The University of Arizona  1993-95 General Catalog

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English (ENGL)
Modern Languages Building, Room 445
(520) 621-1836

Professors Rudolph C. Troike, Head, Susan H. Aiken, Barbara
Babcock, J. Douglas Canfield, L. D. Clark (Emeritus), Mary Jane
Cook (Emerita), Roger Dahood, Joan Dayan, Edgar Dryden, Sigmund
Eisner, William Epstein, Lawrence J. Evers, Albert F. Gegenheimer
(Emeritus), Frances Gillmor (Emerita), Roseann D. Gonzalez,
Vivian Gornick, Jerrold E. Hogle, Richard Hosley (Emeritus),
Robert W. Houston, Billie Jo  Inman, Annette Kolodny, John H.
McElroy, Gerald M. McNiece (Emeritus), Jane Miller, N. Scott
Momaday, Gerald Monsman, A. Laurence Muir (Emeritus), Steven L.
Orlen, Jonathan Penner, Charles E. Poverman, Suresh Raval, Harry
F. Robins (Emeritus), Paul Rosenblatt, Muriel Saville-Troike,
Herbert Schneidau, Charles W. Scruggs, Richard Shelton, Oliver F.
Sigworth (Emeritus), John C. Ulreich, J.P. Wearing, Peter Wild

Associate Professors H. Douglas Adamson, Jon Anderson, Carl
Berkhout, Roger Bowen, Charles E. Davis, Fredd Dye, Margaret B.
Fleming (Emerita), Donna Johnson, Arthur M. Kay (Emeritus),
Frederick P. Kiefer, Gene S. Koppel, Judy N. Lensink, Peter E.
Medine, John A. Mills, Tenney Nathanson, Frank P. Pialorsi, Duane
Roen, Charles Sherry, Richard I. Smyer, John Warnock, Tilly
Warnock, Thomas Willard, Lynda Zwinger

Assistant Professors Laura Berry, Meg Lota Brown, Daniel Cooper-
larcon, Theresa Enos, Elizabeth Evans, Naomi Miller, Thomas
Miller, Alice M. Senob (Emerita), Victoria Stein, Michelle
Taigue, Susan White

Lecturers Christopher Carroll, Tom J. Collins (Emeritus), Ruth
M.B. Gardner (Emerita)

The Department of English offers instruction in language and
literature, leading to the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts
with majors in English and creative writing, Bachelor of Arts in
Education with teaching majors in English and extended English,
Master of Arts with majors in English and English as a second
language, Master of Education with a teaching major in English,
Master of Fine Arts with a major in creative writing, and Doctor
of Philosophy with majors in English and rhetoric, composition
and the teaching of English. For further information regarding
the graduate programs, please see the Graduate Catalog.

Courses are offered in a number of topics which will allow the
undergraduate to experience a wide variety of approaches to and
kinds of literature, develop writing skills, and appreciate the
nature of the language. As well as courses in the traditional
fields of English and American literature, Mexican-American
literature, African-American literature, English
language/linguistics, composition, and creative writing, the
department offers courses in such areas as film and literature,
women's studies, folklore, American Indian studies, fantasy, and
the oral tradition. Students may participate in the study-abroad
program in London. Undergraduate majors in English can expect to
attain writing, organizational, and analytical skills which will
allow them to pursue careers in professional graduate studies in
literature, or in business, law, medicine, and a number of fields
of endeavor which demand these skills.

The major in English for the B.A.: 36 units of upper-division
English and American literature divided into two groups of 18
units. The 18-unit "core" requires ENGL 370a, 370b, 426, 431a or
431b, 444, and one seminar (496). The other 18 units must be
chosen from one of three concentrations: British literature,
American literature, or literature and composition. British
concentrators must take one course in American literature and one
in literature before 1800. Literature and composition
concentrators must take 306, 419a or 419b, one English language
course (405, 406, or 421), one applied rhetoric course (301, 401,
402, 414, or 419a or 419b), a course in writing about literature
(380 or another 496), and a literature elective at the 300 or 400
level. Majors are also required to take either HUM 250a or ENGL
251a (which may also be used in partial fulfillment of the
general education requirement in Western Civilization) as a
prerequisite. All majors are required to fill out a plan of study
with the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies or an
Associate Advisor in English.

