The University of Arizona  1993-95 General Catalog

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Communication (COMM)
Communication Building, Room 211
(520) 621-1366

Professors William D. Crano, Head, Judee K. Burgoon, Michael H.
Burgoon, Henry L. Ewbank, Klonda Lynn (Emerita), Alethea S.
Mattingly (Emerita)

Associate Professors David B. Buller, Sally A. Jackson, Curtis S.
Jacobs, Henry C. Kenski (Political Science), Robert W. Sankey,
David A. Williams

Assistant Professor Calvin K. Morrill

Lecturer William E. Bailey

The Department of Communication offers courses to promote
understanding of the functions of communication at all levels of
society, from interpersonal communication to the social effects
of mass media. Because communication is the most basic social
behavior and the means by which the individual functions in
society, the study of communication is relevant to all academic
and career interests.

The degrees offered by the department are the Bachelor of Arts;
the Master of Arts, including an interdisciplinary option in
organizational communication; and the Doctor of Philosophy, all
with a major in communication. Students should consult the
College of Arts and Sciences section of this catalog for the
undergraduate program requirements for the Bachelor of Arts
degree. For graduate admission and degree requirements, students
should consult the Graduate Catalog.

The major requires 36 units in communication, 20 of which must be
upper-division course work, excluding all "university-wide house
numbered courses" except 396, 496, and 493l. All majors must meet
the following course requirements: (1) 100, 104, and one
additional course from 103, 105, 106, 112; (2) 200, 280, 281; (3)
20 units of upper-division courses, including 300, 318 and 325.

The teaching major requires 36 units: 100, 102, 103, 104, 106,
200, 280 or 281, 300, 309, 318, 325, 403, 417 and 493.

The teaching minor requires 24 units: 100, 102, 103, 104, 106,
200, 280 or 281, 300 and 493.

The department participates in the Honors Program.

100. Fundamentals of Communication (2) I II S Introduces
beginning students to the scope of the discipline of
communication. CR, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, or 112.

102. Public Communication (2) I II S Introduction to modes of
public communication with an emphasis upon public speaking as a
prototype.

103. Communication in Small Groups (2) I II S Introduction to
small group communication with practice and exemplification of
principles in small group discussion. P or CR, 100.

104. Interpersonal Communication (2) I II S Study and application
of basic communication concepts to the description and analysis
of interpersonal communication transactions. P or CR, 100.

105. Introduction to Nonverbal Communication (2) I II S Study and
application of basic communication concepts to the description
and analysis of nonverbal cues. P or CR, 100.

106. Communication of Literature (2) I II S Introduction to the
performance of literature, with emphasis on the sound and gesture
and the emotional and intellectual meanings of the texts of
prose, poetry, and drama. P or CR, 100.

111. Critical Thinking in Communication (3) I II Argument
identification and evaluation in a variety of communication
contexts. Argument preparation and presentation in written and
oral situations.

112. Introduction to Organizational Communication (2) I II S
Analysis of the structure and function of communication in
complex organizations. Interpersonal, group, and public
communication experiences are provided. P or CR, 100.

125a. Communication Activities in Debate and Forensics (1) [Rpt.]
I II Student participation in intercollegiate debate and
forensics. Open only to members of the university forensics team.
Approval of the instructor is required prior to admission to this
offering. No more than 3 units of 125 credit (a or b taken in any
combination) may count toward graduation.

125b. Communication Activities in Interpreters' Theatre (1)
[Rpt.] I II Student participation in Interpreters' Theatre. Open
only to students cast in departmental shows. Approval of the
instructor is required prior to admission to this offering. No
more than 3 units of 125 credit (a or b) may count toward
graduation.

200. Fundamentals of Analysis of Communication Behavior (3) II S
Study and application of principles of analysis to communication
functions operating to structure social groups and social
systems.

280. Laboratory Methods in Communication Research (3) I II S
Introduction to laboratory methods in communication research to
enable students to understand communication research literature.

281. Field Methods in Communication Research (3) I II S
Introduction to field methods in communication research to enable
students to understand communication research literature.

300. Introduction to Communication Theory (3) I S Origin and
development of basic concepts in communication theory and
research; survey and analysis of theories and models in research.
P or CR, 280 and 281, or permission of instructor.  Writing-
Emphasis Course. P, satisfaction of the upper-division writing-
proficiency requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis Courses" in the
Academic Policies and Graduation Requirements section of this
catalog).

309. Introduction to Mass Media Effects (3) I A review of social-
scientific research on the effects of mass media in American
society.

312. Small Group Decision Making (3) I II S A practical and
theoretical study of decision making, conflict management, and
communication interaction in task-oriented work groups.

