The University of Arizona  1993-95 General Catalog

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Chemistry (CHEM)
Old Chemistry Building, Room 221
(520) 626-7908

Professors Neal R. Armstrong, Head, George H. Atkinson, Michael
Barfield, Robert B. Bates, Michael F. Brown, Michael Cusanovich
(Biochemistry), M. Bonner Denton, John H. Enemark, Robert D.
Feltham, Quintus Fernando, Leslie S. Forster (Emeritus), Henry
Freiser, Richard S. Glass, H. K. Hall, Jr., Victor J. Hruby,
Philip C. Keller, Alec E. Kelley (Emeritus), Stephen G. Kukolich,
Dennis L. Lichtenberger, W. T. Lippincott (Emeritus), James E.
Mulvaney, David F. O'Brien, Jeanne E. Pemberton, Herbert D.
Rhodes (Emeritus), John Rupley (Biochemistry), William R.
Salzman, Richard Shoemaker (Optical Sciences), Cornelius Steelink
(Emeritus), Gordon Tollin (Biochemistry), F. Ann Walker, Edward
N. Wise (Emeritus)

Associate Professors Michael F. Burke, Eugene A. Mash, Jr., John
V. Rund, Mark A. Smith, G. Krishna Vemulapalli, David E. Wigley

Assistant Professors Ludwik Adamowicz, Steven W. Buckner, Daniel
P. Dolata, Jacquelyn Gervay, Robin L. Polt, S. Scott Saavedra

Lecturer Walter B. Miller III

The Department of Chemistry provides both general and
professional training, giving a strong foundation upon which to
base a career in the fields of medicine and related health
sciences, in secondary education, or leading to industrial work
or graduate specialization in chemistry.

The degrees of Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts with a
major in chemistry, and Bachelor of Science in Education and
Bachelor of Arts in Education with a teaching major or minor in
chemistry are offered. A Master of Arts, Master of Science and
Doctor of Philosophy with a major in chemistry are also
available, as is a Master of Education with a teaching major in
chemistry.

The major for the B.S.: The Bachelor of Science degree in
chemistry is for students planning careers as professional
chemists and is also the degree for students planning on post-
graduate study in chemistry. The curriculum for the B.S. degree
meets the professional requirements of the American Chemical
Society. The following courses are required: 103a-103b and 104a-
104b, or 105a-105b and 106a-106b; 241a-241b or 242a-242b; 245a-
245b; 325; 326; 396 or 396H; 400a-400b; 405; 410; 424; 480a-480b;
and at least six additional units in chemistry chosen from the
following: 412, 440, 446, and 460 or 462a-462b. At least three of
the six additional units must be a laboratory course (412, 440,
and 446 are laboratory courses). Students planning to pursue
careers as practicing chemists are encouraged to fulfill the
foreign language requirement with German, Russian, or Japanese.

All students are strongly encouraged to participate in
undergraduate research through enrollment in CHEM 199, 299, 399,
or 499. Consult your chemistry advisor for additional information
on this program.

MATH 124, 125b, and 223; and PHYS 104a-104b and 180a-180b are
prerequisite to courses in the major. Completion of the above
Math and Physics courses meets the requirements for a Math-
Physics split minor. Other minors may be chosen with the approval
of the chemistry advisor.

The major for the B.A.: The Bachelor of Arts degree in chemistry
is intended for students who do not plan to pursue post-graduate
study in chemistry and are planning on a non-laboratory career.
The degree affords a broader exposure to chemistry than the B.S.
degree, and is intended for students needing this type of
background for careers in business, law, medicine, etc. Students
following the B.A. program may choose any language to satisfy the
foreign language requirement. The following courses are required:
103a-103b and 104a-104b, or 105a-105b and 106a-106b; 241a-241b or
242a-242b; 243a-243b or 245a-245b; 325; 326; 396 or 396H; 405;
480a-480b (or 481 in place of 480b); and one of the following
pairs of courses: 462a-462b or 424-400a or 410-412.

MATH 124 and 125b; PHYS 104a-104b and 180a-180b are prerequisite
to courses in the major for the B.A. At least two additional
units in mathematics or physics are needed to complete the Math-
Physics split minor. These units should be chosen in consultation
with the chemistry advisor.

The chemistry minor: 103a-103b, 104a-104b, or 105a-105b and 106a-
106b, and any additional chemistry courses at the 200 level or
higher to give a minimum of twenty units of credit. At least two
of these additional units must be laboratory courses. CHEM 296,
396, and 302 are not acceptable for the first twenty units of the
minor.