The supporting minor for majors in English: Recommended subjects
are classics, drama, philosophy, modern languages, history and
theory of art or of music, journalism, communication,
anthropology, government, economics, history, linguistics,
psychology, sociology; other subjects as may be individually
justified.

The major in creative writing: 36 units, including 209, 210,
370a-370b; 3 units from 261, 265, 267a-267b, 380; 6 units from
301, 304, 309; 3 units from 401, 404, 409, 413, T AR 460a-460b; 3
units from 415a-415b; 9 units of upper-division (300 level or
above) literature courses in the English Department, to include 3
units of course work in modern or contemporary literature.

The minor in creative writing: 21 units, including 209, 210; 3
units from 301, 304, 309; 3 units from 401, 404, 409, 413, T AR
460a-460b; 3 units from 261, 265, 267a-267b, 370a-370b, 380; 3
units from 415a-415b; 3 units at the 400 level in modern or
contemporary literature.

The teaching major in English (for students who are candidates
for a B.A. in Education with secondary teaching certification):
36 units, including 306, 370a-370b, 380, 405, 406, 410, 411, 412,
496, one course in Shakespeare, and one course in American
literature. ENGL 107 and 108 may not be used to satisfy the
first-year composition requirement.

The minor in English language/linguistics: 20 units, including
255, 355, 405, 406, and 421; the additional courses to be chosen
in consultation with an advisor.

The teaching minor in English (for students majoring in subjects
other than English who are candidates for a B.A. or B.S. in
Education): 21 units, including 306, 370a or 370b, 380, 406, 410,
411, and one course in American literature. ENGL 107 and 108 may
not be used to satisfy the first-year composition requirement.

The teaching major in extended English: In place of one of the
minor fields listed under "Program for Secondary Education" in
the College of Education section of this catalog, a student may
combine the English teaching major listed above with additional
courses in classics, drama, English, linguistics, journalism,
reading, or communication to make a total of 50 units. One course
must be in communication.

The Honors Program in English welcomes students of any major who
have shown outstanding capacities for the study of literature.
Students normally begin as juniors and must take two 495H
seminars and six units of Independent Study (including the
writing of a thesis) to complete the 12-unit program. Students
are not required to participate in the University Honors Program
but will find the program in English very compatible with it.
Interested students must apply for the program to the Director of
English Honors.

Courses taken to fulfill the university requirement in first-year
composition may not be used as part of any English major or
minor. Satisfaction of the first-year composition requirement is
prerequisite to all other courses in English.

Students may fulfill the English requirement for graduation by
completing one of the following sequences: ENGL 100, 101, and
102; 101 and 102; 103H and 104H; for ESL students: 106, 107, and
108; 107 and 108. Students are placed in First-year Composition
by scores on the American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic
Aptitude Test (SAT) and a written placement essay.

The Center for English as a Second Language: The center offers an
intensive, noncredit program for students who are not native
speakers of English. Brochures describing the program are
available from the Center for English as a Second Language.

The department participates in the University Honors Program.

100. First-Year Composition (3) I II Elements of expository
prose.

101. First-Year Composition (3) I II Exposition, emphasis on
essays.

102. First-Year Composition (3) I II Critical papers on selected
subjects. P, 101.

103H. First-Year Composition (3) I II Exposition for advanced
students.

104H. First-Year Composition (3) I II Critical papers for
advanced students. P, 103H.

