techniques in Clinical Immunology
and Immunohematology (2) [Rpt./1] I Basic laboratory techniques
in serological procedures and blood banking. Emphasis will be
placed on procedural methodologies, quality control, the use of
controls and standards, and interpretation of laboratory test
results. P, CR, 472R/572R, consult program director before
enrolling. May be convened with 572L.

473R. Lectures in Clinical Chemistry (5) [Rpt./1] II Lectures
encompassing the fundamental concepts of clinical laboratory
chemistry including pathophysiology and clinical correlations. P,
consult program director before enrolling. May be convened with
573R.

473L. Fundamental Laboratory Techniques in Clinical Chemistry (2)
[Rpt./1] II Basic laboratory techniques in clinical chemistry.
Emphasis will be placed on procedural methodologies, quality
control, the use of controls and standards, and interpretation of
laboratory test results. P, CR, 473R/573R, consult program
director before enrolling. May be convened with 573L.

474R. Lectures in Clinical Bacteriology (5) [Rpt./1] I Lectures
relating to laboratory techniques used to safely isolate and
identify pathogenic bacteria. Special media/tests, organismal
virulence factors, pathological effects occurring within the host
and antibiotic susceptibility testing of bacteria are covered. P,
consult program director before enrolling. May be convened with
574R.

474L. Fundamental Laboratory Techniques in Clinical Bacteriology
(2) [Rpt./1] I Basic laboratory techniques used in the isolation
and identification of bacteria pathogenic for humans. Standard
and specialized media/biochemical tests are utilized. P, CR
474R/574R, consult program director before enrolling. May be
convened with 574L.

475a-475b-475c. Topics in Clinical Microbiology (2-1-1) [Rpt./1]
I II 475a: Clinical Parasitology. Diagnostic methodologies with
emphasis on the laboratory identification of clinically relevant
parasites. 475b: Clinical Virology. Diagnostic methodologies with
emphasis on the laboratory identification of clinically relevant
viruses. 475c: Clinical Mycology and Mycobacteriology. Diagnostic
methodologies with emphasis on the laboratory identification of
clinically relevant fungi and Mycobacterium sp. P, consult
program director before enrolling. May be convened with 575a-
575b-575c.

476. Principles of Laboratory Science (3) [Rpt./1] II Basic
principles of laboratory mathematics, biostatistics, body fluids
analysis, urinalysis, quality control and laboratory safety. P,
consult program director before enrolling. May be convened with
576.

481. Clinical Laboratory Hematology (4) [Rpt./1] II S Clinical
laboratory rotation in hematology. P, 387, 471R/571R, 471L/571L,
472R/572R, 472L/572L, 473R/573R, 473L/573L, 474R/574R, 474L/574L,
475a/575a, 475b/575b, 475c/575c, 476/576, 496a, consult program
director before enrolling. May be convened with 581.

482. Clinical Laboratory Immunology and Immunohematology (5)
[Rpt./1] I II Clinical laboratory rotation in serology and blood
banking. P, 387, 471R/571R, 471L/571L, 472R/572R, 472L/572L,
473R/573R, 473L/573L, 474R/574R, 474L/574L, 475a/575a, 475b/575b,
475c/575c, 476/576, 496a, consult program director before
enrolling. May be convened with 582.

483. Clinical Laboratory Chemistry (5) [Rpt./1] I II Clinical
laboratory rotation in chemistry. P, 387, 471R/571R, 471L/571L,
472R/572R, 472L/572L, 473R/573R, 473L/573L, 474R/574R, 474L/574L,
475a/575a, 475b/575b, 475c/575c, 476/576, 496a, consult program
director before enrolling. May be convened with 583.

484. Clinical Laboratory Microbiology (5) [Rpt./1] I II Clinical
laboratory rotation in microbiology. P, 387, 471R/571R,
471L/571L, 472R/572R, 472L/572L, 473R/573R, 473L/573L, 474R/574R,
474L/574L, 475a/575a, 475b/575b, 475c/575c, 476/576, 496a,
consult program director before enrolling. May be convened with
584.

496. Seminar
a. Topics for Medical Technology Interns (1) I Writing-Emphasis
Course. P, satisfaction of the upper-division writing-proficiency
requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis Courses" in the Academic
Guidelines section of this catalog). Consult with committee
before enrolling.

571R. Lectures in Clinical Hematology (5) [Rpt./1] II For a
description of course topics, see 471R. Graduate-level
requirements include a research paper on selected topics related
to clinical laboratory hematology. P, consult program director
before enrolling. May be convened with 471R.