318. Persuasion (3) I II S Theories of audience analysis and the
motivation of human conduct: the study of rhetorical devices. P
or CR, 280 and 281, or permission of instructor.

325. Argumentation (3) I II S Study of the philosophy, theory and
practice of argumentation; analysis and comparison of classical
and contemporary models of advocacy and evidence; examination of
argument in public policy, legal, and debate settings. P or CR,
280 and 281 or permission of instructor.

396H. Honors Proseminar (3) I II

403. Theories of Small Group Communication (3) I II Theory and
research on social control and deviance in groups from the
perspective of communication behavior. P or CR, 300, 318 and 325,
or permission of instructor. May be convened with 503.

408. Parliamentary Procedure (3) II Theory, strategy, and
practice of decision-making procedure in democratic
organizations. P or CR, 300, 318 and 325, or permission of
instructor. (Identical with POL 408).

409. Theories of Mass Communication (3) II An in-depth analysis
of theories of the social effects of various mass media sources
on society. P or CR, 300, 318 and 325, or permission of
instructor. May be convened with 509.

410. Struggle for the Presidency (3) I Examination of the
campaign strategies and tactics of those seeking the nation's
most powerful office from 1960 to the present. P or CR, 300, 318
and 325, or permission of instructor. (Identical with POL 410)
May be convened with 510.

411. Communication and Conflict Management (3) I II Consideration
of theory and research pertaining to the handling of conflict
across diverse contexts. P or CR, 300, 318 and 325, or permission
of instructor. May be convened with 511.

412. Organizational Communication (3) I II S Analysis of
interpersonal and group communication practices affecting goal
achievement in business, governmental, and professional
organizations. Not available for credit toward a major in
communication.

414. Verbal Communication (3) I II Theory and research on verbal
messages. Topics include patterns of conversational interaction,
processes of message construction and interpretation, functions
and contexts of messages. P, 300. May be convened with 514.

415. Nonverbal Communication (3) I II Theory and research on
nonverbal communication codes (kinetics, touch, voice,
appearance, use of space, time and artifacts) and social
functions (impression formation and management, relational
communication, emotional expressions, regulation of interaction,
social influence). P or CR, 300, 318 and 325, or permission of
instructor. May be convened with 515.

417. Relational Communication (3) I II The relational
communication process and messages people use to define
interpersonal relationships, including dominance-submissiveness,
affection, involvement and similarity. P or CR, 300, 318 and 325,
or permission of instructor. May be convened with 517.

418. Advanced Persuasion Theory (3) I II Examination of
philosophical and theoretical assumptions in persuasion in
individual, institutional and societal contexts. P or CR, 300,
318 and 325, or permission of instructor.

420. Communication and the Legal Process (3) I Presents a number
of accomplishments and challenges in the social scientific study
of law, with special emphasis on the effects of communication and
social structure on the legal processes. P or CR, 300, 318 and
325, or permission of instructor. (Identical with SOC 420) May be
convened with 520.

421. Political Campaign Communication (3) I II Investigation and
analysis of communication principles and practices in
contemporary campaigns for elective office. P or CR, 300, 318 and
325, or permission of instructor. May be convened with 521.

422. Presidential Leadership and Communication (3) II Examination
of presidential leadership and communication strategies of the
modern presidents from Kennedy to the present. P, upper-division
standing. P or CR, 300, 318 and 325, or permission of instructor.
May be convened with 522.

423. Topics in Rhetorical Theory and Criticism (3) [Rpt./1]
Intensive reading and analysis of the works of major rhetorical
theorists. Each semester will focus on a specific era or
perspective. P or CR, 300, 318 and 325, or permission of
instructor. May be convened with 523.

424. Media and Politics in America (3) I Survey of field; media
in political campaigns; media coverage of leaders, issues and
institutions; leadership strategies to influence media. May be
convened with 524.

425. Scientific Argument in Public Discourse (3) I Advanced
argumentation theory focused on examination of scientific
argument in public decision-making. Topics include general theory
of fallacies and special fallacies related to scientific
reasoning. P, 325. May be convened with 525.

428. Communication Research Methods (3) II Theories of
communication and their research backgrounds; research
methodology in communication behavior studies. P or CR, 300, 318
and 325, or permission of instructor. May be convened with 528.

445. Communication of Poetry (3) I Types of poetry analyzed, with
emphasis on their differentiation for oral presentation;
preparation for and presentations of a public recital. P or CR,
300, 318 and 325, or permission of instructor.

446. Communication of Fiction (3) II Analysis of short stories
and selected short novels, with emphasis on point of view, tone,
and characterization in preparation for performance. P or CR,
300, 318 and 325, or permission of instructor.

447. Projects in the Performance of Literature (3) I Study in
forms, styles, and aesthetics of Readers Theatre, Chamber
Theatre, and the documentary; examination of essay, biography,
short fiction, novel, and dramatic literature for group reading.
P or CR 300, 318, and 325 or permission of instructor.