106. English Composition for ESL Students (3) I II Exposition,
syntax and usage for ESL students.*

107. English Composition for ESL Students (3) I II Exposition,
emphasis on essays, for ESL students.*

108. English Composition for ESL Students (3) I II Exposition,
critical papers, for ESL students.* P, 107.

*NOTE: All entering foreign students must take a placement
examination given at the beginning of each semester and summer
session. See "Admission of Foreign Students" in the Admission and
Registration section.

109H. Advanced First-Year Composition (3) I II Critical papers.
P, AP English score of 4 or 5. (Note: A combination of AP
composition credit and English 109H with a grade of C or better
satisfies the University first-year composition requirement. (See
Advanced Placement under the Admission and Registration section
of this catalog.)

195. Colloquium
a. Critical Reading and Writing (3) S Open to Bio-Prep program
students only.

197. Workshop
a. Thinking and Writing (3) S

207. Sophomore Composition (3) I II Exposition and critical
papers.

209. Introduction to Poetry Writing (3) I II Beginning techniques
of poetry writing. P, 102.

210. Introduction to Fiction Writing (3) I II Beginning
techniques of fiction writing. P, 102.

222. The Structures and Sources of American English Words (3) I S
(Identical with LING 222)

251a-251b-251c. Western Civilization, Literary Perspectives (3-3-
3) I II S 251a: Ancient Visions. A study of man and woman and
their struggle in literature to find patterns and methods for
self-completion. 251b: Middle Ages through Enlightenment.
Continued study of western man and woman in literature. 251c.
19th and 20th Centuries. Continued study of western man and woman
in modern literature. Courses need not be taken in sequence. P,
First-year Composition.

260. Major British Writers (3) I II Intensive study of selected
works by major British writers.

261. Modern Literature (3) I II Readings in modern fiction,
drama, and poetry.

265. Major American Writers (3) I II Intensive study of selected
works by major American writers.

267a-267b. World Literature (3-3) 267a: Dramatic literature;
great plays of the western literary tradition with emphasis on
genre, theme and structure. 267b: Narrative literature; great
narrative works of the western literary tradition with emphasis
on form, theme and culture context.

270a-270b-270c-270d. Approaches to Literature. (3-3-3-3) I II S
270a: Major Authors. An Assessment of the works of one, two, or
three major authors, emphasizing the common themes they treat and
their different modes of treatment. 270b: Major Works. A study of
one or more demonstrably major works in the western tradition
which have had a pervasive influence on western thought. 270c:
Literary Mode or Genre. A study of how individual literary forms
work and how they arise out of specific cultural circumstances.
270d: Major Themes. An introduction to important themes in
literature which incorporate, use, and transform ideas in the
literary tradition. Courses need not be taken in sequence. P,
Freshmen Composition.

277. Eroticism and Love in the Middle Ages (3) I II S (Identical
with GER 277)

285. Introduction to Humanities Computing (3) S (Identical with
GER 285)

290. Politics and the Novel (3) I II (Identical with POL 290)

295. Colloquium
a. British Life and Culture (3) I II
q. 10Q4 Creativity: A Class in Self Expression (3) I II S GRD
(Identical with HUM 295Q)

300. Literature and Film (3) I II [Rpt] 1993-94 The art of
translating literature into film as aesthetic expression and
artistic medium of the narrative film.

301. Creative Nonfiction Writing (3) I II P, 207 or 210 or 306,
and consult department before enrolling.

304. Intermediate Fiction Writing (3) I II Practice in writing
short fiction. P, 210.

306. Advanced Composition (3) I II Study of rhetorical theory;
practice in writing exposition and argument. P, 102. Writing-
Emphasis Course for English education majors.*

307. Business Writing (3) I II Practice in writing business
letters, reports and proposals. P, 102.

308. Technical Writing (3) I II Analysis and presentation of
scientific and technical information. P, 102.

309. Poetry Writing (3) I II Practice in writing poetry. P, 209.

310. The Novel (3) II S The origin and evolution of the novel as
a literary form. P, First-year Composition.

317. Lyric Poetry (3) I II A close reading of poetry. P, First-
year Composition.

319. Tolkien, Lewis, et al.(3) II The mythic dimensions of
fantastic literature, especially in the works of J.R.R. Tolkien,
C.S. Lewis, and Owen Barfield. P, First-year Composition.