The chemistry teaching major: Students wishing to acquire a B.S.
degree in education with a teaching major in chemistry enroll in
the College of Arts and Sciences as pre-education chemistry
majors for the freshman and sophomore years. In the sophomore
year students apply for admission and subsequently transfer to
the College of Education to complete their junior and senior
years. Students should consult with their chemistry advisor and
also with a pre-education advisor in the College of Education to
plan their course work. 

The chemistry teaching major curriculum is designed to provide
depth in the fundamentals of chemistry as well as breadth in
mathematics and other basic sciences. Students following the
teaching major program should consider Spanish for the foreign
language requirement. The following courses are required: 103a-
103b and 104a-104b or 105a-105b, and 106a-106b; 241a-241b or
242a-242b; 243a-243b or 245a-245b; 325, 326; 405; 433; and 480a-
480b; MATH 124, 125b; PHYS 104a-104b and 180a-180b; PHYS 433 or
BIOC 433; MCB 181-182 or GEOS 101-102-103-104.

The chemistry teaching minor: 103a-103b and 104a-104b, or 105a-
105b and 106a-106b; 241a-241b or 242a-242b; 243a-243b or 245a-
245b; 325 or 322; 326 or 323. 433 is also recommended.

The double major in chemistry and biochemistry: A student may
earn a B.S. degree with majors in chemistry and biochemistry by
successful completion of the appropriate required courses.
Students seeking such a degree must consult with advisors in the
Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry to plan a suitable
program.

The double B.S. degree in chemistry and biochemistry: A student
may earn B.S. degrees in both fields by successful completion of
the appropriate required courses. Students seeking these two
degrees must consult with advisors in the Departments of
Chemistry and Biochemistry to plan a suitable program.

The department participates in the honors program.

101a*-101b**-101c. Lectures in General Chemistry (3-3-3)  101a:
An introduction to chemical principles designed for students with
a minimal background in science and mathematics. 101b:
Application of chemical principles presented in 101a to problems
of interest to prenursing and allied health majors. 101c:
Application of chemical principles presented in 101a to problems
of interest to nonscience majors. A modular approach is used with
case studies of "real world" problems. Credit is allowed for only
101b or 101c, not for both. These courses are designed for
nontechnical students and are not prerequisites for higher level
chemistry courses. P, algebra recommended; CR, 102 encouraged.

102a*-102b**-102c. General Chemistry Laboratory (1-1-1) An
introduction to the chemical laboratory with an emphasis on
development of laboratory skills and techniques, observation of
chemical phenomena, data collection, and the interpretation and
reporting of results in formal laboratory reports. Strong
emphasis on laboratory safety. Designed for students with a
minimal background in science and math. The experiments are
designed to complement the principles concurrently presented in
the corresponding lecture class and require knowledge of the
lecture material to interpret. Fees. P, CR, the corresponding 101
lecture class.

103a-103b.* Fundamentals of Chemistry (3-3) Essential concepts
and problem-solving techniques, with emphasis on chemical
bonding, structure and properties, stoichiometry, kinetics,
equilibria, and descriptive organic and inorganic topics. 103a:
P, completion of MATH 117R/S or an equivalent level of
proficiency as demonstrated by the student's score on the Math
Readiness Test; CR, 104 encouraged. Both 103a and 103b are
offered each semester. For Honors listing, see 105a-105b.

104a-104b.* Fundamental Techniques of Chemistry (1-1) An
introduction to the chemical laboratory with an emphasis on
development of laboratory skills and techniques, observation of
chemical phenomena, data collection, and the interpretation and
reporting of results in formal laboratory reports. Strong
emphasis on laboratory safety. Designed for science and
engineering majors. The experiments are designed to complement
the principles concurrently presented in the corresponding
lecture class and require knowledge of the lecture material to
interpret. Fee. P, CR, the corresponding 103 lecture class. Both
104a and 104b are offered each semester. For Honors listing, see
106a-106b.

105a-105b.* Honors Fundamentals of Chemistry (3-3) Fundamental
concepts of chemistry, with emphasis on theoretical and physical
principles; atomic and molecular structure and theory, properties
of gases, liquids and solids, thermodynamics and equilibria,
kinetics, descriptive inorganic chemistry. Open to students who
have had high school chemistry and physics and received
acceptable scores on the ACT tests. 105a: P, CR, MATH 124.