571L. Fundamental Laboratory Techniques in Clinical Hematology
(2) [Rpt./1] II For a description of course topics, see 471L.
Graduate-level requirements include a research paper relating to
new laboratory methodologies applicable to clinical hematology.
P, CR, 471R/571R, consult program director before enrolling. May
be convened with 471L.

572R. Lectures in Clinical Immunology and Immunohematology (4)
[Rpt./1] I For a description of course topics, see 472R.
Graduate-level requirements include a research paper on selected
topics relating to clinical laboratory serology or blood banking.
P, consult program director before enrolling. May be convened
with 472R.

572L. Fundamental Laboratory Techniques in Clinical Immunology
and Immunohematology (2) [Rpt./1] I For a description of course
topics, see 472L. Graduate-level requirements include a research
paper relating to new laboratory methodologies applicable to
clinical serology or blood banking. P, CR, 472R/572R, consult
program director before enrolling. May be convened with 472L.

573R. Lectures in Clinical Chemistry (5) [Rpt./1] II For a
description of course topics, see 473R. Graduate-level
requirements include a research paper on selected topics relating
to clinical laboratory chemistry. P, consult program director
before enrolling. May be convened with 473R.

573L. Fundamental Laboratory Techniques in Clinical Chemistry (2)
[Rpt./1] II For a description of course topics, see 473L.
Graduate-level requirements include a research paper relating to
new laboratory methodologies applicable to clinical chemistry. P,
CR, 473R/573R, consult program director before enrolling. May be
convened with 473L.

574R. Lectures in Clinical Bacteriology (5) [Rpt./1] I For a
description of course topics, see 474R. Graduate-level
requirements include a research paper on selected topics relating
to clinical laboratory bacteriology. P, consult program director
before enrolling. May be convened with 474R.

574L. Fundamental Laboratory Techniques in Clinical Bacteriology
(2) [Rpt./1] I For a description of course topics, see 474L.
Graduate-level requirements include a research paper relating to
new laboratory methodologies applicable to clinical bacteriology.
P, CR 474R/574R, consult program director before enrolling. May
be convened with 474L.

575a-575b-575c. Topics in Clinical Microbiology (2-1-1) [Rpt./1]
I II For a description of course topics, see 475a-475b-475c.
Graduate-level requirements include a research paper on selected
topics relating to clinical parasitology, virology, mycology or
mycobacteriology. P, consult program director before enrolling.
May be convened with 475a-475b-475c.

576. Principles of Laboratory Science (3) [Rpt./1] II For a
description of course topics, see 476. Graduate-level
requirements include a research paper on selected topics that
focus on the use of statistical analysis for biological systems,
or on selected topics relating to new techniques in body fluid
analysis or urinalysis. P, consult program director before
enrolling. May be convened with 476.

581. Clinical Laboratory Hematology (4) [Rpt./1] II S For a
description of course topics, see 481. Graduate-level
requirements include a research paper relating to advanced
laboratory methodologies in clinical hematology. P, 387,
471R/571R, 471L/571L, 472R/572R, 472L/572L, 473R/573R, 473L/573L,
474R/574R, 474L/574L, 475a/575a, 475b/575b, 475c/575c, 476/576,
496a, consult program director before enrolling. May be convened
with 481.

582. Clinical Laboratory Immunology and Immunohematology (5)
[Rpt./1] I II For a description of course topics, see 482.
Graduate-level requirements include a research paper relating to
advanced laboratory methodologies in clinical serology or blood
banking. P, 387, 471R/571R, 471L/571L, 472R/572R, 472L/572L,
473R/573R, 473L/573L, 474R/574R, 474L/574L, 475a/575a, 475b/575b,
475c/575c, 476/576, 496a, consult program director before
enrolling. May be convened with 482.

583. Clinical Laboratory Chemistry (5) [Rpt./1] I II For a
description of course topics, see 483. Graduate-level
requirements include a research paper relating to advanced
laboratory methodologies in clinical chemistry. P, 387,
471R/571R, 471L/571L, 472R/572R, 472L/572L, 473R/573R, 473L/573L,
474R/574R, 474L/574L, 475a/575a, 475b/575b, 475c/575c, 476/576,
496a, consult program director before enrolling. May be convened
with 483.

584. Clinical Laboratory Microbiology (5) [Rpt./1] I II For a
description of course topics, see 484. Graduate-level
requirements include a research paper relating to advanced
laboratory methodologies in clinical microbiology. P, 387,
471R/571R, 471L/571L, 472R/572R, 472L/572L, 473R/573R, 473L/573L,
474R/574R, 474L/574L, 475a/575a, 475b/575b, 475c/575c, 476/576,
496a, consult program director before enrolling. May be convened
with 484.

 


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