320a-320b. Literature of the Bible (3-3) 320a: Old Testament:
legendary and historical narratives, prophetic literature, and
poetry. 320b: New Testament: The Gospels, the Epistles of Paul,
and Revelation. P, HUM 250a. (Identical with RELI 320a-320b)

331. Shakespeare's Major Plays (3) I II A close reading of six to
eight plays, including a comedy, a history, a tragedy, and a
tragicomedy.

342. Writers, Women and the Gods: The Caribbean Novel (3) I
(Identical with AAS 342)

346. African Literature in Translation (3) II 1994-95 (Identical
with FREN 346)

350. Oral Tradition (3) I II A study of oral tradition, with an
emphasis on American Indian myth, legend and lore. P, First-year
Composition. (Identical with AINS 350)

370a-370b. English Literature (3-3) A survey, with emphasis on
major writers in their literary and historical contexts. 370a:
From Old English to Renaissance literature. 370b: From
Restoration to modern literature. 370a is not prerequisite to
370b. Both 370a and 370b are offered each semester.

371a-371b. American Literature (3-3) A survey with emphasis on
writers in their literary and historical contexts. 371a: From the
Revolutionary Period to 1900. 371b: From 1900 to the present.

372a-372b. The Short Story (3-3) Evolution and development, with
emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 372a:
American short story. 372b: Emphasis on British and Continental
short story. P, 102.

380. Literary Analysis (3) I II Introduction to the various
modes, techniques, and terminology of practical criticism.

397. Workshop
a. Writing Workshop (1) [Rpt./3 units] I II S P, for students
whose performance on the upper-division writing-proficiency
examination is unsatisfactory.
b. Writing Workshop for International Students (1) [Rpt./3 units]
I II S P, for international students whose performance on the
upper-division writing-proficiency examination is unsatisfactory.

400. Themes in Literature and Film (3) I II Special topics or
themes in literature and film. P, 300.

401. Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing (3) I II P, 301 or 306,
and consult department before enrolling. Writing-Emphasis Course
for creative writing majors.*

402. Business Report Writing (3) I II Study and development of
written reports in business.

404. Advanced Fiction Writing (3) I II P, 304. Writing-Emphasis
Course for creative writing majors.*

405. History of the English Language (3) I II The evolution of
English sounds, inflections, and vocabulary from earliest times
to the present, with attention to historical conditions.
(Identical with GER 405) May be convened with 505.

406. Modern English Grammar (3) I II S Introduction to the nature
of grammar and approaches to the description of English grammar,
emphasizing Chomsky's transformational-generative model. Focus is
on grammatical structure, but scope includes phonology and
social/historical factors which influence the form and use of
English in various contexts. Includes practice in phonemic
transcription and sentence diagramming. P, 405. May be convened
with 506.

407a-407b. Advanced Composition for Foreign Students (3-3) 407a:
Expository writing and forms of essay writing. 407b: Report
writing, research, and development of the longer essay.

408. English as a Second Language in Bilingual Education (3) I II
Methodology for the teaching of English as a component of
bilingual education; grammar, phonology, and syntax as they apply
to the teaching of language skills. (Identical with TTE 408) May
be convened with 508.

409. Advanced Poetry Writing (3) I II P, 309. Writing-Emphasis
Course for creative writing majors.*

410. Teaching of Composition (3) I II Theory and practice of
teaching writing in secondary schools and colleges. P, 306.
(Identical with TTE 410) May be convened with 510.

411. Teaching of Literature (3) I II Theory and practice of
teaching literature, with intensive study of genres and works
commonly taught in secondary schools. P, nine units of
literature. (Identical with TTE 411) May be convened with 511.