106a-106b.* Honors Fundamentals Techniques of Chemistry (1-1)
Advanced techniques in college chemistry; measurements,
separations; identification; purification and analysis of organic
and inorganic substances. Lab stresses individual studies and
library research. P, CR, the corresponding 105 lecture class.
Fees. Students are encouraged to CR for 199H to pursue original
research project.

*Credit is allowed for only one of the following lecture-
laboratory combinations: 101a-102a, or 103a-104a and 103b-104b,
or 105a-106a, 105b-106b.

241a-241b.** Lectures in Organic Chemistry (3-3) General
principles of organic chemistry. P, 103b and 104b, or 105b and
106b. Both 241a and 241b are offered each semester.

242a-242b.** Honors Lectures in Organic Chemistry (3-3) I II
General principles of organic chemistry. P, 103b and 104b, or
105b and 106b.

243a-243b.** Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1-1) An introduction
to the organic chemistry laboratory with an emphasis on
development of laboratory skills and techniques, observation of
chemical phenomena, data collection, and the interpretation and
reporting of results in formal laboratory reports. Heavy emphasis
on microscale techniques, laboratory safety and waste disposal.
Not available for chemistry majors. The experiments are designed
to complement the principles concurrently presented in the
corresponding lecture class and require knowledge of the lecture
material to interpret. Fee. P, CR, the corresponding 241 lecture
class. Both 243a and 243b are offered each semester.

245a-245b.** Organic Chemistry Laboratory (2-2) Similar to 243a-
243b. Designed for chemistry and biochemistry majors and chemical
engineers. Fees. 6L. P, CR, 241a-241b or 242a-242b.

296. Seminar 
a. Biological Chemistry (1) II Open to introductory students in
chemistry or the life sciences and premedical students. P, 103b
and 104b, or 105b and 106b. (Identical with BIOC 296a)

302. Scientific Glassblowing (1 to 2) I II Methods of design and
construction of scientific glass apparatus. Fees. 6L.

322.** Principles of Analysis I (2) I II Principles of modern
quantitative analysis. Open to nonmajors only. P, 103b and 104b,
or 105b and 106b; CR, 323 encouraged.

323.** Principles of Analysis I Laboratory (1) I II Experiments
in modern quantitative analysis. Open to nonmajors only. Fees.
3L. P, CR, 322 or 325.

325.** Analytical Chemistry (2) I II Principles of modern
quantitative analysis, including consideration of stoichiometry,
equilibrium principles, treatment of experimental data,
titrimetric and photometric analysis, and analytical separation
processes. P, 103b and 104b, or 105b and 106b; CR, 323 or 326
encouraged.

326.** Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (2) I II Experiments in
modern quantitative analysis. Designed for chemistry majors.
Fees. 6L. P, CR 325.

396. Proseminar
a. Reports on Current Research (1) II P, 241b.

396H. Honors Proseminar (3) II P, 245b.

400a-400b. Chemical Measurements Laboratory (2-2) II I Laboratory
work in modern chemical measurements and instrumentation. Fees.
1R, 6L. 400a: P, 424 or CR. 400b: P, 480b. Writing-Emphasis
Course (400a). P, satisfaction of the upper-division writing-
proficiency requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis Courses" in the
Academic Policies and Graduation Requirements section of this
catalog).

410. Inorganic Chemistry (3) I Fundamentals of inorganic
chemistry. P, 480a or CR.

412. Inorganic Preparation (3) II Standard inorganic laboratory
preparations, including coordination compounds, isomeric
compounds, and compounds typifying the groups of the periodic
table. Fees. 9L. P, two semesters of laboratory chemistry beyond
the first year.

424. Instrumental Analysis (3) II Principles of modern
instrumental methods of analysis treating basic instrumentation,
data acquisition, and spectroscopic, electroanalytical, and
chromatographic methods. P, 241b or 242b, 325 or 322, PHYS 102b,
180b.

440. Qualitative Organic Analysis (3) II The systematic
classification and identification of organic compounds. Fees. 1R,
6L. P, 241b or 242b, 243b or 245b, 325 or 322.

446. Organic Preparations (3) I Special experimental methods for
the synthesis of organic compounds. Fees. 1R, 6L. P, 241b or
242b, 243b or 245b.

460.** General Biochemistry (5) I II (Identical with BIOC 460)
May be convened with 560.

462a-462b.** Biochemistry (3-3) (Identical with BIOC 462a-462b)
Honors section available for (4) honors credits. May be convened
with 562a-562b.