450. Communication and Cognition (3) I II Interrelations between
human communication and cognitive processes. Emphasis on theory
and research in social cognition. P or CR, 300, 318 and 325 or
permission of instructor. May be convened with 550.

462. Communication and Human Relationships (3) S An advanced
course enabling students to inventory, evaluate, and develop oral
communication skills in the interpersonal, group, and
organizational dimensions of their lives. P, senior standing. May
be convened with 562.

496. Seminar
a. Research in Contemporary Issues in Communication (3) P or CR,
300, 318, and 325 or permission of instructor.

503. Theories of Small Group Communication (3) I II For a
description of course topics, see 403. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth research paper on a single
aspect of macro-communication patterns in groups. May be convened
with 403.

509. Theories of Mass Communication (3) II For a description of
course topics, see 409. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth theoretical paper on social effects of the mass media.
May be convened with 409.

510. Struggle for the Presidency (3) I For a description of
course topics, see 410. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research project. (Identical with POL 510)  May be
convened with 410.

511. Communication and Conflict Management (3) I II For a
description of course topics, see 411. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth research paper of communication
in some conflict situation. May be convened with 411.

514. Verbal Communication (3) I II For a description of course
topics, see 414. Graduate students will be required to write a
final paper. May be convened with 414.

515. Nonverbal Communication (3) I II For a description of course
topics, see 415. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth
research project on nonverbal communication. May be convened with
415.

517. Relational Communication (3) I II For a description of
course topics, see 417. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research project or theoretical paper on some issue in
the management of interpersonal relationships. May be convened
with 417.

520. Communication and the Legal Process (3) I For a description
of course topics, see 420. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research paper on a single aspect of communication in
some legal context. (Identical with SOC 520) May be convened with
420.

521. Political Campaign Communication (3) I II For a description
of course topics, see 421. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research project or theoretical paper on some issue in a
recent campaign. May be convened with 421.

522. Presidential Leadership and Communication (3) II For a
description of course topics, see 422. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth research paper or project. May
be convened with 422.

523. Topics in Rhetorical Theory and Criticism (3) [Rpt./1] For a
description of course topics, see 423. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth research project or rhetorical
criticism of a selected speaker or issue. May be convened with
423.

524. Media and Politics in America (3) I For course descriptions,
see 424. Graduate students are required to produce a 15 to 20
page research paper involving the application of two major,
competing theories to a study of nightly network news. May be
convened with 424.

525. Scientific Argument in Public Discourse (3) I For a
description of course topics, see 425. Graduate students are
required to complete a controversy-centered literature review.
May be convened with 425.

528. Communication Research Methods (3) II For a description of
course topics, see 428. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research project demonstrating ability to design and
conduct research and to analyze data. May be convened with 428.

550. Communication and Cognition (3) I II For a description of
course topics, see 450. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research project on a single issue in communication and
cognition. May be convened with 450.

562. Communication and Human Relationships (3) S For a
description of course topics, see 462. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth research project on some single
aspect of communication and human relations and additional
examination questions. May be convened with 462.

576. Field and Observational Methods (3) II (Identical with SOC
576)

589. Scholarly Communication (3) II (Identical with LI S 589)

610. Communication Theory I (3) I An overview of theoretical
perspectives on the role of verbal and nonverbal communication in
the process of generating and understanding development of
interpersonal relationships.

620. Communication Theory II (3) II An overview of historical and
theoretical perspectives on communication strategies used in
social influence attempts from interpersonal to mass media
contexts.

621. Theory Construction in Communication (3) I Theoretical and
meta-theoretical positions in the discipline of communication
with an emphasis on approaches to analyzing and developing
original theories.

660. Research Methodologies I (4) I An introduction to research
methods and designs used in contemporary communication research.

670. Research Methodologies II (4) II Advanced study of research
design and statistical analysis in contemporary communication
research.

671. Research Methodologies III (3) I S Issues in measurement and
sampling in laboratory and field research in communication. P,
670.

696. Seminar
a. Non-Verbal Communication (3) [Rpt./3] I II
c. Rhetorical Theory and Criticism (3) [Rpt./3] I II
d. Social Influence (3) [Rpt./3] I II
e. Mass Media (3) [Rpt./3] I II
f. Linguistic Investigations and Applications (3) [Rpt./3] I II
(Identical with LING 696f, which is home)

g. Message Analysis (3) [Rpt./3]
h. Organizational Communication (3) [Rpt./3] I II
i. Interpersonal Communication (3) [Rpt./3] I II
j. Information Processing and Management (3) [Rpt./3] I II
k. Research Methods (3) [Rpt./3] I II

 


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