412. Teaching of the English Language (3) I II Theory and
practice of teaching various aspects of language in the secondary
schools. P, 405, 406. (Identical with TTE 412) May be convened
with 512.

413. Poetry in Forms (3) II Explores prosody through discussing
and writing of forms and types, research paper. P, 309. May be
convened with 513.

414. Advanced Scientific Writing (3) I II Preparation of
professional literature for publication. May be convened with
514.

415a-415b. The Practice of Creative Writing (3-3) 415a: The
Practice of Poetry. P, 309. 415b: The Practice of Fiction. P,
304.

416. The Nature of Literature (3) I What literature is and does,
as exposed in theories of writing and in self-conscious literary
works.

417. Women Authors (3) I Analysis of selected writings by women
in the context of the authors' lives and social milieux.
(Identical with W S 417)

418. Women in Literature (3) II Analysis of the representations
of women in selected literary texts. (Identical with W S 418)

419a-419b. Non-fiction Prose (3-3) 419a: The essay in English.
419b: Other prose forms. P, First-year Composition; upper-
division standing.

421. American English (3) II History of the development of
American English from the colonial period to the present. Topics
include regional and social varieties, language contact, and
slang. Geographic atlas, social survey, and lexicographic
research methods are utilized. P, 405 or introduction to
linguistics. May be convened with 521.

424. Studies in Southwest Literature (3) I II (Identical with
AINS 424) May be convened with 524.

426. English Medieval Literature (3) II Survey of Old and
Medieval English literature (exclusive of Chaucer), chiefly in
modern versions.

427. Chaucer (3) I II The Canterbury Tales and other poems, read
in Middle English.

429. Chinese-American Literature 1960 - Present (3) II (Identical
with CHN 429) May be convened with 529.

431a-431b. Shakespeare (3-3) 431a: Twelve comedies, histories and
tragedies from the period 1590-1600 (including Hamlet). 431b: Ten
comedies, tragedies and tragicomedies from the period 1601-1613.
431a is not prerequisite to 431b.

432. Renaissance Drama (3) II Critical and historical study of
Marlowe, Kyd, Jonson, Greene, Dekker, Webster, Heywood, and other
contemporaries of Shakespeare.

434a-434b. Renaissance Literature (3-3) 434a: Critical and
historical survey of major authors, including More, Skelton,
Wyatt, Sidney, and Spenser. 434b: Bacon and Hobbes; Ben Jonson
and his Tribe; Donne and the Metaphysicals; Milton.

436. Japanese Sociolinguistics (3) [Rpt./1] I (Identical with JPN
436) May be convened with 536.

444. Milton (3) I Survey of Milton's English poetry, with
emphasis on Paradise Lost.

445. Introduction to TESL: An Overview (2) I The development of
English as a second language with emphasis on current trends, the
influence of linguistic theory, and the international role of
English. May be convened with 545.

446. Restoration Drama (3) I Critical and historical study of
major plays from Dryden to Sheridan (1660-1780).

448. The Theory and Practice of Writing (3) II 1993-94 (Identical
with FREN 448) May be convened with 548.

449a-449b. Folklore (3-3) 449a: Forms of verbal folklore; 449b:
non-verbal folklore and material culture (Identical with AINS
449a-449b, ANTH 449a-449b and CCLS 449a-449b) May be convened
with 549a-549b.

450a-450b. Literature of Restoration and Eighteenth Century (3-3)
450a: Survey of Restoration and early 18th-century literature
(1660-1745). 450b: Poetry, fiction, drama, and essays from 1745
to 1800.

454.  rish Revolutionary Literature (3) I (Identical with HUM
454)

458a-458b. The English Novel (3-3) 458a: Defoe, Richardson,
Fielding, Sterne, Smollett, and Austen. 458b: Scott, the Brontes,
Dickens, Thackeray, Eliot, Trollope, and Hardy.