**Credit is allowed for only one course or sequence in each of
the following groups: 101b or 241a-241b or 242a-242b; 102b or
243a-243b or 245a-245b; 325 or 322; 326 or 323; 460 or 462a-462b.

480a-480b. Physical Chemistry (3-3) Fundamental principles of
physical chemistry. P, 103b and 104b, or 105b and 106b; MATH
125b; PHYS 102b or 104b or 116 or CR.

481. Biophysical Chemistry (3) II Topics in physical chemistry
pertinent to the biological sciences, including chemical
dynamics, transport processes, thermodynamics, bonding, and
spectroscopy. P, 480a.

491. Preceptorship
a. College Teaching (1) [Rpt./2 units] I II S May be convened
with 591a.
b. Chemistry Course Development (1) [Rpt./2 units] I II S May be
convened with 591b.
c. Professional Service (1) [Rpt./2 units] I II S May be convened
with 591c.

Note:  A combination of 491a, 491b, or 491c may be taken up to a
total of 6 units.

501. Intermediate Analytical Chemistry (3) I Survey of principles
of modern analytical chemistry. P, 480b.

502. Intermediate Organic Chemistry (3) I Survey of the principal
classes of organic reactions. P, 241b or 242b.

503. Intermediate Physical Chemistry (3) I General survey of
physical chemistry, including thermodynamics, structure, kinetics
and electrochemistry. P, 480b.

504. Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry (3) I Principles of modern
inorganic chemistry, including synthesis, structure, physical
properties, and reactivity of inorganic compounds and materials.

507. Radiochemistry and Radiation Detection (3) I (Identical with
NEE 507)

510a-510b. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3-3) II I Survey at the
advanced level of the chemistry of the elements. P, 410.

512. Advanced Inorganic Preparations (2 to 4) II Modern inorganic
syntheses, including instruction in the use of high pressure,
temperature, and vacuum techniques and in the manipulation of
unstable compounds. 6 to 12L.

517. Structural Chemistry (3) II Introduction to the
determination of structures of complex molecules by X-ray
crystallography; the evaluation of structural information;
current topics in structural chemistry. 2R, 3L.

520. Advanced Analytical Chemistry (3) I Statistical treatment of
data, separation processes, kinetic and thermal methods of
analysis. P, 480b.

521. Advanced Instrumental Analysis (3) I Topics in
spectrophotometry, emission spectrometry, chromatography,
electroanalysis, principles of instrumentation and data
acquisition at an advanced level. P, 424, 480b.

522. Electroanalytical Methods (3) II Principles of
electrochemistry and electroanalysis, including topics on
electrochemical equilibrium and kinetics, potentiometry,
voltammetry, amperometry, coulometry, chronopotentiometry, and
modern cyclic and pulse methods. P, 480b.

523. Application of Equilibrium Principles in Analysis (3) II
Mathematical description of equilibria in aqueous and nonaqueous
systems; theoretical basis of analytical determinations. P, 480b.

524. Chemical Instrumentation (4) II Data acquisition and
experiment control by analog and digital techniques; design of
chemical instrumentation. 3R, 3L. P, 424.

525. Chemistry of Metal Chelates (3) I Theory underlying the
application of chelating reagents in chemical analysis. P, 523.

526. Spectrochemical Techniques (3) II Fundamentals and
application of spectroscopic methods for chemical analysis. P,
521.

527. Analytical Separations (3) I Fundamentals of separation
processes--single and multistage; differential migration methods.

528. Advanced Instrumental Laboratory (2) I Laboratory
experiments in spectrophotometry, emission spectrometry,
chromatography and electroanalysis. 6L. P, CR, 521.

540. Organic Syntheses (3) I Organic reactions and the methods by
which they are applied to synthetic problems in organic
chemistry. P, 241b, 480b.

541. Mechanisms of Organic Reactions (3) II Detailed analysis of
the factors which influence the rates and courses of organic
processes. P, 241b, 480b.

543. Structural Organic Chemistry (3) II Structure determination
of organic molecules. P, 241b, 480b.

560. General Biochemistry (5) I II (Identical with BIOC 560) May
be convened with 460.

561a-561b. Introduction to Biochemical Literature (1-1)
(Identical with BIOC 561a-561b)

562a-562b. Biochemistry (3-3) (Identical with BIOC 562a-562b) May
be convened with 462a-462b.