460a-460b. Romantic Literature (3-3) 460a: Focus on the "older"
Romantics: William Blake and those born in the 1770s; Wordsworth,
Coleridge, Lamb, and others. 460b: Focus on the "younger"
Romantics, those born in the 1780s and 90s, particularly Shelley,
Keats, Byron, and others. 460a is not prerequisite to 460b.

462. Linguistics and the Study of Literature (3) II 1994-95
Linguistic methods in the analysis of literature and implications
of literary language for lingusitic theory; detailed
consideration of prosody, metaphor, narrative technique and
irony. (Identical with CCLS 462 and LING 462) May be convened
with 562.

465. Victorian Literature (3) I Major poetry, nonfictional prose,
and fiction.

466. Themes in Victorian Literature (3) II The impact of science,
the sexual revolution, art and ecology, and the Romantic
heritage.

470. Literature and Major Philosophers (3) I II Selected works of
literature in connection with particular philosophical statements
or problems. An honors section is available. P, First-year
Composition; upper-division standing.

472. Modern Fiction (3) I American, British, and Continental
fiction, with particular attention to the development of
characteristically modern techniques.

473a-473b. Modern British Literature (3-3) 473a: Development of
British fiction from the late 19th century to the present. 473b:
Development of British poetry from the turn of the century to the
present.

475. Modern Continental Drama (3) I The development of
Continental drama from 1875 to the present; Ibsen, Chekhov,
Strindberg, Brecht, Pirandello, Giraudoux, Anouilh, Beckett,
Ionesco, and other playwrights.

477. American Indian Literature (3) I II (Identical with AINS
477) May be convened with 577.

478. African American Literature (3) I The study of novels, drama
and poetry by leading Black writers. P, upper division standing.
(Identical with AAS 478)

481. Literature of the Early Republic (3) I Satire, drama,
essays, novels, and poetry of the Revolutionary and post-
Revolutionary periods; Franklin, Freneau, Crevecoeur, the
Connecticut Wits. C.B. Brown, Irving, Cooper. P, upper-division
standing.

482. American Romanticism (3) II Prose and poetry by Hawthorne,
Poe, Emerson, Whitman, Thoreau, and Melville.

483. American Realism (3) I The development of realism and
naturalism in American literature; Twain, James, Crane, Dreiser,
and other writers.

484a-484b. The American Novel (3-3) 484a: The nineteenth century-
-Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, and others. 484b: The twentieth
century--James, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and others.

485. Modern British and American Drama (3) II The development of
drama in English from 1900 to the present; Shaw, O'Casey,
Beckett, Osborne, Pinter, O'Neill, Wilder, Miller, Williams,
Albee, and other playwrights.

486. Themes in American Literature (3) I II Analysis of such
literature themes as the frontier, the American Adam, American
humor, self and society.

487. Major American Author (3) I II A consideration of the major
works of one author, including such authors as Hawthorne,
Melville, James, and Faulkner.

488a-488b. American Poetry (3-3) 488a: The Nineteenth Century:
Emerson, Thoreau, Melville, Whitman, Dickinson. 488b: The
Twentieth Century: Frost, Pound, Eliot, Stevens, Williams, and
others.

489a-489b. Contemporary American Literature (3-3) 489a:
Contemporary American Poetry. 489b: Contemporary American
Fiction. P, upper division standing.
495. Colloquium
a. Honors for Juniors (3) II
b. Honors for Seniors (3) I II

496. Seminar
a. Studies in a Literary Period (3) [Rpt./9 units] I II
b. Literary Themes (3) [Rpt./9 units] I II
c. Literary Genres (3) [Rpt./9 units] I II
d. Major Authors (3) [Rpt./9 units] I II S
e. Comparative Literature (3) [Rpt./9 units] I II S 
f. Literature and Other Disciplines (3) [Rpt./9 units] I II S

Note: Seminars serve as writing-emphasis courses for literature
majors.*

*Writing-Emphasis Courses. P, Satisfaction of the upper-sion
writing-proficiency requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis ses" in
the Academic Policies and Graduation Requirements section of this
catalog).

501. Writing Project in Creative Nonfiction Writing (1-4)
[Rpt./24 units] I II For M.F.A. candidates working on personal
essays, or consult department before enrolling.

505. History of the English Language (3) I II For a description
of course topics, see 405. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research paper. (Identical with GER 505) May be convened
with 405.

506. Modern English Grammar (3) I II S For a description of
course topics, see 406. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth outside paper. May be convened with 406.

508. English as a Second Language in Bilingual Education (3) I II
For a description of course topics, see 408. Graduate-level
requirements include a special in-depth paper. May be convened
with 408.

510. Teaching of Composition (3) I II For a description of course
topics, see 410. Graduate-level requirements include a special
topics paper. P, 306. May be convened with 410.

511. Teaching of Literature (3) I II For a description of course
topics, see 411. Graduate-level requirements include a special
topics assignment. P, nine units of literature. May be convened
with 411.

512. Teaching of the English Language (3) I II For a description
of course topics, see 412. Graduate-level requirements include a
special topics report. P, 405/505, 406/506. May be convened with
412.

513. Poetry in Forms (3) [Rpt.] II For a description of course
topics, see 413. Graduate-level requirements include a research
paper. P, 309. May be convened with 413.

514. Advanced Scientific Writing (3) I II For a description of
course topics, see 414. Graduate-level requirements include more
detailed and lengthier papers. May be convened with 414.

515a-515b. History of Criticism and Theory (3-3) 515a: Plato
through the 19th century. 515b: Modern criticism and theory.

516. Theories of Linguistic Structure (3) I II In-depth
examination of at least two recent theoretical models of
linguistic structure, including Chomsky's, with attention to
English and cross-linguistic differences. P, 506 or an
introductory linguistics course.

520. History of the German Language (3) II 1993-94 (Identical
with GER 520)

521. American English (3) II For a description of course topics,
see 421. Graduate-level requirements include additional readings
and a special topics paper. P, upper-division standing. May be
convened with 421.

524. Studies in Southwest Literature (3) I II Graduate-level
requirements include an additional term paper. (Identical with
AINS 524) May be convened with 424.

525. Beowulf (3) II (Identical with GER 525)

526. Advanced Studies in Chaucer (3) II

527a-527b. Studies in Medieval Language and Literature (3-3)
527a: Old English. (Identical with GER 527a). 527b: Middle
English.

529. Chinese-American Literature 1960 - Present (3) II (Identical
with CHN 529) May be convened with 429.

531. Advanced Studies in Shakespeare (3) I

533. Studies in the Renaissance (3) [Rpt./1] I

534. Advanced Studies in Milton (3) I

536. Japanese Sociolinguistics (3) [Rpt./1] I (Identical with JPN
536) May be convened with 436.

541. Studies in the Restoration and Eighteenth Century (3)
[Rpt./1] II

545. Introduction to TESL: An Overview (2) I For a description of
course topics, see 445. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth paper. May be convened with 445.

548. Theory and Practice of Writing (3) II 1993-94 (Identical
with FREN 548) May be convened with 448.

549a-549b. Folklore (3-3) For a description of course topics, see
449a-449b. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth paper.
(Identical with AINS 549a-549b, ANTH 549a-549b and CCLS 549a-
549b) May be convened with 449a-449b.

550a-550b. Modern Theories of Cultural Studies (3-3) (Identical
with CCLS 550a-550b.

554. Contemporary Feminist Theories (3) II (Identical with W S
554) 

555a-555b. Studies in Nineteenth-Century British Literature (3-3)
[Rpt./1] 555a: The Romantics. 555b: The Victorians.

557a-557b. Studies in Twentieth-Century British Literature (3-3)
[Rpt./1] 557a: Modern British literature. 557b: Contemporary
British literature.