565. Enzymes (3) I (Identical with BIOC 565)

580.  ntroduction to Quantum Chemistry (3) I An introduction to
quantum mechanics, with applications to atomic structure and
spectra, the nature of chemical bonding and molecular structure.
P, 480b.

581. Chemical Thermodynamics (3) II Advanced concepts in both
classical and modern thermodynamics, with particular emphasis on
thermodynamics in solution. P, 480b.

582. Statistical Thermodynamics (3) I Introduction to classical
and quantum statistical thermodynamics with application to ideal
gases and simple solids; equations of state and elementary
solution theory. P, 480b.

583. Chemical Kinetics (3) II Classical and modern techniques in
studies of chemical reactions. P, 480b.

584. Practical NMR Spectroscopy (3) I The basic principles of
nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy; the operation of
Fourier transform NMR spectrometers and interpretation of NMR
spectra. P, 480b.

585. Biological Structure I (4) II (Identical with BIOC 585)

587. Introduction to Molecular Spectroscopy (3) II Modern
molecular spectroscopy including rotational, vibrational, and
electronic spectroscopy and their various combinations. P, 480a-
480b or consult department before enrolling.

591. Preceptorship
a. College Teaching (1) [Rpt./2 units] I II S May be convened
with 491a.
b. Chemistry Course Development (1) [Rpt./2 units] I II S May be
convened with 491b.

c. Professional Service (1) [Rpt./2 units] I II S May be convened
with 491c.

Note: A combination of 591a, 591b, or 591c may be taken up to a
total of 6 units.

613. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Inorganic Reactions (3) I An
examination of the techniques and reasoning used in assigning
reaction mechanisms. P, 510b.

614. Organometallic Compounds (3) I Compounds containing carbon-
to-metal bonds, with emphasis on those of the transition
elements, and the determination of their structures. P, 410.

615. Coordination Chemistry (3) I Selected topics in the area of
coordination compounds of transition metals, with particular
emphasis on ligand field theory, the symmetry aspects of the
spectral properties of transition metal complexes and their
magnetic behavior. P, 510b or CR.

618. Computations in Chemistry (3) [Rpt./1] State-of-the-art
computational methods in chemical research, including approximate
and ab initio electronic structure methods, molecular mechanics,
and modeling graphics. 2R, 3L. P, consult department before
enrolling.

640. Advanced Organic Synthesis (3) II Theory and practice of
molecular design and construction as applied to synthesis of
complex organic molecules. P, 540 or consult department before
enrolling.

642a-642b. Polymer Chemistry (3-3) I II Synthesis,
stereochemistry, and mechanisms of formation of high polymers.
642a: Condensation and ring-opening polymers. 642b: Vinyl
polymers. P, 540. 642a is not prerequisite to 642b.

644. Heterocyclic Compounds (3) I The behavior of the more
important heterocyclic systems. P, 540.

645. Chemistry of Natural Products (3) I Isolation, structural
elucidation, total synthesis, biogenesis, metabolism, and
physiological importance of natural products. P, 540.

646. Advanced Organic Chemistry (3) [Rpt.] II Advanced topics in
organic chemistry, such as peptide chemistry, computer
simulations, bio-organic chemistry, and other topics
characterized by faculty expertise. Topics will vary each
semester. P, consult department before enrolling.

680. Quantum Chemistry (3) II Principles of quantum mechanics
with applications to the properties of molecules. P, 580.

682. Statistical Mechanics (3) II Fundamental principles of
classical and quantum statistical mechanics, the Darwin-Fowler
method, Mayer cluster theory of gases, theory of fluids and
related topics. P, 582.

684. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (3) II The use of nuclear
magnetic resonance and electron spin resonance in studies of
molecular systems. P, 580.

687. Molecular Spectroscopy (3) I Applications of quantum
mechanics to the interpretation of the spectra of molecules of
chemical and biological interest. P, 580.

695. Colloquium
a. Chemical Research Opportunities (1) I
b. Exchange of Chemical Information (1 to 3) [Rpt./7 units] I II
S

696. Seminar
a. Analytical Chemistry (1 to 3) [Rpt./8 units] I II
b. Inorganic Chemistry (1 to 3) [Rpt./8 units] I II
c. Organic Chemistry (1 to 3) [Rpt./8 units] I II
d. Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics (1 to 3) [Rpt./8
units] I II

697. Workshop
a. Chemical Instruments (1 to 3) [Rpt./8 units] I II

 


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