562. Linguistics and the Study of Literature (3) II 1994-95 For a
description of course topics, see 462. Graduate-level
requirements include a greater number of assignments and a higher
level of performance. (Identical with CCLS 562 and LING 562) May
be convened with 462.

565a-565b. Studies in American Literature to 1900 (3-3) [Rpt./1]
565a: To 1850. 565b: 1850-1900.

566a-566b. Studies in 20th-Century American Literature (3-3)
[Rpt./1] 566a: Modern American literature. 566b: Contemporary
American literature.

577. American Indian Literature (3) I II For description of
course topics, see 477. Graduate-level requirements include a
special in-depth paper. (Identical with AINS 577) May be convened
with 477.

585. Linguistics and Computer-Assisted Approaches to Literature
(3) [Rpt./6 units] II (Identical with GER 585)

587. Testing and Evaluation in Foreign/Second Language Programs
(3) (Identical with GER 587)

595. Colloquium 
a. Professional Studies (1-3) I II [Rpt./4] Designed for teaching
assistants in English. May also be used, at discretion of
graduate program directors in English, for other professional
training.

596. Seminar
a. Medieval Literature (3) [Rpt./4] I II
b. Renaissance Literature (3) [Rpt./4] I II
c. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature (3) [Rpt./4] I
II
d. Nineteenth-Century British Literature (3) [Rpt./4] I II
e. Twentieth-Century British Literature (3) [Rpt./4] I II
f. American Literature (3) [Rpt./4] I II
g. Comparative Literature (3) [Rpt./4] I II (Identical with CCLS
596g)
h. Modern Literature (3) [Rpt./24 units] I II Open to creative
writing majors only.
i. Germanic Linguistics (3) [Rpt.4] I II P, 506
j. Second Language Acquisition Research (3) [Rpt./4] II P, 506
k. Methods and Materials of Literary Research (3) [Rpt./4] I II
l. Theories of Criticism (3) [Rpt./4] I II 
m. Studies in the Oral Tradition (3) [Rpt./9 units] I II
(Identical with AINS 596m)
n. Discourse Analysis (3) [Rpt./3] I
u. Contrastive Rhetoric (3) [Rpt./2] I P, graduate standing
w. Women's Studies (3) [Rpt./2] I II (Identical with W S 596w)

597. Workshop
a. Southern Arizona Writing Project (3-9) [Rpt./12 units] I II S
(Identical with LRC 597a, which is home)
o. The Teaching of English (3) I II S [Rpt./3] (Identical with
LRC 597o)
r. Research and Composition (3) II

604. Writing Project in Fiction (1-6) [Rpt./24 units] I II For
M.F.A. candidates working toward book-length writing project in
fiction.

609. Writing Project in Poetry (1-6) [Rpt./24 units] I II For
M.F.A. candidates working toward book-length writing project in
poetry.

612. Grammatical Analysis (3) I English grammatical analysis in
relation to the acquisition of English as a second language. P,
406/506, or introductory linguistics course. (Identical with LRC
612)

613. Second Language Acquisition in Formal Contexts (3) I
Foundations, theory, and methodology in English as a second
language. (Identical with LRC 613)

615. Second Language Acquisition (3) I Survey of major
perspectives on second language acquisition processes, including
interlanguage theory, the Monitor Model,
acculturation/pidginization theory, cognitive/connectionist
theory, and linguistic universals. Analysis of research from the
different perspectives includes consideration of grammatical,
pragmatic, and sociolinguistic dimensions of language learning.
P, 506, CR, 613.

620. Cultural Dimensions: Second Language Acquisition (3) II
Relationships between language and culture. P, 506.

693. Internship
a. Applied ESL (3) [Rpt.] I II P, 612, 613.

696. Seminar
b. Linguistics (2 to 4) I II (Identical with GER 696b, which is
home)
d. History of Rhetoric (3) [Rpt./6] I II
e. Studies in Rhetoric and Composition (3) [Rpt./6] I II S

 


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